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Thursday, December 30, 2010

1948 AND 2011: GLOBAL WARMING.....HMMMM!

As I reach the portals of senior citizenship, I still love the snow, but unlike my younger years, I no longer go
"belly flopping" on my steel runner sled. (Note: I could never afford that "Flexible Flyer.") I have closely watched today's kids, and they are all outfitted with that newfangled molded plastic where they sit on their sled and slide down the hill. Belly flopping is much more exciting and far more fun...a  running gallop, an airborne leap in the air with our trusty sled, our bodies following close behind. We land on the sled while in motion, the sled's steel runners skimming through the snow at breakneck speed, and we are on an exhilarating and very speedy ride to the bottom of the hill.

1899: TRENTON'S OTHER, EARLIER "BIJOU" THEATER

Vaudeville was king back when the Bijou Theater held forth on North Broad near Perry. As stated in an earlier post, I speculate that the site of the old Bijou was the same as the site subsequently taken over by the proprietors of the old Garden Theater.

1914: TRENTON THEATERS AND THEATER OWNERS

Note that many of the names listed above as theater owners does not list the name of the theater. I have highlighted hose that are named.

1944: TRENTON G.I.'s MEET IN WWII ITALY

As you can see by the 300,000-plus "hits" on this blog, there are many visitors who are interested in history, genealogy, or just plain love to page through the thousands of posts that have been added to this blog over the past 5 years. Who knows where technology will lead us in this ever-changing era of electronic miracles? It has been my goal to post local interest material ranging from nostalgic to historic, to photos and articles that relate personally to our many visitors. There are literally millions of pages found in the huge (and heavy) volumes in the Hamilton Township Public Library's Local History Collection. Indeed, at my ripe old age of 77 going on 78, the source material will outlive me by many years. Future archivists will add still more, and I suspect succeeding archivists will continue to add to this incredible database of history, nostalgia and other things ephemeral. As I continue on this monumental journey, we will be viewing photos of local people who served in WWI, WWII, and the Korean War, grammar and high school articles and photos, views of our area long before we were here, and other posts calculated to spur your imagination. Unfortunately, my collection ends in the early 1940's. However, you will agree that there are many hidden historic secrets still to be uncovered in my collection of papers that begin in 1868 up to the early 1940's.

Wednesday, December 29, 2010

1909: THE NEW BIJOU OPENS APRIL 17, 1909

The Bijou was always one of my favorite movie houses. Even though it was quite a walk from way over by Kuser Park to the South Clinton Avenue theater, we made the walk on numerous occasions. The Bijou always seemed to get much better movies than our local Gaiety and Greenwood.

Did you know that there was another Bijou theater before this Chambersburg Bijou. Back in the early 20th century another Bijou was located on North Broad near Perry Street. It is complete speculation on my part, but I would bet that the old Garden Theater took up that spot.when the theater closed. The North Broad Street Bijou was a vaudeville theater. Stay tuned. More to come on Trenton's interesting theater history. Look for future posts featuring the "Double B"theater the Nicolette, and others that repose in the deep dark recesses of my "THEATERS-TRENTON" folder.

Tuesday, December 28, 2010

1930'S: MIRIAM MORRIS : WHITE HORSE "STRINGER" FOR THE TRENTON TIMES

A "stringer" is a writer who contracts with local newspapers and furnishes news from the neighborhood where he or she resides. Miriam Morris was a stringer for the Trenton Times. I have an incredibly detailed scrapbook from Mrs. Morris which has countless White Horse related news items from the area as it was reported in the 1930's. Unfortunately, Mrs. Morris didn't date many of her articles. Hence, the Circa 1930's dates until actual dates are determined.

2010 JUDITH LEDGER, THIS ONE'S FOR YOU AND OTHER HHS ALUMNI AND THE HHS NAME CHANGE



Ms. Judith Mazilli Ledger wrote in my guest book, asking if anyone knows where the "Watson" name in Hamilton High originated:

Judith:
Regarding your 12/'28 guest book query as to the origin of HHS-Watson, and where that appendage came from:
I would assume it is named for "Pop" Watson, a truant officer during my years at HHS.

I am receiving numerous emails offering tee shirts, caps etc. with Hamilton High "Watson-West."  I am an alumnus of Hamilton High before the name change, and prefer to remain so. No disrespect meant to the late Pop Watson, nor those Hornets who are alumni from "West."

Tom Glover





1936: HAPPY NEW YEAR!

Many of the eateries, saloons,bars, and restaurants in the above graphic are no longer with us. However, it's fun to look over the list and the depression era prices for a night that I always stayed up to experience.....uhh, wait, let me expand on that statement. I loved to welcome in the New Year with Guy Lombardo's Royal Canadians, and that old New Years eve standard, "Should Auld Acquaintance be forgot." I abandoned ship when they decided to bring in Dick Clark, did away with that "treacly" (sugary, syrupy)  music, and decided we all wanted a "Rockin' New Years Eve." No thanks, I'll pass on that privilege. I prefer that treacly, syrupy music instead raucous noise.

Tuesday, December 21, 2010

1934: PROMINENT, NOTABLE, FAMOUS TRENTONIANS OF THE PAST

For those who are interested in the history of Trenton, E.C. Hill's list of notable and famous Trentonians from the 19th and 20th century will be of interest. In my comprehensive study of Trenton's past, I see many local residents who have added their input to the magnificent history of New Jersey's capitol city.

1911: CHRISTMAS AT TRENTON'S PROSPECT PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH

The old photo of Prospect Presbyterian is from "Trenton Illustrated;" a pictorial treasure with exquisite engravings of scenes in and around Trenton in 1891. Note the un-paved Prospect Street in the foreground. Many old Trenton families attended this beautiful church in the 19th and 20th century. Unfortunately, "white flight" resulted in the Presbyterians abandoning the beautiful historic structure. One wonders if God still abides in the old church with a new religious group has taking over the historic house of worship.
Anonymous Sally Logan Gilman said...
Hi Tom: What a thrill to see my Prospect St. Pres. Church in its early glory days. My parents, Sarah Hutchinson and Russell Logan were married there. They always took me to Sunday School and I sang in the choir and taught Sunday school when I got older. We have driven by whenever we came to Trenton and it breaks my heart. I will always remember how welcoming it was and how happy my family was when we walked through the front door. Again, thanks for the memories.
Tuesday, December 21, 2010

Monday, December 20, 2010

1950: HAMILTON LOSES A SPORTS LEGEND

Jake Tarr was a year ahead of me in Hamilton High's Class of 1950. Even then, he was a sports talent, excelling in baseball, soccer, and basketball. I will be posting his obit as soon as I process it. To Jake's family and also to my class of 1951 classmate and brother of Jake, know that he is in our prayers. The graphic above lists those from the class of 1950 who have gone to be with the Lord; may they Rest In Peace. 

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Blogger Ralph Lucarella said...
HI TOM....JAKE TARR WAS A GOOD FRIEND, FELLOW ATHLETE AND A GREAT CUSTOMER OF THE HAMILTON BOWLING LANES WHILE WE HAD IT. I ALWAYS FELT HE WOULD HAVE BEEN ONE OF OUR BETTER PROFESSIONALS WHILE HE WAS PLAYING BALL. I NOTICED THE NUMEROUS COMMENTS OF HIS STUDENTS IN THE TIMES OBITUARY. MAY GOD BLESS HIM AND MAY HE REST IN PEACE. REGARDS.
Tuesday, December 21, 201

1934: CHRISTMAS GREETINGS FROM DEPRESSION ERA TRENTON NEW JERSEY

This page was printed a year before I was born. However, in listening to my Mom and Dad when they were with us, the early 1930's were really tough times for our family and I dare say many families during those years of the Great Depression. The newspapers didn't focus on the depression, rather, they tried to focus on the positive aspects of those dark years. I took the liberty of adding a hearty "MERRY CHRISTMAS" to all the many visitors to this blog. I hope you all have a delightful Christmas day, and a very happy 2011.
Anonymous Sally Logan Gilman said...
Greetings Tom: I got all the way to the end before I recognized a name. It was Slatoff -- Mr. and Mrs. Slatoff and their children lived opposite our home on Carteret Avenue. It was fun to see the name. I wish you and your family a very Merry Christmas and a joyful and happy 2011.
Monday, December 20, 2010

Saturday, December 18, 2010

1934: EWING TOWNSHIP'S LANNING SCHOOL

From the EWING TOWNSHIP folder, this combination of an old architectural drawing of the proposed new Lanning School with the listing of students of the school with perfect attendance during November, 1934. I have highlighted my Sister in Law, Florence Adam. There are many familiar names in the school. Ed Gainsborg was my boss during my years working at the old Trenton Bearing Company at 1812 North Olden Avenue.

Thursday, December 16, 2010

1934: ROWAN SCHOOL PUPILS LISTED FOR HONORS AND ATTENDANCE

What do these old grammar school student listing have to do with local history? Well, first of all, it is posts such as these that gives a listing of some of the older residents of our area "back in the day." This type of listing will always be a part of this blog for the benefit not only of genealogists, but those of us who remember many of the family names listed. I personally found over 25 names that were related to students who were familiar names during my years at Kuser grammar school and Hamilton High School before it became Hamilton High School West Watson.
Anonymous Anonymous said...
THANKS, TOM...IN READING THIS I FOUND MY FATHER'S SIBLINGS AND REALIZED THAT, IN 1934, THEY WERE LIVING IN BROAD STREET PARK AREA WHILE MY MOM'S SISTER [ANNABELLE AVE] WAS ALSO IN ATTENDANCE AT THE SAME SCHOOL THOUGH MY PARENTS DIDN'T MEET UNTIL THE LATE 30'S AND NEVER KNEW THAT THERE WAS A CONNECTION AS EARLY AS 1934. WONDERFUL "TREAT" FOR MY FAMILY'S GENEALOGY...KATHY
Sunday, December 19, 2010
THANK YOU KATHY. I'M ALWAYS HAPPY TO HEAR FROM A VISITOR WHO HAS FOUND A RELEVANT POST THAT TIES IN WITH A FAMILY MEMBER.  THANKS ALSO FOR VISITING; I HOPE YOU RETURN OFTEN.
TOM GLOVER

1927 SANBORN PLAT MAP GROVEVILLE TEXTILE MILLS

Here's a rare glimpse of "Grovevilliana" from 1927 showing the layout of that historic little village as it looked along the bend in Crosswicks Creek. Note that the Anchor Thread Company has Mercer Textile Mills as a neighboring industry. Groveville historian Gary Lippincott has an extensive Groveville page at  http://www.grovevillememories.blogspot.com; check it out.

Wednesday, December 15, 2010

1934: STERN'S: ANOTHER TRENTON TOYLAND

I can't say I had any experience with Stern's. The Glover family seemed to prefer Goldberg's, Gimbels, Swern's, S.S. Kresge, and F.W. Woolworth for Christmas shopping. The Sun Ray store was where the stocking stuffers came from.

Blogger Ralph Lucarella said...
HI TOM.....STERN'S WAS MOSTLY A FURNITURE STORE ON NO. BROAD ST AND COMPETED WITH HURLEY-TOBIN'S FOR YOUR NEEDS. WE BOUGHT OUR FIRST BEDROOM SUITE FROM HURLEY'S THAT CONSISTED OF FOUR PIECES AND MATTRESS FOR $99.00. MERRY XMAS.
Thursday, December 16, 2010

1934: TRENTON POLICE ASSIGNED TO TRENTON PARK AREAS

"Rowdyism;" How the picture has changed over the years! Today, rowdyism has evolved into near anarchy in Camden, Newark, Trenton, and other New Jersey cities and is even infecting many suburban areas. The crime situation in 21st century America has altered the lifestyle of many citizens, not the least of which is the local police departments. The officers above were assigned to the many parks in the Trenton area, with the goal being to contain "rowdyism."

1934: CHRISTMAS IN DOWNTOWN TRENTON

This was a bit before my time, but I do recall the incredible adventure it was as a boy to take a trip "up town" with my Mom to pay bills and do some Christmas shopping. We would step off the bus at State and Broad Street and immediately wafting through the air in an enormous adventure of aromatherapy, we would breathe in the aroma of a winter day in downtown Trenton. Hot dogs and hamburgers from nearby restaurant grills, brewing coffee, roasting peanuts from the "Nut House," and the diesel exhaust from our Trenton Transit bus mingled with Christmas carols and the Salvation Army's Santa ringing his bell: an experience that I remember to this day. 
Anonymous Anonymous said...
I was born in 1940, but my parents and I would go uptown on Thursday nights when they were open till 9 pm. It was probably the late 1940's to the 50's. Since I eventually attended Cathedral High School, I was uptown every day. One of my memories is the the gentleman who was an amputee and he got around on a board with small wheels and he sold pencils by the newsstand on State & Broad. Another memory is the two brothers who went through the neighborhood playing a herty gerty. Not to mention the "ragman" who came through. It's crazy how some things are so memorable.
Thursday, December 16, 2010
Tom Glover said...
I HAD FORGOTTEN ALL ABOUT THAT GENTLEMAN WHO WAS AN AMPUTEE. HE ROLLED AROUND ON A FLAT BOARD AND PROPELLED HIMSELF WITH WOODEN BLOCKS IN EACH HAND.
Thursday, December 16, 2010
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Anonymous Anonymous said...
That's right! I forgot about the wooden blocks. I also loved going into VanSciver's Furniture Store on Broad St., they had all these neat rooms fully decorated as dining rooms, etc. I was very impressed at that age. Not to mention that the building was gorgeous and still is. It seemed like a castle to me. I remember that Public Service had a bus line also. So I could take either Trenton Transit or that one home. Remember the new sparkled pavements outside the renovated Sears store? I loved the Toy Chest (I think that's what it was) at Christmas time. There are so many memories...
Thursday, December 16, 2010

Tuesday, December 14, 2010

1934: HOLIDAY LIESURE - TRENTON, CHRISTMAS 1934

Sorry folks, but I am addicted to these ads which list some of the places my Mom and Dad and other of my relatives and friends attended back when the city of Trenton and environs were far different from today. A large beer for a dime, a turkey or steak dinner for a quarter, Ravioli and meat balls at Casa Nova for another quarter, and the beat went on! We were in the depth of the Great Depression and even with those incredibly low prices, many families could ill afford an evening out. Poverty was rampant.
Blogger JoeZ said...
Tom these are the greatest, can not believe the prices only if they would come but once a year now. I show these to the younger people I work with who can't believe these are real.
Tuesday, December 14, 2010
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Blogger Tom Glover said...
ME EITHER, JOE. A QUARTER WENT A LONG WAY. BUT I REMEMBER HOW MY MOM AND DAD HAD TO STRUGGLE TO MAKE THE 27.00 A MONTH PAYMENT ON OUR HOUSE. BY THE WAY, THEY PURCHASED THAT DUPLEX ON HARTLEY AVENUE WITH A HAND SHAKE. MRS. GRITZNER OF LAWRENCEVILLE WAS THE OWNER. SHE OFFERED THE OTHER SIDE OF THE DUPLEX FOR AN EXTRA 1,000 DOLLARS BUT MY DAD COULDN'T AFFORD THE EXTRA AMOUNT OF MONEY FOR THE MONTHLY PAYMENT. TOM GLOVER
Tuesday, December 14, 2010
Blogger Ralph Lucarella said...
HI TOM....I'D LIKE TO REMIND EVERYONE THAT MY FATHER WORKED ON THE JUNIOR 2 PROJECT IN THE 30'S FOR NOTHING BUT A FOOD ORDER AND I WAS ON THE NYA WORKING FOR $18 A MONTH. MY FATHER LOST THE HOUSE ON BERT AVE. AND BOUGHT A HOUSE ON FRANKLIN ST. FOR $1,800 WITH THE MONEY THE GOVERMENT PAID HIM ON THE FORECLOSURE. SO YOU SEE, THOSE PRICES ABOVE REFLECT THE CONDITIONS THAT EXISTED AT THE TIME AND WE MADE THE BEST OF IT. MERRY CHRISTMAS TO ALL.
Wednesday, December 15, 2010
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Blogger Mack said...

Hi Tom:) These listings are some of my favorite posts of yours:) I would never know these things about the former names of the local taverns/eateries without them. Marvelous!!:)
Wednesday, December 15, 2010
GLAD YOU LIKE THEM, MACK. I ALSO LOVE TO RE-FORMAT THE PAGE AND POST THEM. THERE WILL BE MORE AS THE SEASON CHANGES. STAY TUNED. AND RALPH, AN INTERESTING STORY ON JUNIOR 2 AND THE HOME FORECLOSURE. CAN YOU IMAGING BUYING A HOUSE FOR A LITTLE UNDER $2,000?
TOM

1934: CHRISTMAS TOYLAND IN TRENTON DEPARTMENT STORES

"Toy land, toy land, dear little girl and boy land,
While you are within it, you are ever happy there.
Childhood joy land, dear little girl and boy land,
Once you've passed its portals you may never return again.."

How often we sang that old Victor Herbert song back when I was a boy! Who among my visitors, male and female hasn't experienced the joy of a trip to downtown Trenton to visit Swern's, Goldberg's, Hurley Tobin's, or the numerous other department stores that proliferated in a bustling city? Some years ago, I wrote a column entitled, "No bee bee gun, and that's final." How I wanted that same Daisy air rifle that was coveted on Jean Shepard's "Christmas Story!" Yup, my mom even saw to it that I never got that childhood treasure with the same "you'll put your eye out" story.
Blogger JoeZ said...
Tom these photos are great, they sure changed to look of Santa now those little beards are funny.
Tuesday, December 14, 2010
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Blogger JoeZ said...
I got an air rifle one year for Christmas, no bb's just made a lot of noise and started the neigbbor's dog barking.
Tuesday, December 14, 2010

Blogger Tom Glover said...
NOT ME, JOE. I WANTED ONE BUT MY MOM WAS AGAINST THEM. INSTEAD I GOT A LOUSY CORK GUN THAT SHOT ALL OF 4 OR 5 FEET. I DID TAKE OUT A NUMBER OF THOSE OLD FASHIONED CHRISTMAS BALLS. TOM GLOVER
Tuesday, December 14, 2010
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Anonymous Anonymous said...
Tom - I have two pictures with Santa taken at Christmas time - one at Goldbergs's toyland and the other at Hurley-Tobins. One was taken in 1947, I was five, and the other was 1949, I was seven. They are a treasure to me! Actually these two Santas were very well done. My folks were especially careful about that, I think. Lakeside Girl
Wednesday, December 15, 2010

Monday, December 13, 2010

1886 - 1887 CHRISTMAS IN HAMILTON SQUARE

Long before the advent of the scanner and comprehensive image editing software, I manually transcribed many hundreds of local articles from my "CHRONOLOGY" collection of Trenton newspapers. The above is one of the many that will be appearing on this blog in future posts. The newspapers such as those cited above were devoid of accompanying graphics or engravings. Accordingly, I have manipulated my imaging software and inserted appropriate photos from the Hamilton Library Local History Collection; in this case the "HAMILTON SQUARE BAPTIST CHURCH" and "HAMILTON SQUARE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH" folders. I hope you agree that we have a timely and historically interesting entry on this blog.

1934: A GOLDBERG'S TRENTON MERRY CHRISTMAS

Goldberg's was MY favorite store with their very well-stocked "TOYLAND." In one of  the many Christmas columns I have written over the past 25-plus years, the one I recall most vividly was detailing a trip to "Downtown Trenton" during the Christmas season. As a boy of r or 6, I remember asking my mother why Santa's beard moved when he talked, but his lips stayed in place. Ahh, the innocence of childhood!
Blogger Ralph Lucarella said...
HI TOM.... GOLDBERG'S BARGIN BASEMENT WAS OUR FAVORITE PLACE. I DO'NT THINK WE BOUGHT ANYTHING UPSTAIRS UNTIL THE LATE 30'S. WE ALSO PATRONIZED GIMBEL'S NEXT DOOR AND WHEN WE WANTED SOMETHING SPECIAL WE WENT TO SWERN'S, WHICH WAS RIGHT DOWN THE STREET AND SOLD MOSTLY BETTER PRODUCTS. DOWNTOWN TRENTON IN THOSE DAYS WAS LIKE VISITING SOMETHING SPECIAL AND WE ALWAYS ENJOYED IT, REGARDS.
Tuesday, December 14, 2010

1898 CHIRSTMAS AT HAMILTON TOWNSHIP'S FARMINGDALE SCHOOL

From my very substantial "CHRONOLOGY" folder, this Farmingdale School item which was transcribed from the original copy to an "RT F" word processor file. The Christmas art work and the photo have been added to provide a necessary embellishment.

1934: MESZAROS MEAT MARKET

A familiar family name, and an even more familiar Trenton Business from the past. I remember Meszaros, and also Caeser's  meat market on the corner of South Clinton and Hamilton Avenues. My father in law Ray Britton  worked as an electrician at John A Roebling Co. back in the 20's and 30's, and often stopped at Caeser's on his long walk home to Hamilton and Newkirk Avenues in Hamilton Township.

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Anonymous omad said...
Hi Tom, Just back after a month and catching up with your columns. Always a priority for me. Have you anything on Palumbo's market in the Burg? My dad always got supplies for our restaurant on Hamilton Ave from there.
Monday, December 13, 2010
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Blogger Mack said...
Hi Tom:) My city directory shows this was still there (the 1079 address) in the late 1950s but became HGK Meats in the early 1960s:)
Monday, December 13, 2010
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Blogger Michael said...
Tom: It's ironic you mentioned Caeser's meat market. I am Active in my Church (St. Vincent dePaul) Less fortunate and homeless ministry here in Newport News. With the economy being what it is, donations have tapered off. We were short of Turkeys and Hams for the Christmas Baskets, and I decided to donate 20 in my mother's name, since she always fed the poor from our back door in South Trenton,back in the 30's. My son David directed me to a business just yesterday, and I asked him what type of business it was, he said "just like Caesers's on Hamilton and Clinton" We got what we needed, and will be dropping them off this afternoon. I guess you never forget your "Home Town". Regards Mike Kuzma
Monday, December 13, 2010
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Blogger Tom Glover said...
Great story, Mike. The Glovers were very familiar with being poor. As poor as we were, we always had a homeless men come around for a handout. Though we were monetarily poor, we had checkins, eggs and a bountiful basement full of Mom Glover's canned goods from our garden. There was never a man who knocked on our BACK door who went away hungry. They always wanted to do labor in return for the food. This was just as we were coming out of the great depression in the late 1930's. I learned a valuable lesson coming from a poor family. In later life, my bosses (who had promised me and my next in line buddy a very bright future) retired and turned the business over to their sons. The company went Chapter 11 within a year or so and I and my buddy were holding the bag; no pension, no severance pay and no hospitalization. It was a life-changing experience. TOM GLOVER
Monday, December 13, 2010