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Wednesday, April 10, 2013

CA. 1909: "THE TUNNEL" ON PARKWAY AVENUE AND SALLY LOGAN

 It was a daunting engineering fete back in the first decade of the 20th century when Trenton and Mercer County officials tried to figure out a way to open up the western section of the city to the suburbs. Above is the answer to the problem: build a tunnel under the canal! I am including a note from regular visitor Sally Logan Gilman, who tells an interesting story about her experiences with the tunnel. Sally's note was original published a few years ago when this article was posted. Incidentally Sally, I also made the run from Mass. to Trenton on Friday nights back in 1955. However mine were from Fort Devens to Trenton; long before there was an I-95. We came down the Boston Post Road through all those beautiful New England towns.

14 comments:

Sally Logan Gilman said...

Wow -- there's my name in a headline. How great is that! Yes, the tunnel was a beacon for me on my long trip home from Lowell, MA where I had my first reporter's job. It was like a little welcome home sign -- a short distance more, a left onto Carteret, find a parking place and run in. My mother, Sarah Hutchinson Logan, had my favorite spaghetti and a pineapple upside down cake for me. Sunday, I would teach Sunday School at Prospect St. Presbyterian Church, then pack up and head back north for a new work week. I did not like the long drive but my home and Trenton were worth the road time. Thanks again, Tom.

Sally Logan Gilman said...

PS -- it's me again. While we were commuting to and from Trenton, my husband George was commuting to and from McGuire AF Base to Andover, MA. He read your post and reminded me. All this took place in the 50s -- before I knew either of you great guys. Just had to add his little postscript. Thanks again, Tom.

Tom Glover said...

Thank you for your loyalty, Sally, and also thanks for your always interesting comments which add to the historic value of this humble effort to preserve at least some or our culture. By the way, and quite coincidentally, today I am posting an incredibly pristine engraving of the Prospect Presbyterian Church as it looked in 1891. Enjoy; Our Lord still abides within those walls.
Tom

Tony S said...

And headline billing you deserve. This splendid edifice has been a beacon for all of us who resided on Trenton's West side. Going through that tunnel was like entering a new world, trees, hills, beautiful homes and an the main entrance to Cadwalader Park. Junior Three was right down the street. The ball park that is depicted in color is the field of the West End Little League, the one I got the first hit ever when it opened in 1952. Now this was a great post so I thank you both for doing so.

Sally Logan Gilman said...

Tony: It's amazing that a "tunnel'' can evoke such great and deep memories. You are so right -- it was a like a passage into our world. I played tennis at the clay courts at Cadwalader, went to Jr. 3, roller skated all along West State Street and rode my bike to the Acme Mkt. and visited the branch library just a few block away on Hermitage. There is nothing like that left in my world. Thanks to Tom, I can ''talk'' to fellow West Enders like you, Tony. I am grateful for you both. Regards

Tony S said...

And I as well. "Stuck" all the way out here in San Francisco, I love to talk and reflect on those wonderful, long-gone days in Trenton. You have certainly helped to make that possible. I too remember your Trenton travels of which you speak. In fact if you went to the Acme, you were likely to run into me roller skating or riding my bike where Sanhican meets West State St.

RALPH LUCARELLA said...

HAVING WORKED AT THE POST OFFICE AS A LETTER CARRIER IN THE EARLY DAYS, I HAD THE OPPORTUNITY TO WORK THR WESTERN SECTION QUITE OFTEN AND WAS AMAZED AT THE DIFFERENCE FROM LIVING IN CHAMBERSBURG AND THE REST OF TRENTON. BEST REGARDS.

Sally Logan Gilman said...

Weren't those old roller skates great? They clamped to the soles of my shoes and when I took them off the shoes were all curled around the edges and it felt weird to walk. I imagine you too wore your skate key on a string around your neck. What a carefree and wonderful childhood I had. It could not have been better. We were both so lucky. Regards

Tony S said...

Right on the head, literally and figuratively.

Tom Glover said...

Those childhood years you all spent as told in the comments above are like money in the bank and you are now reaping the non financial rewards of spending your leisure hours out under the sun instead of getting carpal tunnel with one of those stupid "dumb..." uhh, "smart phones."
Tom

Sally Logan Gilman said...

Good one Tom -- carpal tunnel.

Anonymous said...

I knew Tony S. as we attended Junior #3 (54) and Trenton High
(57)but that was nearly 60 years ago! I lived along the Power Canal that still flows in my veins and heart and maybe still flows under the grotesque Route 29. I believe the Delaware River, the Delaware Rariton transportation canal and the Power Canal and Assunpink creek were really the heart of Trenton historically and otherwise.
This website is such a delight as we share an experience of place and time.

Judy Smith said...

That tunnel seems like an old friend. How many times I walked through it and then up the cement path to the playground, or through the tunnel to a friend's house on Bellevue, or through the tunnel to go to my grandmother's. We loved to toot the horn when we drove through it. I seem to remember a lot of shouting when we walked through to hear the echoes.

Great memories! And I had been curious about when and how it was built - so really enjoyed the news item!

Judy Smith said...

Sally Logan Gilmore, what years did you live on Carteret and which block? Our family (the Fred Holcombes) lived at 913 Edgewood from 1950 to 1968. Our house backed up to the Slatoff's on Carteret. I have many of the same memories as you of the neighborhood. And you're so right about the tunnel being so evocative!