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Friday, December 30, 2011

1946: COUNT FELIX: A LOCAL LEGEND

Thanks Mike McNicol for correcting me with my statement that Fexlix was involved with "Centanni" in Chambersburg. I have no idea where that idea came from. I have never been to any of his gigs. This ad is from a December 1946 Trenton Times Christmas-New Year page.
Babs said...
Thanks for posting this ad. Count Felix was my talented, fun-loving Uncle Felix. He had his bar on Anderson Street with my Aunt Etta. I never made it there as an adult patron, but enjoyed his musical abilities, pranks and jokes growing up. I wonder if you remember my mother and her two sisters from THS. Evelyn, Ruth, and Etta Davidow?
Tom, thank you for what you do. I work with many historical societies as a book designer for Applewood Books in Carlisle, Massachusetts.

Barbara DaSilva

Many thanks for the interesting insight, Babs. It is much appreciated. Thank you for visiting my blog. I hope you return often. As to the Evelyn, Ruth and Etta Davidow, as a Hamilton High class of 51 alumnus I only recognize the Davidow name.
Tom Glover

mments:

Michael said...
Tom:

Hate to correct such an expert as you, but in the past year, I sent you a post, clarifying the mistake with Felix Nowicki.
He was not with Centanni, that was an Italian bar located a few blocks away behing Merlo Printing
Co. just steps off So. Clinton near Liberty,and behind the old Prior Donuts.
Felix, who I knew well had as his neice says, a "fun" bar at the corner of Woodland, and Anderson. A few blocks from Cent'ani, which if memory serves me means "100 years" in Italian. Typcially said as "Chen Don" when toasting a goomba, or Paisan.
Felix's brother Eddie was an appraiser who worked for me at one time and came from a proud Polish background.
The Davidow's were in the Wallpaper business.

Mike Kuzma
Anonymous said...
My father was a regular with Count Felix and consequently, I accompanied him on many, many occasions. The phone that squirted water in your face, the quarter that was permanently glued to the bar. The "robot" at the front door whose hand would find its way where it didn't belong on an unsuspecting customer. The microphone in the "john." Felix was a phenomenal musician who saw the hilarity of everyday life. He had a theater organ in the middle of the bar he would play at night. My mother sang with him accompanying and my father, who didn't know a note of music was challenged by Felix to play a piano duet. Felix taught him music and my father studied and eventually played with him. I got my start in music because of his mentoring and made a career of it. A very excellent remembrance. Thank you Tom!

Warren Rue

6 comments:

Michael said...

Tom:

Hate to correct such an expert as you, but in the past year, I sent you a post, clarifying the mistake with Felix Nowicki.
He was not with Centanni, that was an Italian bar located a few blocks away behing Merlo Printing
Co. just steps off So. Clinton near Liberty,and behind the old Prior Donuts.
Felix, who I knew well had as his neice says, a "fun" bar at the corner of Woodland, and Anderson. A few blocks from Cent'ani, which if memory serves me means "100 years" in Italian. Typcially said as "Chen Don" when toasting a goomba, or Paisan.
Felix's brother Eddie was an appraiser who worked for me at one time and came from a proud Polish background.
The Davidow's were in the Wallpaper business.

Mike Kuzma

Anonymous said...

My father was a regular with Count Felix and consequently, I accompanied him on many, many occasions. The phone that squirted water in your face, the quarter that was permanently glued to the bar. The "robot" at the front door whose hand would find its way where it didn't belong on an unsuspecting customer. The microphone in the "john." Felix was a phenomenal musician who saw the hilarity of everyday life. He had a theater organ in the middle of the bar he would play at night. My mother sang with him accompanying and my father, who didn't know a note of music was challenged by Felix to play a piano duet. Felix taught him music and my father studied and eventually played with him. I got my start in music because of his mentoring and made a career of it. A very excellent remembrance. Thank you Tom!

Warren Rue

Tom Glover said...

Date: 1/7/2012, 10:38 AM, EST
FROM Claire Dwier Zarr

Hi Tom,
Catching up on your site after the holiday rush, I read your post about Count Felix. It brought back so many wonderful memories of him, Etta and his brother Eddie. My late husband, Bob, and I spent many enjoyable hours at Felix's bar on Anderson St. when we were dating in the late '60's. We so admired and appreciated his musical talent, and he never disappointed whenever we requested our two favorite songs. Felix actually played an instrumental part (no pun intended) in encouraging our relationship to grow - he acted like he was the proud papa when we told him were were getting married. After marriage and our first child, as many couples do, we didn't get out too often, so didn't see Felix for several years after he had closed down his bar. We stopped in at the Marroe Inn one night when he was appearing there. The Count spotted us sitting at the bar almost immediately. He stopped playing, asked the other patrons to excuse him for a moment and came over to greet us. When he went back to continue his work, the first two songs he played were the two favorites of ours we had always requested at his bar. We were so touched and surprised that he had remembered. Some thought Felix had a gruff personality, but I always knew that, behind all the craziness he created, and the talent he had, he had a very soft heart - and he proved it again that night. He was a wonderful and talented man who kept us laughing and loving him for many years. Thanks again for the memories, Tom.

THANKS YOU CLAIRE FOR THE WARM MEMORIES YOU HAVE OF THE COUNT. THANKS ALSO FOR YOUR LOYALTY TO THIS BLOG OVER THE YEARS.
XO
TOM GLOVER

Babs said...

you all are bringing tears to my eyes. Felix played at my wedding reception and refused to take a break for food or drink. Always that cigar, though. Thank you as the memories now come rushing back and fill me with love.

Barbara

p.s. yes, as I mentioned the Davidow sisters, the family business was wallpaper and awnings in Trenton.

Ron Bound said...

Davidows, and wallpaper business. One of the smartest kids in my class at Trenton High, in 53-54, was Joel Davidow. Wonder if it's the same family. Ron

Anonymous said...

Tom, I was interested to see the comments on the "Count". I enjoyed him very much. I was also interested to see the comment on Veldofs. Our Hamilton "51 classmate Bob Scheutz played there often. Terry