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Thursday, July 25, 2013

1940: CALHOUN STREET AT SHILOH BAPTIST CHURCH

A very familiar location to those of us who drove this road down to the Calhoun Street Bridge, passing the very exclusive Glen Cairn Arms Apartments. Part of the front of Shiloh can be seen in the left of the photo. In fact, if you enlarge it, you may see the name on the front arch.
http://library.duke.edu/digitalcollections/rcmaxwellco_XXH0429/


6 comments:

Anonymous said...

Tom:

Know this block well. Building over the bridge with the "Coal Adv. on it was "Klotz's Beverage Emporioum", The building just beyond that was occupied by Hundley Real Estate, who son Seymour had a tryout with the Jets as a kicker, and would you belive, I go to church here in VA, with a couple who were the Hundley's best friends. Unseen opposite those noted above was Monte Chico's original Motorcyle shop, and on the corner beyond him was the offices of Dr. Minor Sullivan famous for his "testimony" in the Storied "Trenton Six" trial.

Best wishes

Mike Kuzma

rayfromvillapark said...

Mike, What is the time period, you are saying Monty Chiacchio, occupied the building on Calhoun. Going back to the 1940's, his Harley Davidson dealership, was on South Broad, across from the Marsh Hobby Shop, and before that, possibly on Butler St. However, back in the 1940's John Karpinski (Karpe), had an Indian Motorcycle dealereship in a small wooden building just on the other side of the bridge in the photo. Indian went out of business in 1953. Karpe retired, and moved to Florida. I remember visiting both locations, as a kid. There was always an Indian 80 Chief sitting in the window on Calhoun. An awesome machine. rayfromvillapark

JoeB said...

Ray:
Chico was originally from Elmer Street, then to S Broad on one side then to across the street.

Joe b

Anonymous said...

Ray:

You bees right. It was Karpe who had the Indian Shop there. I misspoke and said Monte when I knew he had his original place on Elmer St. Where Bennets Coal Co. was.
The thrill of seeing that photo and remembering the Indian Chief I first road as a passenger in 1939, overwhelmed me I guess.
Do you recall the difference on the Harley and Inidan, other than the skirt on the front wheel of the Indian?

Chalk my goof up to old age!!! you'll get there some day sonny.

Regards

Mike

rayfromvillapark said...

Mike, There were many differences between the Indian and the Harley Davidson. I'll address the motorcycles, which reflect the time period of my discovery of these wonderful bikes. The 1946-48 Indian Chief was powered by an 80 cid side valve V Twin motor, and contained a torque evener.The fenders were skirted and there was a lit Indian head running light on the front fender. The big Indians were not trendy, like the Harley and remained mechanically the same for a number of years, but they were good open road bikes. the 1948 Harley 74 was an overhead valve V twin 74 cid Panhead, with a springer fork. In 1949, they were known as Hydra Glides. They were slightly faster than the Indians. This is a pretty basic comparison, lots of small details were different. I love big cruiser motorcycles, especially from the '40s era, but in reality, I have only ridden 3 or 4 bikes in my lifetime, and I am by no means an expert, although I have a number of books on the subject. rayfromvillapark

Anonymous said...

Ray:
You young guys got it all together!
Your expertise is unequelled.

I was looking for a simple response like; one shifted on the right side of the tank, the other o the left side.
Things got confusing if you rode various cycles. My first was a 1953Triumph Bonneville. Bought it in a basket, and my good friends Dad Steve Tarcza put it together for me. Road for many years with Sherm Cooper. Lots of crazy stories. Few knew that he was the 50 mile National Champion back in the 50's.
Finished with a Yamaha that I rode through the fields and woods near my farm in Ringoes.
Gave up my licensed when I moved to Virginia in 2003.

Alway great to hear from you.

Regards

Mike