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Wednesday, August 31, 2011

NEW JERSEY CIVIL WAR REGIMENTAL FLAGS

Many of these regiments were at Camp Olden in Hamilton Township.

1951: WERE WE EVER THIS YOUNG?

As that beautiful love song goes,
"When I fall in love, it will be forever,
or I'll never fall in love.
In a restless world like this is,
love is ended before it's begun,
and too many moonlight kisses,
seem to cool in the warmth of the sun..."
I realize that as I age and approach still another September birthday, and the years just keep piling on and on, and the days, weeks, months and years fly by at an all too rapid rate, I am overtaken by that strange malady that afflicts only a sentimental few of my contemporaries. I am an incurable "nostalgiac." As I look at these yearbook photos from Hamilton High School's 1951 "RETROSPECT" yearbook, warm, and bittersweet emotions overcome me. Fifty seven years of marriage to "Judy Britton," 3 children, 9 grandchildren, and one great-grand child has given me a sense of pride and gratitude when I realize that I did indeed marry my "high school sweetheart."
Irony of ironies: "Our song" was Nat Cole's "Too Young." I smile whenever I sing "our" song,
"....and then someday they may recall,
we were not too young at all."
Anonymous Sally Logan Gilman said...

Hi Tom: I too pore over my high school yearbook, the 1955 Trenton High "Bobashela." I've been gone from Trenton for many, many years but my memories of HS and growing up in our Carteret Avenue home are strong as ever. I love my strolls down Memory Lane. Have a wonderful birthday. Best wishes.
Wednesday, August 31, 2011
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Blogger JoeZ said...

Beautiful words from a great song and it's true the days pass more quickly. Happy Birthday Tom with many more to come to enjoy your lovely wife and family. As we say in Polish "STOLAT."
Wednesday, August 31, 2011

Sunday, August 28, 2011

1934:THE WILLIAM TRENT HOUSE

Thankfully, there were a few historic landmarks that weren't destroyed by past Trenton town fathers. The William Trenton house is probably the most significant historic treasure in the city. As I think of "Old Town" in Philadelphia, I can't help but wonder whatever possessed our Trenton forefathers to destroy all those historical Colonial sites in Trenton that were every bit as precious as those preserved in Philadelphia.

Saturday, August 27, 2011

1983: COLONIAL VFD: THE FIRE COMPANY OF MY CHILDHOOD

It was there when I was a boy during WWII. The scary Colonial siren went off every time there was a fire in our neighborhood, and during those frightening "blackouts" that were part of the scene during the early years of the war when there was thought to be the possibility of an enemy air attack. It was there when I was a teenager and my dear friend Jesse Anderson joined as a volunteer at the tender age of 17. I can still see that blue light and "COLONIAL VFD" emblem on the front of his 1940 Pontiac sedan. Memories of Chief John Lenhardt with the stump of a lit cigarette burning every closer to his lips. "Big John," who was the consummate Fire Chief; always ready, any hour, day or night. It was the boys in his family, all of whom I seem to recall becoming dedicated fire fighters. It was young John, moving to the Mercerville area and becoming Chief of that fire company after serving at Colonial. The memories just keep on coming.

Thursday, August 25, 2011

1950 AND 1955: "BATTEN DOWN THE HATCHES, HERE COMES IRENE!"

I have witnessed numerous "Super Storms" and Hurricanes in my 77 years of existence. I was was up in Fort Devens, Massachusetts when "Diane" hit, and I and my two fellow radio operators decided to head to Trenton in my buddy John Wilkie's 1941 Chevy. We had just dropped off Mike Byers in Yonkers, N.Y. and headed further south as Diane headed further north. Fortunately, the angels that God appoints to watch over G.I.'s was riding shotgun. We managed to reach our destination after 3 extra hours of travel over flooded streets. So here I am 56 years later, ready to batten down the hatches for Hurricane "Irene" who is predicted to brush up against the east coast.
From Ed Millerick, Thursday, August 25, 2011:
I remember "Diane" well, I was about seven and Dad took us around the town. I remember fireman evacuating folks on Front Street by boats and seeing Stacy Park under water. They were pumping out the State House too since the lower level was under water.
Anonymous Joe Lind said...

I remember that storm as well,I was 9 years old, My uncle lived on Green St and Delmoor Ave in Morrisville Pa, We had to rescue him from his roof by row boat.
The Yardley to Ewing bridge was also lost.
I don't know what is more nerve racking waiting for this storm or a Blizzard with 30 plus inches of snow.
What do you think?.

Friday, August 26, 2011
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Anonymous Anonymous said...

Joe, I start to think about how much storms are hyped by the media. I does keep us glued to the set and I will start to think "same old, same old", but then remember 1955 and 62 and the loss of a few friends. That bridge that was lost was just about where the Yardley Inn stands wasn't it?

There is about 15 gallons of gas stored and the Honda generator is ready to go. For a ten minute ride it is worth the peace of mind. In Washington Crossing our house was the very last one on the JCP&L power grid and some storms kept us without lights or heat for a few days. Now imagine looking out and seeing the home right next door with lights and heat because they were PSE&G. Up here in Hunterdon it is rare to go more than a day without electricity but in an ice storm that little Honda is wonderful for peace of mind.

The little boy in me still loves a raging storm but I still respect what Mother Nature can dish out.

Ed Millerick

God speed and as much as nature will allow .. smooth sailing. That Glover fellow; seems to have a nice cut to his jib don't cha' think? A fine host he is so I'll hoist a mug of cyber rum to his Fandango. Cheers to you Capn' Glover!

Friday, August 26, 2011

Tuesday, August 23, 2011

1939: ARTISAN STREET IN THE WESTERN SECTION OF TRENTON

Artisan Street is a name one seldom hears any more. It is a block away from Edgewood Avenue intersecting with Bellevue Avenue. The photo is from a collection I received many years ago from Mr. Bob Kelly who worked for a municipality in maintaining area roads. The Bing map shows the area as it is today from a copter's aerial view.

Monday, August 22, 2011

1941: KUSER SCHOOL CLASS OF 1941

The graphic above is a cut and paste,. page by page vignette of the very sumptuous Kuser School yearbook, typical of the yearbooks of that era. My brother Bill "Bud" Glover was in that class, as was our neighbor June Soffel (Funari). Memories abound; I remember how thrilled my mom was to see this very nice grammar school heirloom.

Thursday, August 18, 2011

1923: JOHN CLEARY'S VINTAGE CHAMBERSBURG

This graphic may not be of interest to those who are not interested in early local history relating to the evolution of today's neighborhoods. It is one of my favorite subjects, and any time I find truly pertinent articles and photos they will be digitized and saved. The above article is by John Cleary, my very favorite Trenton Times historical writer. Mr. Cleary lived during the time that many 19th century area residents were still alive to tell their stories. The above Camp Perrine information is completely captivating.

1948 (Circa 1948) CHET KUZMA AT WETZEL FIELD

Ralph Lucarella, Chet Kuzma, Noel Goeke, Reynold Funari, and many visitors to this blog are members of "The Greatest Generation." I have enormous respect for those Americans who grew up in the very depths of the Great Depression, many of whom served our country during the horror that was World War II, too many of them making the ultimate sacrifice. I try very hard to take the extra time to acquire good quality photos and articles and the extra time to embellish them via "Photoshop" in order to allow visitors to copy them into their computers for their photo albums, scrap books, family heirlooms etc. The photo of Chet Kuzma that his son Ron sent me was scanned at 600 dots per inch and was of exquisite quality. As I looked at it's full size, you could actually determine that Chet is wearing a wool baseball uniform!Thanks again, Ron. Your Dad, along with many other persons who appear on this website are preserved for posterity, or at least as long as www.glover320.blogspot survives!
Ralph Lucarella said...

HI TOM AND RON....CHET KUZMA PLAYED ABOUT THE SAME TIME AS MY BROTHER "CHUCK". THAT WAS IN 1948 WHEN I WAS IN THE POST OFFICE AND MY BROTHER WAS PLAYING WITH THE SCHROTHS IN THE AMERICAN LEGION TOURNAMENTS. THAT'S A GREAT SHOT OF CHET AT WETZEL FIELD. THOSE BASEBALL UNIFORMS WERE MADE OF FLANNEL AND WERE VERY HOT. WETZEL FIELD'S CLUB HOUSE WAS STILL UP WHEN I LAST VISITED IN 2007. BEST REGARDS.
Blogger Michael said...

Tom:

Just got back from aa week at my beach house where computers are verboten! Immediately sat down to check you column, and darn you did it again. This past week was spent with my son Mike Jr. from Pennington, and my beautiful little grand daughter Emil, along with Son David and my grandson Aleksander. Don't you think we were trying to tell the kids about our "Cousins" 1st, 2nd and 3rd's. Of Course Chet's name came up, and here you publish this great photo. Chet of course was my hero, and I had bragging rights on him. I also went to Jr. Four with his sister Lillian. I noted before, that Chet's Dad; Pete was raised by my grandmother, and assumed the family name when he migrated from Poland.
A wonderful family who we were all proud to be related too.

Thanks again.

Mike Kuzma

Friday, August 19, 2011

1948 (Circa 1948) Chet Kuzma at Wetzel field


I received the above email from Ron Kuzma who saw the photo of his Dad, Chet Kuzma in an earlier Glover320 post. Ron sent me this circa 1948 photo of his dad Chet at Wetzel field. Many thanks, Ron.
I am also posting your email requesting the addresses of Ralph and Mike, both of whom are regular
visitors to this website. They will undoubtedly be contacting you. Thanks again for visiting this website.
I hope you return often.
Blogger Michael said...

Tom: Thanks for publishing Ron Kuzma's email address. Immediately upon reading the posting,I wrote to him. Wow you have reunited me with my cousin Arlene Marren, now Chet Kuzma's son. You are a real treasure. Keep up the great work. Mike
Saturday, August 20, 2011

THANKS, MIKE; IT'S NICE TO BRING FRIENDS AND RELATIVES TOGETHER. "LOCAL HISTORY WITH A PERSONAL TOUCH."

TOM

Wednesday, August 17, 2011

1897: CHRIST P.E. CHURCH GROWING

The building occupied by Christ P.E. Church is now occupied by an Hispanic church and day care center. Before the church was constructed, the earliest parishioners met at Kirk's Hall, on corner of Hamilton Avenue and Hudson Street, across the street from the old Hamilton Avenue M.E. Church. There was an unfortunate schism in the original Christ P.E. Church back in the 1960's, resulting in most of the congregation leaving and moving to those who favor the more conservative Anglican church's keeping the original 1928 Book of Common Prayer.

Tuesday, August 16, 2011

1920: HARRY PODMORE ON THE D & R CANAL

Always a fascinating subject. The area history is full of romantic stories of life on the canal as the boats plied the waters with cargo of sand, coal, bricks, cobblestones, and other early commerce.

1936: SCHROTH'S PRACTICING AT HETZEL FIELD

There you are again, Ralph Lucarella! Right in there with all of Trenton's notable baseball players in the 1930's. I would bet that you, and many other visitors will find many old friends and acquaintances in the lengthy listing of candidates. I see Harold "Bus" Saidt among the players listed.
Blogger Ralph Lucarella said...

HI TOM....BUS SAIDT AND I WERE BOTH SELECTED TO PLAY ON THE 1936 SCHROTHS TEAM. IT WAS AT A TIME WHEN THE HAMILTON LEGION HAD A VERY STRONG TEAM AND DEFEATED US FOR THE FIRST TIME. THE SCHROTHS WENT TO THE STATE FINALS EACH YEAR BEFORE THAT BUT IN THAT GAME PLAYED AT THE CADWALADER PARK FIELD, THEY REALLY PLAYED GREAT. IT WAS GREAT TO BE CONNECTED TO THE SCHROTHS TEAM AND LATTER ON, MY BROTHER "CHUCK" WENT ON TO PLAY ON THE 1948 SCHROTHS WHEN THEY WON THE AMERICAN LEGION WORLD SERIES IN INDIANAPOLIS. BUS SAIDT BROADCASTED THAT GAME BACK TO TRENTON AND WE FELT VERY PROUD TO BE THERE WITH MANY OTHER TRENTON PEOPLE. BEST REGARDS.
Tuesday, August 16, 2011

1930: FRED SCULLY; I REMEMBER HIM WELL


On our many visits to Wetzel Field back in the middle of the 20th century, my buddy Don Slabicki and I often saw then white haired Fred Scull y doing something baseball; either managing, coaching or just plain visiting. He was a local baseball legend.
Ralph Lucarella said...

HI AGAIN TOM....FRED SCULLY WAS ONE OF THE MOST ACTIVE AMONG ALL THE PEOPLE INVOLVED IN THE CENTRAL JERSEY LEAGUE. I RECALL ALL HIS TEAMS AND EACH ONE REPRESENTED HAMILTON AS ONE OF THE BEST.

1981: TOM GLOVER'S "HI TECH" LAP TOP COMPUTER

Many things remind me that I am getting old! I started out over 70 years ago using a green "Dixon Ticonderoga" grammar school pencil. Then I and my contemporaries were issued "straight pens" with a cork finger grip. We dipped the pen into that ink well that was on the top right of every school desk. As we matured, we moved up to the upper classes where we used fountain pens and of course, pencils. At high school we were introduced to the manual typewriter. The electric was still a writer's dream. Into the top secret U.S.Army Security Agency where I was issued a typewriter that the army called a "Mill;" which was devoid of lower case letters; upper case only. Three years of "cloak and dagger" top secret typewriter output found me discharged and into a tragically dead end bearing business career where I began typing invoices on a "manual" typewriter. I pause here to marvel at the very gradual advances in literary and writing technology that I had experienced. Along came the electric typewriter. The transition from manual to electric was accompanied by a somewhat steep learning curve. Trying to remember that the electric typewriter no longer required a manual carriage return, and trying to keep your fingers from repeating key strokes. Hi tech electrics had the revolutionary automatic carriage return. Then, miracle of miracles, along came the "Sinclair," "Atari" "Radio Shack" and other dabblers in very early computing. Here we move into the latter stages of my journalistic career with the advent of the very early personal computer. When I started writing for the Mercer Messenger 30 years ago, I initially used a pencil and yellow lined paper to write a basic manuscript, moving paragraphs and sentences by circling them and arrowing them to their new location. Then came the electronic typewriter. Mine was a Brother which used a heat transfer system to print a page. It was also the first time I had a "spell-checker" and correction feature. And now to put a cherry on top of this rather verbose journalistic chronology, along came the Epson in the illustration above. I thought I achieved the ultimate in journalistic technology! The rest is recent history.

1890: CHAMBERSBURG'S IMMACULATE CONCEPTION CHURCH


Fifty plus years of historic research has shown that nearly every large church in the Trenton area at one time has a steeple or steeples as in the case of Immaculate. Over the years, most of those steeples came crashing to the ground during heavy storms. The Hamilton Square Presbyterian Church, Trenton's First Baptist Church, and many others yielded to the ferocity of mother nature's stormy wrath. The original Immaculate as illustrated in the engraving must have been a magnificent site on Chestnut Avenue in the early years. Today, Rev. Father Jeff Lee's Our Lady of Angels - Immaculate Conception-St. Joachim churches have moved into the second century of ministering to their respective flocks.
Anonymous Carlo said...

Hello Tom, I really enjoyed the
above article about Immaculate Conception Church..As far as I know, the steeples shown in the original graphic were never built due to lack of funds. They would have made a beautiful church even more magnificent. Stay well anf keep up your good work!

Wednesday, August 17, 2011

Monday, August 15, 2011

1934: GRADUATING CLASS OF 1934 IMMACULATE CONCEPTION HIGH SCHOOL

I would venture to say that at least one or perhaps more visitors to this page will recognize a friend, relative, or neighbor who was in the class photo above.
Blogger
Mack said...
Great sruff Tom:)
I love posts with a bunch of Burg family names and pictures. Almost always there are relatives of people I grew up with and went to school with back in the day:)

Tuesday, August 16, 2011

Blogger Tom Glover said...
THANKS, MACK. ONE OF THE GOALS OF THIS WEBSITE IS POSTING GRAPHICS WITH WHICH MANY VISITORS CAN RELATE. THAT'S IN KEEPING WITH MY GOAL OF PROVIDING "LOCAL HISTORY WITH A PERSONAL TOUCH." THANKS FOR BEING SUCH A LOYAL VISITOR.

TOM GLOVER

REMEMBERING THAT WOOD AND COAL BURNING KITCHEN STOVE


THIS IS A "RERUN" OF AN EARLIER POST
INCLUDING VISITOR COMMENTS.
FEEL FREE TO ADD YOURS!
Ours was a "Wincroft," but much the same as the "Baron" in the engraving above. You have piled on the years if you remember this beast with cast iron legs and body. Our Wincroft didn't always burn coal as it was built to do. During the Glover years of poverty, we had the dead wood from Kuser Farm to substitute for our normal ton of chestnut coal from Henry Liedtka. To those of my visitors who are not familiar with that old relic, you will notice that there are circular lines on the top of the stove. They were lifted off with a special tool and the coal or wood was dropped into the furnace. I remember lifting one of the lids, putting a fork on a piece of bread and toasting it over the fire. Our mothers and grandmothers had to be very ingenious to learn how much time to leave that turkey or bread, or other oven-baked meals in that oven on the lower right. There were not electronic timers back then. What is not shown in the engraving is the galvanized chimney pipe which was fitted on the back of the stove and vented into the house's chimney. Right up to the 1940's I remember coming home from school on a cold winter day, sit at the kitchen table and smell the delightful aroma of a pot of Mom Glover's home made chicken soup.
Ralph Lucarella said...

Hi Tom: I'm one senior who remembers the coal stove and furnace era. It was a lot of work to get up early to remove the ashes from the furnace. The kitchen stove and the grate on the living room floor was about all we had to heat the house. My dad made good use of the stove, he'd grill a steak over the coal fire much like we do today on our outdoor grills. A very large portion of the cellar was used to store the coal. There was no way of getting heat on the 2nd floor without space heaters. This is another example of today's seniors calling our generation the greatest cause they've seen the big difference in the life styles of today. Regards, Ralph

Ralph Lucarella said...

Hi again Tom: I might add that the wealthy people had hot water heat with radiators in every room. My ambition years ago was to own a house with hot water heat. that was accomplished when we bought a house on Marshall ave. in Mercerville in 1959. We not only had radiators but the furnace was an oil burner. Congradulations with the response from the seniors on your Times article.

JoeB said...

Ralph: No heat on the second floor? We were fornuate, my grandfather was a baker and he would bring home oven bricks which we warmed in the oven of the coal stove to take to bed at night to keep our feet warm.

Tom Glover said...

Yeah guys. But what about us poor country folks who didn't have any heat other than the old coal furnace down in the basement. My brothers were growing up during the depression and had to sleep in the attic. They said ice would form in their water glasses on cold winter nights. There was no insulation on the roof and walls of our thrid floor attic, only rafters. Brrrr! Tom Glover

2011: READING OUTSIDE OUR CLASS ROOM

I am an obsessive reader. If I don't have my Trenton Times, Trentonian, or New York Post at my breakfast table, you will probably find me reading the back of my "Wheaties" box. Reading, writing and penmanship were very important parts of our Kuser grammar school education. Even though the Bobbsey Twins" were more or less favored by the girls, we boys found very interesting reading as we read of the exploits of Bert, Nan, Freddie and Flossie Bobbsey. The bad boy Danny Rugby appealed to boys as we saw him get his just desserts in each volume. Long before I could read, my sister Dorothy read the Bobbsey Twins books to me at bed time. When I developed that still treasured ability to read on my own, I read each and every Bobbsey Twins book I could find. Naturally, my reading tastes were enhanced by my Kuser School teachers who subjected us to "Uncle Tom's Cabin," "Little Men," "Robin Hood," and countless other volumes that appealed to the younger generation. I have a bookcase full of vintage children's books from the "Buddy" series to the "Tom Swift" series, and the more advanced volumes by Naturalist author Ernest Thompson Seton and countless others who have made reading a necessary and joyful experience all my life. The generation who followed me found a similar source in the "Nancy Drew" and "Hardy Boys" series. I have just started re-reading some of those old volumes. The "Bobbsey Twins in the Country" is a bittersweet and nostalgic trip back to my childhood, which gives me a strange, almost spiritual experience.

Friday, August 12, 2011

1843l HENRY McCALL'S PAPER MILL ON THE ASSANPINK

It is very difficult to imagine that huge 3 story building being along the Assanpink in today's Mill Hill section. The very interesting caption to this very old extract is from the early 20th century when they had not perfected offset printing. The original is really very washed out. Photoshop enhancements improved the picture, but like most photos from the early years, it was difficult to see details.

2011: H.D. LEE - A LEGENDARY TRENTON INDUSTRY

The H.D. Lee company was one of Trenton's foremost industrial companys back in the 20th century. With the shift in labor from the northeast to the south where labor was substantially lower, many industries left the area where they could produce on a more profitable level. Then along came overseas competition, and knocked out the southern labor market as industries moved off shore to China, Taiwan and other foreign venues.As I recall. H.D. Lee made "UNION-ALLS." a working man's denim overall.

Blogger Ralph Lucarella said...

HI TOM...H.D. LEE CO. OVER ON E, STATE ST. WAS A THRIVING COMPANY FOR YEARS AND PROVIDED MANY PEOPLE IN THE BURG WITH JOBS. THEY WERE ONE OF MANY OUTSTANDING COMPANIES WE HAD IN THE CITY AND WERE INCLUDED IN THE SAYING "TRENTON MAKES THE WORLD TAKES". REGARDS.
Friday, August 12, 2011
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Blogger John E. B Good said...

One of my grandmother's sisters worked there. Wish I still had the Lee Overall Doll!
Saturday, August 13, 2011
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Anonymous Anonymous said...

The great thing about Lee, was not only their quality, and styling, but back in the late 40's and early 50's you cold go to the factory and buy overuns, or 2nd's of the famous "Lee Rider" boot cut jeans for a dollar. This was during my Carney Rose Cowboy days. I would love to fit into a pair of the slim legged jeans once more. Ah youth, it's so fleeting!!! Regards Mike Kuzma