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Saturday, October 30, 2010

1940: MEMBERS OF THE JUNIOR 3 BOYS' AND GIRLS' SCHOOL SAFETY PATROL

How proud we were to wear those Keystone Automobile Club belts and badges, identifying us as the traffic assistants for our under-class men! I don't know if Junior 3 was sponsored by Keystone as we were in Hamilton Township, Perhaps an alumnus can enlighten us.

1940: EVENTS FOR THE SCHOOL YEAR 1940-41 AT JUNIOR 4

I am saving graphics from the growing Junior 4-Grace Dunn School for my friend, Gus Perilli. Gus is an active member of the Junior 4 Alumni Association which meets monthly  here in the Hamilton Township Public Library. I am really happy to hear that the Jr. 4 alumni folks are very active in their new found organization.

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Blogger Mack said...
Hi Tom:) Please tell the JR4 Alumni to get on the net. If they have important memories they are sharing amongst themselves they can spread these to an additional and appreciative audience.
Sunday, October 31, 2010
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Blogger Tom Glover said...
UNFORTUNATLY MIKE, MOST ALUMNI ARE FROM THE OLDER GENERATION, AND THOSE WHO ARE ON THE COMPUTER ARE FEW AND FAR BETWEEN. I AM TRYING TO GET GUS PERILLI TO LEARN THE BASICS. GUS IS ONE OF THE FOUNDERS OF THE NEW ASSOCIATION. I SPEAK BEFORE MANY SENIOR CITIZEN GROUPS ON VARIOUS SUBJECTS. IF THERE ARE 50 OR 100 PEOPLE IN ATTENDANCE, I ASK HOW MANY ARE ON THE COMPUTER. MAYBE 2 OR 3 HANDS. IT'S FRUSTRATING. MANY SAY IT'S "TOO COMPLICATED," MANY DON'T UNDERSTAND WHAT I AM SAYING, AND MANY ARE JUST TOO OCCUPIED WITH GROWING OLD. MY BLOG WOULD BE A TREASURE TO MOST OF THEM WITH THE MIX OF HISTORY, NOSTALGIA, AND PERSONAL PHOTOS FROM THE PAST. PERHAPS AS THE TECHNOLOGY MATURES, THERE WILL BE A "1-2-3" ABILITY TO ACCESS THE WEB. THANK GOD FOR OUR MANY VISITORS WHO TOOK THE INITIATIVE TO LEARN (RALPH LUCARELLA COMES TO MIND; JUST LOOK AT THE VALUABLE INSIGHT HE HAS ADDED TO MY POSTS.) TOM GLOVER
Sunday, October 31, 2010
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Blogger Michael said...
Hi Tom:
I'm confused. You refer to Gus as "one of the founders of this new organization". To the best of my aged memory, i was a member of the Jr.#4 Alumni Association perhaps 20 years ago. We met at Johnny Cipriano's wife's dance studio on 2nd St. near Cass. Cip, and the late Ray Kostrua of the Amoroso Florists kept the group going. The last function I attended before heading South was our class of 1949 reunion at the Roman Hall in 1999. I was joined by at least 300 of my closest classmates. Just this past month, my sister Hilda (class of 1946) attended her 20 or 25th straight annual reunion, coming up from her place in Florida. I know Gus, from his Tindall Ave days, I remember dating his sister in law Jeanie, but don't recall him starting "our group" 20 some odd years ago.
On Jr. 4 roll up the score, we'll rally round you to beat the foe! etc. etc.
Regards, and good wishes
Mike Kuzma
Sunday, October 31, 2010
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Blogger Tom Glover said...
 Monday, November 01, 2010
SORRY, MIKE. I UNDERSTOOD THAT THE ASSOCIATION WAS SOMEWHAT INACTIVE. WHAT I SHOULD HAVE SAID WAS THAT GUS WAS ONE OF THE MOVERS AND SHAKERS WHO RE-VITALIZED THE ASSOCIATION. 
GO SIT IN THE CORNER, TOM GLOVER, AND PUT ON THAT WHITE DUNCE CAP; YOU'RE GROUNDED! TOM

2010: PENNY CANDY AGAIN!

I drew this graphic with pen and ink 21 years ago, way back in 1989 for a column I did on one of my favorite subjects, which happens to be penny candy. The graphic following this came from the home page of  Old Time Candy, a company who is keeping the tradition alive. The link was sent to me by visitor  Joe Lind. As you can see, there is a definite interest in those simple and innocent times when a kid could plop down a nickel and nearly fill up that little tan paper bag with candy that actually cost a penny.....indeed, there were a number of penny candies that were two for a penny! Wow, am I getting old!

NOTE: ADDITIONAL PENNY CANDY POSTS can be found by searching in the upper left SEARCH BLOG area. Type in PENNY CANDY, click on the magnifying glass,  and look to the bottom right of the page and wait for the green progress light to finish. Then, page down. 

Michael said...
Tom:

I'm abashed you failed to draw the easist one of the all time favorite penny candies;

The paper strip with the candy button you bit off along with a piece of the paper. And don't forget the wax bottle of colored water. You bit off the top of what looked like a coke bottle, and drank down pure joy; Yuck!!!
Regards
JerseyMike Kuzma
Sunday, October 31, 2010

Don't be "abashed," Mike.  Anyone who remembers penny candy realizes that there are hundreds of other penny candies sold during that era. It took me some time to sketch those few samples. I never did illustrate "Licorice Passas," "Mary Janes," "Sugar Daddys,""Jaw Breakers and.....I could go on. By the way, those wax bottles were a delight. I usually doubled up with them, along with those pinwheels that only a true penny candy gourmet knew how to eat!

Tom Glover

1940: BARLOW'S MUSIC STORE- A LEGENDARY LANDMARK

When one thought of books, Traver's came to mind. Music? Barlow's, of course! It was the favorite destination of school teachers who could find or obtain obscure and rare sheet music. Barlow's had everything. As can be seen in the article above, the "automatic" phonograph was featured. A true marvel of the age! Later on, Zorn's and other downtown Trenton music shops opened, but most specialized in phonograph records.
Blogger Ralph Lucarella said...
BARLOW'S MUSIC STORE BRINGS BACK THE MEMORY OF HOW WE TRADED IN AN ACCORDION FOR A SAXOPHONE WHEN WE WERE KIDS BACK IN THE 30'S. OUR FRIEND ARTHUR DeBRONZO TOOK THE SAX HOME AND NOT ONE OF US WERE ABLE TO MAKE A SOUND OUT OF IT. BARLOW'S SUGGESTED LESSONS BUT WE WERE SURE OF LEARNING HOW TO PLAY IT OURSELVES. A SILLY TIME BY A BUNCH OF SILLY KIDS.
Saturday, October 30, 2010

1940: TRENTON'S NEW LINCOLN AND DONNELLY HOMES

Here's a news photo from the Daily State Gazette showing happy tennants assisting a neighbor in moving to the new luxurious apartments that have since been torn down. In recent years, the homes were deteriorating and plagued with drugs and other community issues.

2010: TOMATO PIES: ONE MORE TIME!

 A RICKY DE LORENZO TOMATO PIE

Ask any Trentonian, Hamiltonian, or any other Mercer County area person to name his or her favorite tomato pie and you will get an answer that depends on not only the taste and quality, but also the logistics of partaking in this delightful Italian food. Judy tells me I should have been born Italian with my craving for the Italian cuisine. My daughter Julie lives in Tabernacle and there is a place in that area called Roselli's that hand craft frozen lasagna, tortolini bolognaise, and ravioli that is beyond delicious. These dinners come out of the Glover oven as fresh as if one were being served in a restaurant.. Another South Jersey lunch that is unknown here in the Trenton area is a panzarotti; (SPELLING?) a delightful deep fried delicacy filled with cheese and tomato that makes a perfect lunch. Over the years I have visited my daughter, I have tried to find a local Tabernacle/Medford south Jersey tomato pie that can compare with the Trenton Tomato pie. The result is always a pizza, never called a tomato pie with thick crust, minimal tomato buried under a layer of thick cheese. Tasty, but not what I enjoy in what I consider a true tomato pie.
(IT IS IMPORTANT TO NOTE THAT THE ABOVE OBSERVATIONS ARE  MY PERSONAL OPINIONS AND OBSERVATIONS. I HAVE NO DOUBT THAT DELORENZO'S HUDSON STREET, AND PAPA'S (THE OLDEST) AND OTHER NEIGHBORHOOD PIZZARIAS SERVE A GENUINE QUALITY TOMATO PIE. I AM A "TO GO" OR "PICKUP"  CUSTOMER AND WANT MY PIE TO BE NICE AND HOT WHEN I GET IT HOME; RICKY DELORENZO'S IS ONLY A FEW BLOCKS FROM MY ATLANTIC AVENUE HOME.)
Tom, no need to explain yourself, pal. DeLo's on Hamilton BURIES the rest. ;) Jerry Foley
Monday, November 01, 2010

Thursday, October 28, 2010

1940: POPULAR LOCAL EATERIES AND OTHER DESTINATIONS

1940: LONDON WAS BEING BOMBED ON A DAILY BASIS. OVER HERE, AMERICA WAS GETTING READY FOR THE INEVITABLE WAR AS THE STORMY WAR CLOUDS GATHERED. IN OUR LOCAL AREA, MOMS AND DADS WERE BECOMING APPREHENSIVE AS THE PROSPECTS OF THEIR SONS GOING TO THAT INEVITABLE WAR LOOMED EVER CLOSER. HOWEVER, LEISURE ACTIVITIES HAVE ALWAYS BEEN A SAFE HAVEN FOR THOSE WHO WANT TO DINE AND DANCE AND ENJOY A FEW HOURS AWAY FROM THE EVERYDAY CONFLICTS OF THE WORLD. THE ADVERTISERS IN THE ABOVE GRAPHIC PROVIDED THAT ESCAPE. EVEN BACK THEN THERE WAS A PROLIFERATION OF NIGHTSPOTS AND RESTAURANTS IN CHAMBERSBURG. CHECK 'EM OUT.
Blogger Mack said...
Hi Tom:) I love when you do these as I often discover new names of places. This is the first time I ever saw 559 Emory (Emory Cafe in my day) called "Persi's Tap Room" for example:)
Thursday, October 28, 2010
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Blogger Ralph Lucarella said...
HI TOM....I NEVER REALIZED WE HAD THAT MANY PLACES TO SPEND A NIGHT OUT IN THOSE DAYS. AND DID YOU NOTICE THOSE PRICES FOR FOOD AND ENTERTAINMENT. HOW COULD ANYONE QUESTION THE FACT THAT WE WERE NOT MUCH BETTER OFF THEN. BEST REGARDS
Thursday, October 28, 2010

Wednesday, October 27, 2010

1941: THE COMMON, ORDINARY, FUNCTIONAL, ECONOMICAL "PLYMOUTH"

At one time, I had one of the most comprehensive collections of old automobile catalogs and folders. Times change, and so does the storage space in my home, and the collection was disposed of long ago to an old buddy of mine, Nat Adelstein. Nat was a dealer in old auto parts and advertising. In fact, I sold my 1940 Buick "Special" to him back in 1979 and it was destined for shipment to Sweden. Here's another of those great old ads which heralded the features of the three economical American marques back in the pre war years. The reliable and very low cost Plymouth.

1949: 55,000 ATTEND THE N.J. STATE FAIR

The heyday of the Interstate Fair ended in the 1960's when the powers that be decided to close up shop and move to south Jersey. We who remember that wonderful annual affair still recall the excitement that the weekly visit gave to local citizens, and indeed, citizens from all neighboring states. Daring air shows, Lucky Teter, Joey Chitwood, Lucky Lucy, auto races, fireworks, amusement rides, all went on to another location. The photo was published over the headline, "FAIR CROWD HITS 55,000."
Blogger Ralph Lucarella said...
HI TOM... THE STATE FAIR WAS SOMETHING I ALWAYS LOOKED FORWARD TO. I THINK THE WHOLE IDEA OF THE FAIR CHANGED WHEN GEORGE HAMID TOOK OVER CONTROL. THE FAIR WAS HELD TO ACKNOWLEDGE THE EFFORTS OF MANY PEOPLE WHILE HAMID TURNED IT INTO A MONEY MAKING AFFAIR. THE BIG DAY WAS WHEN WE GOT THE DAY OFF FROM SCHOOL TO ATTEND. I NEVER SAW SO MANY KIDS LOST IN THE CROWDS WHILE THEIR PARENTS WERE WORRIED SICK. MOST PEOPLE WENT TO EAT ALL THAT FOOD WHICH WAS AVAILABLE ON THE MIDWAY AND I ALWAYS HAD STOMACH THE NEXT DAY. THE FAIR AND THE MANY CARNIVALS WE HAD IN THOSE DAYS ARE MEMORIES I'LL ALWAYS ENJOY. BEST REGARDS.
Wednesday, October 27, 2010
Blogger Michael said...
We Kuzma kids were fortunate to have an Uncle who had a Model A Coupe with a Rumble seat. He would pack us all(5) into the coupe,and drop us off in the Dirt entrance beside the Bromley Inn. I can still see Pete Barruda (sp)at work doing his paintings of clowns on Homasote boards. Several hours later, at an appointed time, 5 very tired Kuzma kids piled back into the Model A for our ride back to South Trenton. The excitement still reverberates thoughout my body, and I visualize the Midway with the Carnys hawking thier wares, and the mysteries of the Carnie. Fond memories, and best regards Mike Kuzma
Thursday, October 28, 2010
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Blogger Tom Glover said...
HEY MIKE.....WHAT ABOUT SEAT BELTS? HOW WELL I REMEMBER THE THRILL OF RIDING IN A RUMBLE SEAT! TOM GLOVER
Friday, October 29, 2010
Anonymous  
omad said...
Lucky Teter is the name that reminds me most of the fairs. A year ago was riding with my teen age grandson and I said "you drive like Lucky Teter" and he, of course, said "what the heck is that". When I explained he laughed for the next half mile. Don't think my shoes ever got clean from walking the midway after a rain.
Friday, October 29, 2010

1940: "SOUNDIES:" ANOTHER NOSTALGIC VISION FROM THE PAST

Lord, am I getting old! I remember those hi-tech "soundies" that Hollywood churned out back in the late 1930's and into the war years. Back before DVD's, MP3's, WMV's and other digital entertainment, old fogies such as I had to rely on 8 or 16 millimeter film. I had a huge collection of 16 millimeter movies back in the 1970's but they took up half a wall in my basement so I got rid of them. Within that collection there was a number of old fashioned, "Soundies;" including Duke Ellington, Fats Waller, and one that I particularly liked, Helen O'Connell.

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Blogger Ralph Lucarella said...
WELL TOM, THERE AGAIN WE SHARED THE SAME THING. MY WIFE BOUGHT ME A BELL AND HOWELL MOVIE PROJECTOR IN 1940 AND I WAS SHOOTING EVERYTHING IN SIGHT. IN LATTER YEARS WE TURNED THEM INTO TAPES AND TODAY WE LOOK AT THE GOOD OLD DAYS ON EDINBURG ROAD AND THE TERRIFIC SNOW STORMS WE HAD IN THOSE DAYS. REGARDS.
Wednesday, October 27, 2010

1941: THE COMMON, ORDINARY, FUNCTIONAL, ECONOMICAL "CHEVY"

We "Old Timers" remember when we could recognize and name every auto that drove passed, or was parked along the curb, or in a parking lot. For me personally, I have lost the ability to recognize the autos of today. They all  look alike, and there are so many of them! Gone are the days when Plymouth, Dodge, De Soto, Chrysler, Chevrolet, Pontiac, Buick, Cadillac, Ford, Lincoln, and Mercury dominated the scene, not to mention the "underdogs" of the era, Hudson, Nash and Studebaker. That '41 Chevy above, along with the equally economical '41 Ford, and Plymouth, were the "common working man's car." Some of our more affluent citizens moved a step up the ladder to the next and more expensive models. they were years of glory in the U.S. auto industry and I will never forget them, nor will my contemporaries!
INCIDENTALLY, THAT BEAUTIFUL CHEVY ILLUSTRATED ABOVE WAS AVAILABLE AT
GILBERT & MOTT CHEVROLET ON PRINCETON AVENUE IN TRENTON, AND
AT SOUTH BROAD CHEVROLET WHICH WOULD MORPH INTO HAMILTON TOWNSHIP'S RENOWNED BONDERCHUK CHEVROLET.
Anonymous rayfromvillapark said...
Hi Tom, My parents purchased the first Ruby Maroon 1941 Chevrolet Special DeLuxe that arrived at Bonderchuk Chevrolet's new car emporium. I grew up with that car. We kept it until 1953, when it was traded in for a 1953 Pontiac Eight Special Sedan. Here are two photos (sent by direct email to you). It is OK, if you want to use them. I loved both of those cars. The Ruby Maroon did not hold up (it turned Chalky) and we had the car repainted Black, by Kisthardt Auto Body on Chambers St., before WWII ended. The Black held up fine. I later restored a 1941 Chevrolet Special DeLuxe Club Coupe during the 1970s. These were real standout cars, that are very popular with collectors today.
Wednesday, October 27, 2010
I REMEMBER YOUR CHEVY, RAY. IT WAS A BEAUTIFUL CAR. 
TOM GLOVER

1976: STEINERT "SPARTANETTES" CAPTURE FIRST PLACE IN ATLANTIC CITY

The lovely Steinert High School "Spartanettes" made Hamilton Township proud back in 1976 when they took first place at the National Music Festival in Atlantic City.

1976: NAME THE NAMES OF VIOLENT JUVENILES

AMEN!

1976: HAMILTON'S FINEST RECEIVE VARIOUS AWARDS

That's my old  friend for all these years Al Varga in the photo above along with his "men in blue" colleagues as they received well-deserved awards for law enforcement excellence.

1976: HAMILTON'S BICENTENNIAL PARADE

Another local custom became a victim what that old,  tiresome malady known as "White Flight." Before my Atlantic Avenue neighborhood became the victim of that dreaded malady, the various parades held in Hamilton Township were centered around the Municipal Building at 2090 Greenwood Avenue, and the Mercerville - Hamilton Square area. But one of the other venues was to change. One by one, families living too close to the city of Trenton joined the white flight community, moving to the east and south where the malady hadn't yet evolved. As a result, the parade that once followed the route described above was moved to the more affluent Hamilton Square area where the Nottingham Volunteer Fire Company has been parading for years. The trend continues. Plans are underway to move  Trenton's annual St. Patrick's Day parade off the streets of Trenton to the more affluent suburbs; in my opinion another case of white flight trumping tradition.

Tuesday, October 26, 2010

1976: CHANNELIZATION OF POND RUN DURING JACK RAFFERTY'S TENURE AS MAYOR OF HAMILTON

This project was very welcome to those folks who live along Pond Run in the Kuser and Bromley areas of Hamilton Township. I recall back in the 1970's going to our friends the Ken Warner family on Leukel Avenue during the devastating flood that engulfed the area back in the early 70's. Flood damage was in the millions. The water level in the Warner home was up to the top step in the basement doorway in the kitchen. The concrete spillway that was referred to above very effectively solved the Hamilton Pond Run flooding problem and is a feather in the cap of the Rafferty administration for the project.

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Anonymous Harry said...
The cheaper and environmentally-healthier solution is to not build houses, offices, stores and so forth in areas that would be better left to their natural state. Over-development or poorly-planned development costs taxpayers millions. Look at South Trenton. Houses probably shouldn't ever have been put there. Now, those poor folks are also having to deal with frequent flooding because too much concrete in North Jersey doesn't allow rainwater to properly soak into the ground.
Wednesday, October 27, 2010
VERY TRUE, HARRY. SOME PEOPLE JUST LIKE TO LIVE AS CLOSE TO WATER AS POSSIBLE....WHETHER THE OCEAN, A LAKE, A POND, OR A STREAM. MOTHER NATURE IS IRRELEVANT UNTIL TRAGEDY STRIKES. 
TOM GLOVER

1976: WHEN AN 8TH GRADE GRADAUTE HAD TO KNOW HIS OR HER STUFF!

I would have flunked that exam, Maury! Well, perhaps if I had spent my entire 8th grade year and had access to all the contemporary text books and class note at that Kansas school, I would have passed. In retrospect, it gives a general idea of how education in years gone by was much more directed at learning the very basics of our culture. I don't need to remind myself that an 8th grade education in 1907 Kansas is farm removed from an education in the New Jersey (and America) of 2011.

1976: ITALIAN COUNCIL GENERAL GREETED BY LOCAL DIGNITARIES

Many of the Mercer County area's prominent Italian-Americans turned out to welcome Dr. Bozzi on his visit to the Trenton area during our Bicentennial year.

1974: WHITE HORSE VOLUNTEER FIRE COMPANY LADIES' AUXILIARY

What would our volunteers do without the assistance of the ladies all over America who serve their local fire companies? Beside their ongoing fund raisers, the ladies are there to assist in any facets of the fire company that is within their area of expertise.

Monday, October 25, 2010

1974: CASUAL "SNEAKERS;" WHEN COMMON SENSE WAS KING

To me, one of the greatest ripoffs of the century are the prices charged for those casual shoes made by Nike, Addidas, and other sport shoe manufacturers. But consider the source: An aging dinosaur who remembers when one could go in to a store and buy a pair of canvas "PF" (Posture Foundation) "sneakers" for less than 5 bucks. Look at those prices now! Like Pavlov's dogs, we have been conditioned to accept those over-priced descendants of the old fashioned canvas "sneaker."
Blogger Ralph Lucarella said...
IN THE EARLY YEARS TOM, WE DIDI'NT HAVE PEOPLE GETTING MILLIONS OF DOLLERS FOR INDORSEMENTS LIKE THESE GUYS GET TODAY. WE KIDS WORE SNEAKS ALL SUMMER THAT COST ONLY A FEW BUCKS. I FEEL SORRY FOR THE PARENTS TODAY THAT FALL FOR ALL THAT BALONEY THAT NIKE AND THE REST OF THOSE BIG SHOTS TRY TO SELL. THANK GOD FOR WAL-MART.
Monday, October 25, 2010
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Blogger Mack said...
I remember Shoe Time on Rt 33 had very good prices for sneakers back in the day:)
Monday, October 25, 2010
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Blogger JoeZ said...
Tom: I remember getting a new pair of black and white Keds when summer started and they lasted all summer long, also purchased at a great price.
Monday, October 25, 2010

1974: CARL MOLDOVAN-HAMILTON SCHOOL OUTSPOKEN FISCAL WATCHDOG

You either agreed or disagreed with the views of Mr. Moldovan, but even the most staunch teachers' union advocates had to reluctantly agree that he did have some valid complaints about budgetary excesses in the township's annual tax increases. In my personal case, my entire monthly social security check goes to Hamilton Township for my quarterly payment. A too large cut of that pie goes to our schools; indeed, more to the school system than to the township. It has been that way during all my years of being a Hamilton tax payer and will continue indefinitely. Most of us in the senior citizen community have been paying those exorbitant taxes long after our children graduated from grammar and high school.