Wednesday, May 20, 2015

1937: WAS THIS THE BIRTH OF THE LEGENDARY TOMATO PIE?

I extracted other things on sale at "Maggio's Specials" in the newspaper ad above in order to show this very interesting listing of tomato pie places in the city of Trenton in 1937. Not listed is the original site of Rick and Pat DeLorenzo who had a tomato pie restaurant on South Broad and Ferry Street in Trenton in the late 1930's.
 

Monday, May 18, 2015

OF PORK ROLL, PREPARED HAM, PORK SAUSAGE ALL THANKS TO MR. TAYLOR




 
 With the upcoming Trenton "Pork Roll Festival" which has morphed into a legal brouhaha with two festivals I understand are to be held simultaneously, I dug into my comprehensive database which includes Trenton's famous "TOMATO PIES" and began researching the Taylor connection to this delightful locally famous delicacy.I found that the Taylor family has an historical genealogy in Burlington County that dates back to the pre-Revolutionary War years. My "PORK ROLL" folder has a number of interesting articles, some of which involved legal battles over the years as can be seen in this collection of Pork Roll articles and  ads. Case was a "Johnny-come-lately"  entry into the industry, but still is my personal favorite. 

Hmmm....how about a new slogan on the free Trenton-Morrisville bridge: 
"TRENTON BASTES, THE WORLD TASTES" 
with a large image of a pork roll as part of the new slogan.



Sunday, May 17, 2015

1937: NORTH BROAD STREET FROM DUNHAM'S SIDWALK AT STATE AND BROAD, LOOKING NORTH

I am editing many of my past R.C. Maxwell photos with the proper copyright information as requested by the Librarian at the Duke University Library R. C. Maxwell collection. I am also enhancing the photographs with a change from the Maxwell sepia tone to common "gray scale,"and including the copyright and photo identification information as seen in the red insert below the photo.

1937: IS THAT LITTLE CAR A "BABY AUSTIN" OR A "BANTAM?"

This R.C. Maxwell photo caught my eye when I saw that little car parked at the curb on Trenton's North Broad Street. When I was a boy, I remember we often saw a car that was a sub compact and we identified it as a "Baby Austin" which was a British Marque. I will call on our resident auto expert Ray Paskiewicz to identify that little gem for us. The photo is taken from the are of Dunham's at State and Broad, looking North. Splendid detail as usual.

Saturday, May 16, 2015

1869: ST. MARY'S CATHEDRAL AN ASTOUNDING PROPHESY

 
I was overseas in the U.S. Army when that tragic fire occurred in March, 1956. I have a growing file of articles and news photos relating that beautiful North Warren Street house of worship. One of the articles tells the story of the steeple which pierced the Trenton Skies and was a familiar landmark to those of my generation. It tells of the labor intensive effort it took to hoist those huge oak girders in place and and even more intensive effort to put the bells in place. Each huge bell that chimed a specific musical key had a name assigned to it. The article above refers to the construction during the early years of St. Mary's. I have highlighted the IRONIC specter of a fire at the beautiful edifice.

Tuesday, May 12, 2015

1946: AN INCREDIBLY HISTORIC HAMILTON LANDMARK

We in the realm of historical interest intensely dislike the word "progress" when it is used in relation to irreplaceable historic buildings. Unfortunately. this wonderful relic of the 16th century is long gone. Here is a splendid R.C. Maxwell photo of the building as it looked when I was a lad of 13. I probably passed by it countless times on my way to Lakeside in Yardville, but had no idea of the incredible history that resided within its walls.

2015: REMEMBERING MY BUDDY JESS ANDERSON

ABOUT THE GRAPHIC. I couldn't find a photo of the Colonial Diamond T that I loved as my favorite fire truck of the era, so I borrowed one from the web and Photo Shopped the name "Colonial VFD" on the side. The lower center photo is of Jess and me at Kuser Mansion where we hosted a number of evening programs relating to the Hamilton of yesteryear. That particular evening Jess and I and my brother Bud recalled our years at Kuser Elementary School to a very receptive audience of local citizens.

Losing my dear wife Judy triggered a very sensitive part of my being as I recalled all the wonderful people I have loved and known all during 81 years of life the Lord has given to me thus far. Beside my best buddy Don Slabicki about whom I have written countless columns recalling our childhood in the Hartley Avenue neighborhood, countless persons from the past pass before me in an endless parade. My first true love, Shirley Whitebread, Madeline Bencivengo, Shirley and Dave Sneath, the Dilts family,   Donnie Cook, Bobby and Dick Soffel, Beb and Brut Peters, Louise Baird and all the wonderful teachers I had at Kuser School and Hamilton High, and countless acquaintances whose influence on me has made me the person that I am: a melancholy "nostalgiac" who loves "living in the past;" a really wonderful place to live. All of which brings me to this post. Jess Anderson was one of those buddies of mine. He and I and Don Slabicki were very close in our later teen years. In fact, as you will read in a column I wrote many years ago, it was Jess who suggested that I join his as a fellow volunteer at Hamilton's Colonial Volunteer Co. As it turned out, I was not a qualified smoke eater as Jess.

1982: REMEMBERING A LANDMARK THAT SHOULD NEVER HAVE BEEN DESTROYED

When one gets involved with tedious art work such as the pen and ink sketch I made way back in 1982, memories of working on that historic "White Horse Inn" had my mind flashing back to the years when that historic old building was in full operation. As I laid in the details of the dirt road, I imagined a group Civil War Yanks coming to the watering hole from nearby Camp Perrine or Camp Olden. In passing the abandoned Bromley Inn on Nottingham Way, I fear we will soon hear news that historic old 1890's Charles Fulkert historic landmark will be relegated to the wrecker's ball. Were I to be lucky enough to win one of those massive lottery playouts, there would be MANY local venues that would be preserved. Dream on, Glover!

Sunday, May 10, 2015

Needless to say, today (Mothers Day) is an emotional roller coaster for me as I continue to work through the "acceptance" stage of the loss of Judy, my dear wife of 61 years. Almighty God has prepared victims of mourning the loss of a loved one by having a loving family at one's beck and call. An example is found in the graphic shown here. A few days ago, I posted the landscaped terracing (top photo) that my son Ken set up for me using his incredible horticultural skill. He remembered his grandmother's (my mom's) warning that Mothers Day was the earliest time to plant spring and summer flowers. I love Gerber Daisies, and picked out the most spectacularly beautiful specimens as seen in the photo below. Ken used his exceptional floral knowledge to fill in the rest of this beautiful flower bed.

Thursday, May 07, 2015

1913: TRENTON STREET NAMES

I spent the better part of this morning looking for the establishment of Arena Drive in Hamilton. I have concluded that when they cut the new street through from "Old Olden Avenue" to White Horse and ultimately to Yardville, in the summer of 1958, that it was named for Al Arena's nightspot on Arena Drive where Central Avenue intersects. Unfortunately, the above fascinating articles from 1913 show the genesis of many of Trenton's streets but unfortunately rural Hamilton was not included.

2015; EXCITING NEWS FOR LOCAL HISTORY BUFFS

Above is a graphic I put together announcing the reprinting of Elma Borden's history of Groveville. This volume has been out of print and copies of the original as seen in the graphic are very scarce. The note from Dr. James Federici, President of the Historical Society of Hamilton Township has details on how to reserve a paperback copy of the book. Call Ms. Shirley DiGenova at 609-585-6019 to order your copy.

Saturday, May 02, 2015

1946:STATE AND BROAD IN THE LOVELY MONTH OF JUNE

You will note that there are duplications of many of these R.C. Maxwell photos being previously posted. I am reviewing and somtomes altering a collection of these photos that are being legally posted as per U.S. Copyright laws. This photo is one that provides a closer look in more detail thus achieving a close up view which is not as detailed as in the  original view. This photo will also be posted on various Facebook pages, but "Facebookers" will not be able to fill their screen completely as they can here at www.glover320.blogspot.com, due to graphic size limits on the Facebook pages. To me, this is an exquisite example of Trenton's then busiest intersection as it was in the 1950's and 1950's

Thursday, April 30, 2015

KUSER FARM: MY CHAPEL IN THE WOODS (

As Father Time adds wrinkle after wrinkle on little Tommy Glover, so too hasFather time  taken his toll on the the Kuser Farm of my youth. As seen in the photo above, a very young Tommy poses in the sumptuous Kuser Farm Grape arbor. It was from these vines that a bountiful harvest of Concord Grapes made their way to the Kuser and Glover kitchen as Mom Glover made grape jelly, jam, and juice. Click on the link to read about the Kuser Farm I remember as a boy. Today, the vines are untended and will be gone completely within a few years.


Wednesday, April 29, 2015

2015: HAMILTON HISTORICAL SOCIETY MAY MEETING CANCELLED

"The best laid plans of mice and men:" We are moving our May meeting of the Hamilton Township Historical Society HAMILTON HIGH on screen program to June 1st, same time, same place. The Township of Hamilton will be re-surfacing and re-lining the entire parking area over the weekend of May 1, 3 and 4.

1934: CENTER CITY TRENTON, 81 YEARS AGO

Were it not for the incredible tweaking features available in Adobe's "PhotoShop" I would never be able to make light areas darker and dark areas lighter, sharpen the focus, change from sepia to gray scale and countless other "tweaks" that result in an historic R.C. Maxwell photo showing the old Hotel Windsor, Woolworth's, and for the real old timers, I will see how many can identify that huge arched architectural gem on the immediate left in the photo, across the street from Trenton's beautiful First Presbyterian Church. Hint: "TSFS."

Tuesday, April 28, 2015

2015: "IT'S SO NICE TO HAVE A MAN AROUND THE HOUSE

"It's so nice to have a man around the house" was a popular song telling of a lady's observation that it is indeed a nice thing to have a guy around. So too, as I pile on the years do I find it's nice to have a man around the house who can lighten the load for me when it comes to household chores. One of those chores was the annual preparation of that beautiful Sycamore tree that reposes on my front lawn as it has since the late 1930's when it was planted by the Atlantic Avenue developer named Slack. I can still manipulate those HEAVE Belgian blocks, but anyone familiar with them will agree that they are very heavy. As I age they seem to get heavier every year. Along comes my son Ken who has given me a welcome respite from the drudgery of setting up that flower bed for my 62nd spring season. Above is a photo vignette showing Ken's craftsmanship. In prior years, I had tended to that location with only a skim of top soil and mulch which quickly eroded during a very heavy rain. Ken has inherited the Glover-Britton music talents as can be seen in the photo where he skilfully plays his guitar. (Self taught). His musical group "Just One More" is very popular down in Medford NJ at Ott's Restaurant. He also inherited his grandmother's talent as the neighborhood "green thumb" with the beautiful array of flowers that was the hallmark at our 131 Hartley Avenue home back when I was a boy. Thanks to his gardening, horticulture, landscaping, talents, Ken set about constructing the terraced top soil filled foundation shown in the photo above which will soon be filled with a gorgeous flower bed with flowers I depend on him to choose. Right about now, my dear wife is smiling down on this beautiful view, happy in the knowledge that life goes on and despite the emotional crisis that exists with the husband and family she left behind as she passed on to be with the Lord. Mom Glover told us we should never plant those spring annual until after Mothers Day and Ken abides by that rule. When Ken's flower bed is completed, I will be re-posting the photo. Watch for that post!


Sunday, April 26, 2015

2015: ANOTHER LOVELY SPRING FLOWER DOES A LOT TO TAKE AWAY MY SAD MEMORIES

This is my lovely granddaughter Abigail Saiia. She is an art student at Monmouth University and as an early on dabbler in pastels and pen and ink art, when I see her incredible artistic output I am completely overwhelmed buy her outstanding talent with canvas, paper, ceramics and other tools of the trade. Abby turns 20 today, just a week or so before her sister Jessica graduates from Rider University summa cum laude.

Friday, April 24, 2015

APRIL 24, 1954 - APRIL 24 2015 AN ANNIVERSARY BEING CELEBRATED IN HEAVEN


Today is a landmark day for me as I celebrate my 61st anniversary without my dear Judy who went to be with the Lord on December 17, 2014. (Merry Christmas, Tom!). Without my faith, my family and COUNTLESS friends,  this journey would be worse than trying to climb the rock of Gibraltar in dress shoes. That faith was given to me by three people during my young years: Judy Britton, then Father Leonard Toomey, and my best buddy of all time, Don Slabicki who surprisingly invited me to a St. Anthony Holy Name Society meeting many, many years ago. This summer, as I embark on my 9th season of music concerts at Kuser Park, my new singing partner Jack Pyrah and I will be concentrating on songs of Faith, Inspiration, Love, and Mirth as we sing uplifting songs that encourage those who attend this free volunteer community program to dance or sing along. I sent the above graphic heavenward to Judy this morning. I know is smiling as she recalls our happy years together
**********
 Let me tell you about that music that Jack and I will be singing this year at the Kuser Gazebo:
There is a remarkable musical concept known in the industry as "MIDI." "Musical Instrumental Digital Interface." I could never go into detail explaining this heavenly gift, but I can tell you it has changed my life and has given me the ability to pray in song, (He who sings prays twice.") Indeed, the advent of the computer has proven to be a most incredible "life changers" for me since I got into computing in the middle of the1980's. Along with  this very successful website which will soon achieve 900,000 visits to my 8000-plus pages of local history, ephemera and nostalgia, I have received a very special computer "bonus" which allows me to pick out any or all instruments, grab one of the hundreds of "midi" songs in my computer, push the midi player's "Play" button, and sing along. This remarkable computer program is perfect for those of us who have the ability to sing, but never had the talent to play an instrument with which to sing along.  Thanks to the availability of thousands of "midi files," I can pick from the thousands of songs, adjust the tempo, and find the appropriate key for my baritone voice; truly a digital gift from above!.

Sunday, April 19, 2015

1954-2015 SIXTY ONE YEARS


As you might imagine, this coming week is going to put me on an emotional rollercoaster as April 24th arrives and my reach our 61st anniversary. The photo at the top is the latest bouquet of cut flowers that I have set up in my living room, along with appropriate graphics as seen below. It ain't no fun to live alone and miss that special someone. However, one of the prices one must pay for a happy marriage is one must be left behind. I won that lottery.

1943: NO WONDER WE WON THE WAR WITH THESE PATRIOTS!

...

2015: WOW, DO I REALLY HAVE ALL THAT TALENT? NO!


I must admit that I am not very proficient when it comes to understanding the social networking website, "Linked-in." The graphic above is an extracted segment of what appears to be folks who over the years have credited me with numerous talents that I never knew I had. For instance: I have absolutely no experience with "Grant Writing." Indeed, I have been contacted by Mercer County with an occasional email advising of a grant writing opportunity. My exposure to that subject was intimidating to me and at each opportunity to write a grant request, I "chickened out." The other skill with which I have been credited is "Teaching." Hey! My education was Kuser Grammar School and Hamilton High School 1951, followed by the school of hard knocks in the U.S. Army, and living happily with my dear wife of 60 years. I never went to college, nor did my mom and dad have the $900 tuition required when I told them I would like to go to Trenton State Teachers College and become a history major. As to the other "skills" listed, I guess my 81 years of living with the talents God has given to me are reflected in the very generous table above. However, I would change "Museums" to "Library," or some other definition of my historical repository. As to the other "Skills," I would hope so, after 60 of my 81 years have been spent on those lifetime goals.














































Thursday, April 16, 2015

1927: WEST FROM SOUTHARD STREET EASWARD TO HAMILTON TOWNSHIP

I am also posting this interesting 1927 map from Fitzgerald's Trenton City Directory on Facebook but in order to see it Facebookers will have to see it fully on www.glover320.blogspot.com. Unfortunately maps are a challenge even here in the blogosphere as their mere size intimidates even the larger computer monitors. How I would love to have a computer and monitor that would present an entire newspaper page with clarity. This 20 inch monitor on mine does a reasonable job, but as you can see there are areas on all 4 sides of the map that are too big for current technology. My 11 x 17 tabloid scanner does a fine job, but I still end up with clipping. HOWEVER, you will find that the area scanned on this map is quite complete from the Southard Street area over to Cedar Lawn, Homedell, and nort the the Greenwood cemetery. Enjoy!

Wednesday, April 08, 2015

2015: 70 CAME TO OUR HISTORICAL SOCIETY "NOSTALGIA" NIGHT"




I was completely overwhelmed with the number of local citizens who attended our Monday night, April 6th meeting of the Hamilton Township Historical Society. Putting these programs together is a daunting and time consuming task, but thanks to all of you who attended, the time and effort is well worth the time. Our May meeting will feature the first 50 years of Hamilton High School; Hamilton's first. Details will follow in the near future.

Friday, April 03, 2015

2015: A HAPPY AND HOLY EASTER AND PASSOVER TO ALL!


1912: PENNINGTON IS GROWING

This is one of the towns I would love to have called home after I married back in 1954 but unfortunately the real estate was geared to the more affluent in our community and Judy and I certainly weren't in that category. Here's a very interesting graphic showing the "movers and shakers" that were responsible for making "Pennytown" the delightful and bucolic town we have today.

Tuesday, March 31, 2015

2015: REST IN PEACE, "CUZ"

Aging has its good and bad moments. One of the bad ones involves our daily look to the obituary page of the morning newspaper. We senior citizens remember in our younger years seeking the wedding announcement section of the daily paper to see which of our classmates tied the knot. Now we check the obits to see if we know anyone who has gone to be with the Lord. Some of those obits touch a warm spot in my heart. Above is the 1944 photo of my cousin Charlie Gaudette whose dad (my Uncle) was the Superintendent of Trenton's War Memorial building for so many years. Charlie was movie star handsome and Mom Glover used to say he had a remarkable resemblance to MGM's Peter Lawford. Rest in peace, Charlie. You were still another tribute to those who were members of the legendary "GREATEST GENERATION.

Friday, March 27, 2015

1935: 400 BLOCK SOUTH BROAD STREET

I have digitized 2 versions of this photo. This is the original, and the second zeroes in on the merchants that were once located on the right side of the street; specifically, Harry's Supply. Harry's was a very popular party supply for citizens, churches, fire houses and any others.

1921:WITTMAN JEWELRY CO

Once again, R.C. Maxwell comes through with this incredibly in focus photo of Wittman's at 33 E. State Street in Trenton. Included is an ad I found in the "BUSINESSES-TRENTON" folder and brought the duo together to form a pretty nice example of this particular Trenton merchant's organization.

1907 AND 1921: THE ARCADE BILLIARD PARLOR

To a hopeless romantic such as I, visions of dark walnut paneling and deep maroon Victorian wallpaper would be part of the ambiance that would be found in this Victorian pool hall. The ad has been extracted from my "BUSINESSES-TRENTON" folder and superimposed on this splendid photo of the first block of East State Street. Note that the photo is dated 1921 and the ad from 1907.

1913: THE TRENTON HISTORICAL SOCIETY

Even though I am not a Trenton resident, like many of my contemporaries, I have very pleasant memories of that great old town of my youth and pray that one day it will do that Phoenix thing and rise once again from the ashes and resume its place as the historic treasure it is. All of which brings me to the article above. As an active member of the Hamilton Township Historical Society, I naturally tried to find the year it was established which appears to be just after World War II. Unlike Trenton, Hamilton forefathers were really derelict in saving and preserving historic "Hamiltonia."
Reading this interesting article on what appears to be the formal founding of the Historical Society of Trenton also suggests that it may be the genesis of Trenton's renowned "Trentoniana" collection. I could find no concrete information of a formal establishment of the society until I uncovered the above article. However, there are numerous articles from the 1840's indicating that there was some form of a society even back then. I have always had an abiding love for the city of my youth. Trenton had a very unfortunate setback in the 1960's when much of the town was plunged into social unrest with rioting, looting and what turned out to be irreversible destruction.