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Tuesday, August 31, 2010

1938: SIX CONFIRMED AT TRENTON'S ADATH ISRALE SYNAGOGUE

These lovely ladies pose proudly for the Sunday Times photographer for their landmark confirmation in the local Jewish community. The Siegel, Swern, Millner and Lavine are among the prominent surnames I recall.

1934: LABOR DAY IN THE HEART OF THE GREAT DEPRESSION

I would have been 1 year old in September of this year of 1934. We lived at 100 Beal Street on the corner of Sylvan and Beal, and later moved to 144. Of course, I don't recall living in the Beal Street neighborhood, but brothers Bud and Len certainly do. Brother Len tells of the many times he pulled a wagon from Beal Street to Liberty to South Olden, all the way to the Giant Tiger store on North Clinton Avenue to pick up our "commodities;" a not too sophisticated name they gave to "relief" (today's welfare) recipients. Note that each item on sale in the ad above included "Easy Terms." Back then, the desperate merchants would pay 25, 50, or maybe a dollar a week to pay for the merchandise.

1934: RECORDING ON PAPER; WHAT WILL THEY THINK OF NEXT?

I have been involved in media matters for many, many years. Way back in the mid 1940's, I recall  when our Hamilton High choir journeyed over to WTNJ on Bellevue Avenue and recorded "You'll Never Walk Alone" on a plastic phonograph disk. Then, in the late 1950's I bought a wire recorder from a Lambertville flea market dealer, along with little spools of 35 millimeter film which were all a part of a Nash automobile sales campaign. Then with the advent of the successors to the paper tape recorder above, I began a quest to find a tape recorder for my extensive collection of old radio programs like "The Lone Ranger," "Your Hit Parade," "The Paul Whiteman Show," and hundreds of other then- "hi-tech" electronic appliances. So here we are in the 21st century. I have numerous MP3 players with hundreds of hours of radio programs which are absolutely free for downloading. My old time radio collection sits in my basement, stack upon stack of now out-dated reel to reel tapes. MP 3 players can also record those old 33-1/3, 78, and 45 RPM records and convert them to MP3 "on the run." Time Marches On!

1934: "YOU'VE COME A LONG WAY, BABY!"

I think the slogan above was a Virginia Slims cigarette ad from a number of years ago, catering to the female smoker. It's interesting to note the comments of "One Who Remembers" as he pontificates on the morals of some women in 1934 America. Hey, One Who Remembers, you oughta see us now! I've heard "liberated" young girls on television using language that we guys rarely heard in our barracks!

1910 (Ca 1910) FORMAN'S CIGAR STORE

This graphic is from one of John Cleary's "Trenton in Bygone Days" columns from 1934. How I love these old photos of Trenton from an earlier era! Not the cigar store Indian in the photo; a delightful Indian maiden!

Monday, August 30, 2010

1934: REMEMBERING THE YARDVILLE NATIONAL BANK

It's was a familiar sight to see as we wended our way down South Broad Street in Yardville and passed the old Yardville National Bank. The building is still  there, but it now sports the name of one of the larger banks which have taken over the fast evaporating independent community bank. It is interesting to note that the old familiar building was moved to that site. Does any visitor know where it was moved from?
Anonymous Anonymous said...
I believe it was moved from around the corner and was a boys' school or academy at one time. Anonymous

1942: SACRED HEART GRAMMAR SCHOOL COMMENCEMENT PROGRAM

Here is a beautiful digital duplication of the commencement exercises for the class of 1942 from the late, great Sacred Heart Grammar School. The school shut down only recently due to the lack of attendance which in turn was the result of the lack of funds to support the meager number of students.

Saturday, August 28, 2010

1934: EWING BOYS GO TO CAMP

There are many old Ewing family names in the above photo. I see Wes Armstrong who operated Armstrong Industrial Supply" when I worked in Ewing back in the early 1950's.

Friday, August 27, 2010

1934: SO. CLINTON AVENUE LOOKING TOWARD E. STATE ST.

That spire was long gone before I was a visitor to Trenton. Undoubtedly struck by lightning in some severe thunder storm in the distant past. Many church steeples didn't survive the years. The steeple on First Baptist Church on Centre Street in Trenton, the Hamilton Square Presbyterian Church steeple in Hamilton Square all were the victim of Mother Nature's wrath.

1934: RENOVATING "WOODLAWN;" THE WILLIAM TRENT HOUSE

Like all humans, aging takes a toll. As can be seen in the photo above, this is what today's William Trenton House looked like before it was restored to perfection. The stately old home has a magnificent history dating to 1719; well before the Revolutionary War. Note that the article gives the old structure a South Warren Street address. In the intervening years, South Warren Street is no more, having been terminated near West Front Street when Trenton began renovating the Cooper, Union, Lamberton Street area. The stately historic building is open daily from 12:30 P,M. to 4 P.M. Information can be obtained by calling 609-989-3027.

2010: DON'T MISS SONG STYLIST BOB ORLOWSKI THIS SUNDAY!

My Sunday Kuser Park Gazebo programs have ended, and this Sunday from 6 to 7:30 PM Bob Orlowski will keep the spirit of great music alive as he sings the songs of Frank Sinatra, Dean Martin, Nat "King" Cole, and all those vocalists we will never forget. It promises to be another evening of great music and bittersweet nostalgia. Hope to see many of my local visitors there!
Blogger JoeZ said...
Hi Tom: Bob is my second cousin, my grandmother and his grandmother lived next door to each other on Home Ave. My grandmother's last name was Orlowski. His dad was Henry and a Trenton Police officer, his brother' band played at my wedding back in 78. Nice to see his picture now and wishing him the best.

Thursday, August 26, 2010

1934: THE FLORENCE CRITTENDON MISSION EDGEWOOD AVENUE

It seems that the farther one gets from the city, the better chance that an old historic building will survive the wrecker's ball. This old 1934 photo of the mansion on Edgewood is still alive and well as can be seen in the graphic as seen in the birds' eye view.

1934: BRITAIN FEELS THE WINDS OF WAR

With the death of Hindenberg, Adolph Hitler took over as German Chancellor and within only a few months, the winds of war began to stir. Quietly at first, and then along came the "brown shirts" and their anti-Jew, anti-Catholic mentality. Hitler and his henchmen were striving for a "Super Race." Great Britain saw the coming conflict at least 5 years before the Fall of 1939, as can be seen in the above article.

1934: GERMAN YOUTH AT NAZI CAMP IN GRIGGSTOWN

It would be interesting to know how many of those young boys in the photos stayed with their "fatherland" as the 1930's unfolded, and the Nazis began their anti-semitic terrorist outrages in Germany.
Blogger Mack said...

Big Goverment tends to end badly..
Nazis , Commies...all worshippers
of the state.

Thursday, August 26, 2010

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Blogger JoeZ said...

Mack and Tom: I see this hatred in the US today towards some of it's citizens, it can happen again but I hope not. Hatred has to be wiped off the face of the earth.

Friday, August 27, 2010

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Blogger Tom Glover said...

AMEN, MACK AND JOE.

TOM

1934: REMEBERING THOSE WONDERFUL SUNDAY "FUNNIES"

This is a HUGE file. Using my Canon camera's "Macro" setting, I thought many visitors would like to sample a page from the golden age of American comics.
(we called them "funnies.") They were once a weekly feature in the Trenton Sunday Times Advertiser. How I remember "Prince Valiant," "Nancy," "The Katzenjammer Kids," "Captain Easy," and other long gone classics from the first half of the 20th century. I remember laying under our old radio in the Glover dining room, tuning in to WOR and listening to Uncle Don" as he read those comics from the Sunday New York Daily News." I followed along avidly, enthralled by the fact that Uncle Don was reading the very same comics as I followed along with him. My sister Dorothy was a "Dixie Dugan," "Etta Kett," and "Tillie the Toiler fan. She was also a collector of that weekly paper doll feature, carefully cutting out the dress and Tillie, at the same time wishing that mom and dad had the money to buy a bathing suit or dress like Tillie was wearing. But there was that depression thing, and the Glover family was poor even before the financial tragedy hit. Ahh, the memories!
Blogger JoeZ said...
Tom: Love those full page comics of the past. You don't see that anymore. Down here there on the back page along with a crossword puzzle. I remember Nancy, Prince Valiant, the Katz Kids, Blondie, Dick Tracy and others. Thanks for picture.

Wednesday, August 25, 2010

1934: NO NONSENSE JUDGES

Today, we read of lawbreakers being apprehended by our policemen and in the news articles we usually see that the perpetrator has a "rap sheet" going back sometime as long as 10 years. They get caught and somehow are released and get caught again, making many of us citizens who are ignorant of today's liberal laws ask, "why is he still on the street?" Back in the day, those n'er do wells who decided to break the law were dealt with in a manner that really discouraged their return to a life of crime. I especially like the punishment no-nonsense Judge Willard Grimm handed out to the juveniles who vandalized Homedell School. In today's society, those poor boys would be the victims of "cruel and unusual punishment."

1934: SUNDAY "BLUE LAWS" ALIVE AND WELL

I find the above article astounding as I compare it the present state of our society as the moral fabric of our society has changed so dramatically over the years. Today's weekend relaxation efforts are in stark contrast to those years when the "Blue Laws" were in effect in Trenton and across the country. Those laws allowed no liquor, no dancing or public singing or other leisurely public events on Sunday. Rather than tailgating parties at football games, a Sunday movie, or any other innocent pleasurable event, in those years it was against the law; the Sabbath was deemed a day of rest devoid of any secular entertainment.
Blogger
Mack said...
Hi Tom:)
When I was a kid in the early 70s there were still some blue laws as I remember Two Guys in Bordentown was one of the few places nearby that was open because Burington County did not have blue laws:)

Tuesday, August 24, 2010

1934: HOPEWELL'S MOUNTAIN CHRISTIAN CHURCH


What a fascinating story! This little church, tucked away in the fabled Sourland Mountain area of Hopewell and not too far from the old Lindbergh homestead, has a fabulous historic heritage. To those of us who treasure stories of old time country life, it takes only a bit of imagination to envision a family making a trek through the woodlands on Sabbath to give praise to God. Perhaps a visitor can bring me up to speed on the current status of this church. There is a 1950 article detailing the 160th anniversary of that little-known Hopewell church,

Monday, August 23, 2010

1928 AND 1940: FRITZ KUSER: MR. TRENTON TENNIS

Originally posted Monday, November 12, 2007


ONCE AGAIN FROM MY "NOTABLE PERSONS" FOLDER, FRED KUSER, A LOCAL TENNIS LEGEND BACK IN THE 30'S AND 40'S. FRITZ WAS A CHAMPION TENNIS PLAYER WHO PLAYED AGAINST MANY NATIONAL TENNIS STARS, INCLUDING DON BUDGE, BOBBY RIGGS, AND EVEN NEW JERSEY GOVERNOR MEYNER.

1927: Trenton Tennis Notables

Originally posted on Tuesday, November 18, 2008


There's "Mr. Trenton Tennis," Fritz Kuser up there in the photo lineup, along with other locally famous tennis players from the 20's and 30's. Eddie Craig was a regular Kuser opponent and Lou Stewart spent many hours on the Kuser tennis court. Indeed, in the 1940's Lou resided at the Kuser Farm home in Hamilton.

1946: Eddie Moylan - Trenton Tennis Star

Originally posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2008


This young man was a regular visitor to the Kuser Farm Tennis Club when Don Slabicki and I worked for Fritz and Edna Kuser in the 1940's. Eddie was the epitome of a role model. His quiet self confident manner impressed all who knew him. He was one of the few opponents who kept "Mr. Trenton Tennis," Fritz Kuser on the defensive. The last I heard of Eddie, he was the tennis coach (or is it tennis pro?) at Cornell University.

1946: TRENTON TENNIS GREAT EDDIE MOYLAN

Originally posted on Tuesday, December 09, 2008


Here's an interesting mini biography of Eddie and alumnus from Trenton Catholic High School which had an incredible history of turning out sports champions in every sport. I recently heard from a nephew of Eddie, and I hope he returns to this site for future posts relating to his uncle. Eddie probably won't remember "Tommy" Glover and Don Slabicki, who were members of the Kuser Farm Tennis Club back in the late 40's and the 50's. Eddie was "Mr. Nice Guy;" a gentleman through and through.
Blogger Ralph Lucarella said...
HI TOM.... I REMEMBER EDDIE WELL AND ALSO HIS BROTHER PAT. EDDIE WAS GREAT AT TENNIS AND I RECALL COMPETING WITH PAT AT BASEBALL. I ALWAYS WAS INTERESTED IN TENNIS BUT COULD NEVER AFFORD A RAQCKET DURING THOSE DAYS. PAUL NAPOLITANO FROM CHAMBERSBURG WAS ALSO ONE OF THE BETTER PLAYERS THAT MADE GOOD USE OF THE COURTS AT COLUMBUS PARK IN THE 1940S. BEST REGARDS.

HI TOM.... I REMEMBER EDDIE WELL AND ALSO HIS BROTHER PAT. EDDIE WAS GREAT AT TENNIS AND I RECALL COMPETING WITH PAT AT BASEBALL. I ALWAYS WAS INTERESTED IN TENNIS BUT COULD NEVER AFFORD A RAQCKET DURING THOSE DAYS. PAUL NAPOLITANO FROM CHAMBERSBURG WAS ALSO ONE OF THE BETTER PLAYERS THAT MADE GOOD USE OF THE COURTS AT COLUMBUS PARK IN THE 1940S. BEST REGARDS.
Monday, August 23, 2010
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Anonymous Sally Logan Gilman said...
Hi Tom: Paul Napolitano also played tennis at Cadwalader Park Courts off Parkside Avenue.The clay courts were rolled and lined and enjoyed by many of us, including Ed Torres, Russ Backus, Dave Hewitt and Albert Stark. We spent many summer evenings playing in the league. It was great fun

1934: WHITE HORSE GIRLS RAISE MONEY FOR THE TRENTON TIMES ICE FUND


These lovely girls worked quite hard in their collective effort to raise money for the annual Trenton Evening Times Ice Fund. As can be seen in the caption, they were successful!

1934: LOCAL TENNIS NOTABLES

There's little Billy Dwyer in the above photo. Bill Dwyer will be remembered not only as a wonderful Trenton history writer and author, but also for his tennis playing abilities. Charlie and Harlan Whitehead (the top photo) were regular visitors to the Kuser Farm clay tennis court.
Anonymous Sally Logan Gilman said...
Hi Tom: It's always wonderful to see Bill Dwyer's name and pix. He was a great player and he and his wife, Marge (Wright)Dwyer, a close friend of mine since 6th grade at Junior 3, both played tennis regularly. We all miss Bill who was a great friend, writer and newspaperman. Thanks, as always, for the priceless memories.

Saturday, August 21, 2010

1887: THE LIPPINCOTT-STOUT WEDDING

Here's one for you Gary Lippincott. Once again, this, and any other Groveville-related graphics you find on this blog are at your disposal. A right click on your mouse, respond to the "save image as" command and save it to a location on your computer hard drive. These graphics will make a very nice addition to your web blog. You have some really nice Groveville history on your site.

1885: FIRE AT THE CLARENCE COTTON MILL

Long before we had the sophisticated fire fighting we have today, the rural areas' worse fear was for a destructive fire. The pages are full of fires that decimated many establishments that were to remote to bring firefighters to the scene. In many instances before Hamilton Township began to build fire companies, calls were made to the city of Trenton, or as in the case of Groveville, a call went out to Bordentown for assistance.

1986: STEINERT "STRAIGHT A" STUDENTS

Back in my years at Hamilton High,"Straight A" students were known as "Top Drawer Academics." In all my years in grammar and high school, I achieved honor roll status a number of times, but never reached the status of straight A's.

1986: FROM THE "POLITICS-HAMILTON" FOLDER

Here's a photo of a younger Dave Kenny, Hamilton Councilman as he ventured into the world of local politics back in the 1980's. Also noted is the appointment of Sam Plumeri to the Chairmanship of the Hamilton Democratic Party.

1987: NOTTINGHAM NORTH STAR MARCHING UNIT

They're in their early 40's now, but these North Stars were a popular marching unit among the area high schools back in 1987. First place for their percussion unit, and general excellence.

2010: JOE DELORENZO, I MISS YOU

Joe and I became fast friends in the early 90's when he made one of his weekly or bi-weekly trips to the library to pick up books for Mrs. DeLorenzo. After I left the Circulation desk at the library and established my Local History workshop in the lower level, Joe would always stop in to say hello each and every time he came to check out books for his wife. He and I would just sit for a few minutes and remember old times. Joe loved to hear my stories about my love of a DeLorenzo tomato pie, as I recalled going to that vintage restaurant way back in the 40's when I became a teenager. I told Joe that it was one of the first places I went on my first date. I also told him how we sat in one of the booths waiting for our pie, and looked around the room in amazement as we saw actual photographs of Frank Sinatra, Dean Martin, Perry Como, and many other national celebrities who made sure to stop at DeLorenzo's when they were in town to eat a UNIQUE DeLorenzo tomato pie. I told him how my dear wife Judy went there as a teen ager with her girlfriens, always sharing a pie, and how they wrappe up the crust in a napkin to eat on the way home. My memory is a bit dim, but I do recall that "Pat" was one of the DeLorenzo's at the Hamilton Avenue location way back then. The other gentleman's name eludes me. I also recall how recently retired "Ricky D" would answer the phone when Judy called to order one of our near weekly tomato pies. He would do the Cary Grant thing: "Ju-dy, Ju-dy, Ju-dy." About a year or so ago, I came across a clipping while I was digitizing local history for the Library's Local History Collection. It was a photo of a young Joe DeLorenzo during his time serving in the military during World War II. Joe was truly a card-carrying member of "The Greatest Generation." When I gave him the digitized copy of that photo, you would have thought that I presented him with a ten karat diamond. He was truly touched and once again we started talking about "the good old days." Joe, I know you're up there and you hear me. I hope to be up there to see you again, and we can sit down and enjoy a DeLorenzo tomato pie; they are certain to be on the Heavenly menu.
Mack said...
I loved reading every word of this post Tom:))

Anonymous said...
Tom. The memories just keep rolling in with this one. I spent many wonderful days of my youth in Delorenzo's and still swear to this day there is nothing better in the world than a Trenton Tomato Pie. I do not live in the area anymore but within the last year I had a contractor here working on my house. He was from Trenton and just talking to him was a feast in itself. Much to my delight he brought me a DeLorenzo's tomato pie one of the days he was here and I thought I was in heaven. Thanks for an article that recalls such great memories. Judy Bingley Staed

Tom, I worked with Joe for 15 years growing up (full time and part time). He was a great man as are all of the DeLorenzo's. Working for Rick DeLorenzo was about as close to the military as you could get without actually being in the military. DeLorenzo's on Hamilton is the best pie in the country, bar none. Joe D. made a great pie. He never allowed the dough to go through the machine -- everything was hand banged. Jerry Foley

Tom Glover said...
JERRY FOLEY! HOW GREAT TO HEAR FROM YOU! I REMEMBER WHEN YOU WERE WORKING WITH RICK JUST A FEW YEARS AGO. MY BEST TO YOUR DAD. I THINK OF YOUR FAMILY OFTEN WHEN I GET TO REMEMBER THE GOOD TIMES WE HAD IN "KAY'S FOLLIES" BACK IN THE 70'S WHEN YOU WERE A LITTLE RUG-RUNNER. TOM GLOVER

Yes, and I was annoying everyone during the practices at St. Anthony's and St. Joachim's... All the best. Jerry.