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Wednesday, May 29, 2013

2013: ART FINKLE'S TRENTON WEBSITE

Few things spur my imagination more than the area of South Trenton from Market Street down to Lalor. Who wouldn't want to learn about that fabled area affectionately known as "Jewtown," where hard workers fresh from "the old country" came to raise their families and establish countless businesses. The Trenton Jewish population will go down in history if and when the story of their magnificent historical heritage is brought out of the past and presented here in the future. Thus it is with Mr. Art Finkle who has taken the step to digitize Jewish Americana with a special emphasis on the local Jewish population. I am really pleased to see local history being brought into the digital age for present and future generations so that they may learn another fascinating facet of local history. On a personal note, Art, I replaced the out of focus "American Jewish Historical Society" with one from my files. I am sending you a copy of it for future use.

4 comments:

RALPH LUCARELLA said...

HI TOM....THE JEWISH MERCHANTS WERE VERY POPULAR IN CHAMBERSBURG. SAM AND BENNY LIGHT DID A BIG BUSINESS AND SPOKE ITALIAN BETTER THAN I. AND MAX INTROLIGATEWR ALSO DID VERY WELL ALONG WITH URKEN AND COHEN'S DEPT STORE. WE ALSO HAD WHAT WE CALLED THE RAG MAN WITH HIS HORSE AND WAGON. SAMMY LIGHTS'S DAUGHTER STARRED IN THE TV SHOW "WHOSE THE BOSS" WITH TONY DANZA. SO, IN ADDITION TO JEWTOWN THE BURG HAD THEIR SHARE OF JEWISH PEOPLE. BEST REGARDS.

rayfromvillapark said...

Hi Tom, Ralph brought up a personality from the past that really struck a chord with me. The rag man! He struck fear in the hearts of little kids, me included, when he sounded that familiar, Rags, in his low guttural voice. He had a disheveled appearance, and his wagon was decrepit, with all sorts of rags, metal objects and what not hanging out the sides and back, as it rattled along through the alley, pulled by a horse that looked tired. One day, at about the age of 7 or 8, I had the bright idea of throwing a rock at the horse, from behind my grandmother's garage. The rag man was off that wagon so fast, I panicked and ran into the cellar through the side yard door. He followed me right into the cellar and my grandmother started screaming at both of us. He looked startled, and stopped in his tracks. He knew who she was, because she often sold him newspapers and rags. She chased him back outside, and I ended up apologizing. He still scared me, every time he came down the alley. Later on, I found that he came from South Clinton Ave., near Cedar Lane. There was a stable behind an old house. I think he made a good living. I often wondered if there were more rag men, or if he was the only one. Any one remember his name, or anything about him? He was a fixture in Franklin Park, and probably roamed the Burg, too. Another Trenton character from our past. rayfromvillapark

Anonymous said...

Ray:
I have often spoke of the three or four "Rag Men" who plied the streets of Trenton. They were hardworking Jewish men whose sons became prominent in varied professions off the back of thier hard working fathers.
These men lived in my neighborhood of "Jewtown" as often recalled, my brother in law and I would sneak into the stables in an alley beside the Princeton Worsted Mills between Bloomsbury St. and John Fitchway. We would take the "Mighty Steeds" out for a evening cantor along the Deleware River, unbeknowngest to the "Rag Men"
MR. Sikeowitz, Mr.Feinberg, Mr. Weinberg and others plied thier trade pulled along by thier horses.
When I moved to a farm in Ringoes many years ago, I restored the house,and an old horse drawn wagon.
Both were featured in the Trentonian on Christmas day 1982.
As I type, I am looking at the framed article which hangs on my office wall.

Regards to all

Mike Kuzma

A Finkle said...

Trenton's Jews: Beginning, Adaptation and Achieving the American Dream Paperback Arthur L. Finkle
An account of a small industrial city, Trenton, that became a haven for immigrating Jews (German Jews in the 1850’s; and the Russian, Polish, Hungarian and Romanian Jews in 1881-1914). The story delves into the immigrant periods of a displaced people adapting to a completely new environment. It follow its people, its institutions, its work and its eventual economic success. Later, the story line explores the Second Generation of this Russian community, along with the older and smaller German Jewish community, and the amalgamating influences of the Young Men’s Hebrew Association (YMHA) and other secular organizations ‘Americanizing’ the Jewish community. Trenton is one of many small cities that served as havens for Jewish refugees who came to the land of opportunity to eventually achieve the American dream.

For purchase Amazon

http://www.amazon.com/Trentons-Jews-Beginning-Adaptation-Achieving/dp/3639794443/ref=sr_1_2?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1460068027&sr=1-2&keywords=arthur+finkle

For purchase Hadasah Word Press

https://www.morebooks.de/store/gb/book/trenton-s-jews/isbn/978-3-639-79444-1

Trenton's Jews: Beginning, Adaptation and Achieving the American Dream

http://afinkle221.wix.com/trentonsjews2