Search This Blog

Sunday, May 30, 2010

2010: MEMORIAL DAY, 2010

This photo brought tears to my eyes. Memorial Day is a helluva lot more than a barbecue, a trip to the shore, or a day off from work. It's a day when we should remember all those brave heroes who gave their lives that we might continue living in freedom in the greatest country in the world. Here's a staunch salute to all veterans everywhere, active, inactive, and those who went to be with the Lord.

I, and I dare say most of visitors to this blog would be standing tall right next to the patriot in the photo.
God HAS Blessed America!

Many thanks to my old friend and Navy vet , Francis "Bud" Foley
for sending me this very moving photo.

Saturday, May 29, 2010

1944: PLAAG'S GROVE-A SUMMER RESORT


The link above will bring you to my latest column for this last week in May. Click on that link and come back to the year 1944 with me and my buddy Don Slabicki as we make a nostalgic visit to the past. The photo is from Ms. Linda Wortelmann Taylor, a relative of the Plaag family. The photo is dated 1935, but that little ticket booth in the photo was just as it was during the years I write about in the column. The column tells of one of those many ethnic picnics my buddy Don Slabicki and I, and countless other neighborhood kids made to that grand old picnic ground that once reposed within the area of Sylvan, Edwin and Atkins Avenues in Hamilton Township. Come back with Don and me to a summer Sunday Polish picnic at Plaag's Grove; you're gonna have a great time!

1937: ALYCE FEEHAN, GIRL SCOUT

During this era, my brother Leonard, along with an old family friend, Webster "Webb" Grimm, were also doing the scouting thing in a boys' group known as the "LYNX" club. It was my pleasure to meet Ms. Alyce Feehan at the recent Kuser School centennial celebration, along with her sisters, including one of my contemporaries, Lorraine Feehan May, HHS '49. The Feehans are true pioneers from the Colonial Gardens area of Hamilton. Mrs. Feehan was one of the original dispatchers for the Colonial Volunteer Fire Company. Evelyn was a close friend of my late Sister-in-law, Dolores Britton. The photo of Alyce has been enhanced with cut and pasted vintage Girl Scout memorabilia from the 1930's

1937: FROM THE "HOLIDAYS" FOLD

True in 1937, even more true these 73 years later!

1937: A PERMANENT WAVE, 1937

I don't know how the lady could endure the discomfort of all those wires attached to her hair. One wonders if there is enough "play" in all those wires to allow for a hearty sneeze!

2010: FROM THE LIBRARY'S "WHIMSICAL" FOLDER

The message above has been circulating via email on the web for many years. Still, a copy is well worth preserving for present and future generations. It really shows how times have changed in these United States over the years. Unfortunately, there are pitifully few senior citizens from my generation and earlier who will read this very poignant observation relating to the societal changes which have occurred in America over the past 50, 60, or 70 years. How very innocent and tame our times were!

1955: TRENTON CATHOLIC CLASS OF 1955

Thanks to Mr. Ed Kiernan, TCBHS '55 for a collection of memorabilia from the late, great, "Golden Wave." I see my friends from my St. Anthony years, Nick Gregorio and Jack Kiernan from that class, also Andy Rabel, who may have been the same Andy Rabel who was my TV director for my "In Focus" TV show that was on TKR cable many years ago.

Thursday, May 27, 2010

1960: 50TH REUNION UPDATE

Thank you Bob Chianese for those very kind words relating to this blog; thank you Eleanor Guear for forwarding it to me. I am truly humbled. One may naturally wonder why I spend so much time posting these items of local interest. There is a personal method to my madness. I have begun this massive project with the expectation that as technology advances, the upcoming generations are going to look for those very things that I, and I dare say most of my visitors look for: connections to our younger years, connections to long lost relatives, friends, and other similar motives. I truly regret that I never took the time to ask my mom and dad about their young years. I had to get it from older relatives, and unfortunately the gleanings were quite trivial. Imagine if you will, the digital material on this blog surviving into the distant future. Perhaps it won't be on a 21st century " blog," but I am sure future technology will find a way to deliver this material to future generations. Most visitors to this blog share my enthusiasm. Thanks to folks like Bob Chianese, Eleanor Goldy, Ralph Lucarella, your own Cathy Csorgo and other contributors, we are logging local history one page at a time. So there you have it. I envision my grandchildren (who are currently too busy growing up), my great grandchildren, and future generations, to seek out sites such as this in order to get an idea of what it was like living in this wonderful area those many years ago. The goal of this blog is, and will remain to answer those 5 journalistic questions, WHO? WHAT" WHEN" WHERE" and WHY?

Oh, one more thing: I just noticed that Eileen DeSantis is in the class of '60.
Eileen is a dear friend who was part of our wonderful music group, "Wings of Song" at St. Anthony parish. Please pass on my best and ask one of the guys to give her a big hug and kiss for me!

1946: ED KIERNAN'S TRENTON CATHOLIC

Ed donated many wonderful items of memorabilia and the above represents just two of them. The one on the right reminds me of Jerry Fisher telling us public school kids about Trenton Catholic's "Demerit" system, and how easy it was to earn a demerit! There will be future TCBHS (Trenton Catholic Boys High School) from Ed's collection. Stay tuned.

1937: FRANKLIN, ROEBLING, MCCLELLAN, MOTT, AND MOSES SCHOOL

Here is another post from the Trenton Evening Times' 1937 series of articles on the schools in the city of Trenton. I have consolidated two of them into one graphic; more to come.

1940: GRANT SCHOOL AND HAMILTON SCHOOL

Two schools which no longer exist. The Hamilton School was located on the site of the current Roma Bank building in Chambersburg.

1923 and 1924: TRENTON'S JUNIOR 3, BEFORE AND A FTER

It's really great when historic material "comes together." The photo at the top of the page was extracted 6 years ago and filed as "hard copy." from the 1923 edition of the Trenton Times. All are now preserved in the "JUNIOR 3" folder in the Hamilton Library's Local History digital database.

1937: TRENTON TAXES 3RD LOWEST IN N.J.

"Once upon a time, in the city of Trenton, New Jersey......"

Wednesday, May 26, 2010

1937: The old McKinley School is No Longer Suitable for Students

The graphic reveals the obsolescence of what was once the high school for the city of Trenton. It was later converted to a grammar school. As you will read in the article, the school had become obsolete by the 1930's. The photo of the building was added f rom the "SCHOOLS-MISCELLANEOUS" folder in the Hamilton Library Local History digital database.

1919: PATROL OFFICERS JAKE THIEL AND HUGH SMYTH


From the "POLICE-TRENTON" folder: How nice it would be if we had neighborhood coverage such as that above with Jake Thiel or Hugh Smyth riding by and passing the time of day. Back in the old days, the beat policeman walked his neighborhood beat, while mounted officers like Jake and Hugh Smyth manned the horses.

1916: BASKETBALL RULES TRENTON EASTERN BASKETBALL LEAGUE

As can be seen in the graphic above, Ben Kuser was also quite active on the local sports scene. He was instrumental in selling of the land surrounding the old Fashion Stud Farm in Bromley, and also for the neighborhood in Bromley which today has streets named Adella, Victor and Rosalia.

Tuesday, May 25, 2010

2010: CAROL FRANCO, MEET DON WHITELEY

The following guest book entry was received today from Ms. Carol Franco:

"Lived in Yardville Heights in '48-'49 in house owned by Albrechts.

Don't know address. Knew Donald and Jerry Knott. Would like to hear from them.
cafranco6063@hotmail.com "

Carol, if you contact my friend Don Whiteley and visit his blog, chances are you will find interesting posts on Yardville Heights.
http://www.donwhiteley.com/

Comments

Close this window Jump to comment form
Blogger Holly Knott said...

Tom,

Thanks to you and Don Whitely, I have now put Carol in touch with my father, Mickey Knott (Jerry Knott's brother). Dad remembers Carol. Thank you, Tom, and Don, for your AMAZING internet collections of local history, and for how it helps bring people together!

Holly Knott, formerly of Yardville Heights, and Hamilton


1916:HISTORIC COMMUNION VESSEL AT HISTORIC ST. MICHAELS P.E. CHURCH TRENTON

You talk about antiquity! Not only do we have that inredibly historic St. Michael's P.E. church on North Warren Street, but the equally incredible graphic above; a communion vessel which was a gift from the English crown back in the early 1700's. I was confirmed and baptized in that historic old church on North Warren Street way, way back in my childhood.

1914 AND 1916: CADWALADER-ASBURY METHODIST CHURCH

"Seek and ye shall find!" The beauty of the computer lies in the fact that it never forgets! The graphic at the top of this post was placed on this blog a few years ago. I recently came upon the lower graphic, telling of the dedication of that grand old church in the West End of Trenton, known today as Cadwalader-Asbury M.E. Church; an incredibly beautiful architectural gem in the city of Trenton.

Monday, May 24, 2010

2001: REMEMBERING BILL BAGGOTT

Funny how visions of the past keep running through my mind. On Sunday night, I was watching the PBS presentation of the Lawrence Welk Show. At one point, Joe Feeney, the noted Irish tenor on the Welk show, sang the Irish classic "Too ra loo ra loo ra." I immediately had a vision of Bill Baggott singing that same song, only without the "twang" which is an inherent part of Joe Feeney's beautiful tenor voice. Back in the 1940's a guy by the name of Mel Torme' was dubbed the "Velvet Fog." "Velvet" in that apt description would have been quite appropriate for Bill Baggott. One would have to experience Bill's incredibly beautiful voice....especially in a song where he called forth an incredibly beautiful falsetto. That Welk program brought with it visions of all of us who were active in Louise Baird's Room 300 Hamilton High School choir back in mid-century Hamilton. I suddenly recalled those long ago operettas, singing once again with Lee Belardino, Clark Perry, Keith Kauffman, Bill Hellewell, Jack Pyrah, Jerry and Bob Miller, Bill Mathey, Joe McManimon, Jerry Black, and Bob Hayes. And who could forget those HHS choir girls? Betty Beiger, Mary Ann Cahill, Janet Hessler, Shirley Baker, Mary Lou Littwin, Joanne Feeser, Mary Pyrah, Shirley Whitebread, Beverly Cowell, Sylvia Arena, Arlene Seabridge, and Judy Britton. What beautiful music we made! Our harmony was incredible. It's the stuff dreams are made of folks; especially as I pile on the years!

1914: EDDIE PULLEN: AN AUTO RACING LEGEND

 
If you were to go through the newspapers from the golden age of the Mercer Automobile Company
during the early century, you would find many articles on the racing career of Eddie Pullen. Eddie's name became synonymous with the Mercer auto as he burned up many racetracks in America.

1986: THE MARTIN'S: A FICTIONAL BROAD STREET PARK DIARY

As noted in previous posts, I frequently use fictional characters in order to bring out the history of whichever subject I am writing about. The Martin family in the column above are fictional, but the persons, places and things are 100 percent accurate.

Sunday, May 23, 2010

2010: WHO IS THIS TOM GLOVER GUY?

An interview by Ms. Norine Longo of the "Hamilton Post" for their "People You Should Know" feature:

Tom Glover, Local History Collection Historian at the Hamilton Township Public Library.

Do you ever wonder about how things used to be? Does history really repeat itself? This man doesn't wonder; he knows.

One of Hamilton's own, Tom Glover is Hamilton Township Public Library's Local History Collection Historian. Having an impressive background serving our country and as a part of the amateur radio community since the mid '70s, this man comes full circle in his talents and wisdom.

If you haven't heard his name, you're missing out!

Even if your best subject isn't history, Tom Glover is still Someone You Should Know.

Q: What do you enjoy most about being the local historian at the Hamilton Township Public Library?

A: Finding new and exciting historical information relating to our local area. Also finding names, photos and articles relating to local folks who are still with us, or who are related. Example: Posting a class photo which includes a person who is related to one or more of the students. I have received numerous emails from the younger generation who were thrilled to see their grandmother, grandfather, or some other friend or relative from years past.

Q: If there was anyone you could go back in time to meet who would it be?

A: This is a difficult question to answer. There are many whom I would like to meet. I would guess it might be Ernest Thompson Seton, whose books on wildlife set me on the road to being a reader when I was a young boy. His book, “Wild Animals I Have Known” was written in a way that carried the reader right into the everyday life of the wolverine, wolf, shrike, falcon, or numerous other wildlife, each with a personality of its own.

The restrictive nature of the above question calls for an additional comment: There are MANY people whom I would like to meet AGAIN. The Misses Ruth Margerum and Louise Baird, the school teachers who were responsible for my undying love of music, Miss Emily C. Reynolds, who I only got to know as a child, Miss Julia McLain, my 6th grade Kuser School teacher who taught me the magic to be found in literature, Margaret Gaydos, my 8th grade Kuser School teacher who exposed me and my classmates to Shakespeare, Longfellow, Tennyson, and other literary giants. How I would love to sit down with any one of them today and reminisce!

Q: If you could pick one, what would you choose to be the most interesting thing about Hamilton’s history?

A: Interesting question. I would say that it was being able to witness the evolution of Hamilton Township from a very rural farming community into an evolving megalopolis, along with the proliferation of farms that evolved into the numerous housing developments we see today.

Q: You served in the US Army Security Agency, can you tell us about that?

A: I served as a veteran of “The Cold War.” The Army Security Agency was a secret “Cloak and Dagger” organization whose mission was and is top secret. The fact that the ASA is still a viable “Cloak and Dagger” entity suggests that I maintain my age old pledge to not talk about my work, except to say that I was a Morse intercept operator. No one has given me the authority to reveal what we did. Suffice to say it was a “hush hush” organization utilizing the top ten percent of inductees into the military, and based upon the test results of the U.S. Army’s “AFQT” (Armed Forces Qualification Test).

Q: How did you decide what you wanted to be and do for a living? What necessary steps did you take to get you to the point that you are at now?

A: I so wanted to be a teacher when I graduated from Hamilton High School in 1951. However, my mom and dad couldn’t afford the $900 tuition to Trenton State Teachers’ College. I ultimately ended up giving 40 plus years to a “Mom and Pop” business who promised great things when we organized back in 1960 or so. The business was a moderate success, and my buddy and I were sure we would replace the two principles when they retired.

I was given the heady title of “Secretary” of the new company, and my buddy was the “Treasurer.” However, the principles each had two sons who were given the reins to the business. Unfortunately, the company went chapter 11 just as my buddy retired, and I was about to retire, and the inventory and assets were sold to a northern New Jersey company. Bottom line: I found myself retired at 62 with no pension, no medical insurance, and a very challenging start to retirement.

I will be eternally grateful to former Council President Jack Lacy for getting me a position in the Circulation Desk at the Hamilton Library, where I worked full time for 4 or 5 years. I subsequently approached Mayor Jack Rafferty and proposed filling in a long standing void for a local history repository at the Hamilton Township Public Library. Jack Rafferty, Mo Rossi, and Joe Belina were apparently impressed with my proposal and agreed to create today’s Local History Collection which is where I am today, and hope to be until I am no longer physically or mentally able to function.

Q: You also have a background in amateur radio. Can you tell us about your experiences with that? What interests you about radio? Your favorite thing about radio?

A: The computer age is so wonderful! I have always been a lover of “OTR;” which those of us in the hobby know of as Old Time Radio. I love to listen to the radio programs of my youth. Thanks to the digital age, I have literally hundreds of hours of old time radio programs in what is known as MP3 format. I could never begin to list all the programs I have on a separate storage disk. Example: World War II radio news programs with Edward R. Murrow, Elmer Davis, Frank Singizer, Gabriel Heatter, etc. Also “The Lux Radio Theater,” “Terry and the Pirates,” “Dragnet,” my favorite boyhood radio program, “Hop Harrigan, America’s Ace of the Airways,” and…..well I could go on forever.

As to my amateur radio career, It began back in the 1970s when I passed my “General” class FCC license. I purchased my first radio from an amateur radio friend, and talked all over the world with other “hams.” My other little two meter UHF radio was a constant companion for me as I talked with a select group of fellow hams as I commuted to and from New Brunswick during the '70s through the late '80s. The hobby has taken a back seat in my life due to the extremely high cost of amateur gear, the marked downturn in local 2 meter activity, and also to the new highly technical facets of the hobby which are beyond my technical ability to comprehend. I have great respect for those guys and gals who are into the latest hi-tech digital evolution of the hobby. I made many dear friends in the amateur fraternity, and really miss our daily mobile “Commuter Net.”

Q: How do you think radio will evolve in the near future?

A: Commercial broadcast radio has descended (or ascended, depending upon your age and point of view) into a medium for the younger generation. When one turns from 88 TO 108 on the FM dial, it becomes apparent that the music matrix is aimed at the 18 to 45 generation who love “rock” music in all its forms, or “rap” and other loud and crass “music” which is aimed at the 18-49 year old “demographic.” Gone are the Jack Pintos of the world disk jockeys who brought us truly listenable music. (Jack Pinto from WBUD was one of my favorite radio personalities.) I have found refuge in XM satellite radio where I can play music geared to my personal taste. XM and Sirius radio do not have to yield to the 18 to 45 demographics while the commercial radio stations depend on them. I personally don’t approve of the crude and sometimes foul and bawdy language I hear on some of the stations.

Q: As a frequent blogger of a variety of interesting topics, when did you begin blogging? How did you come to the decision that this was something you were going to partake in? How did you begin and what have you done since your starting point to draw in readers and followers?

A: I began blogging in November, 2005 with “Tom Glover’s Hamilton Scrapbook.” (http://www.glover320.blogspot.com/). The very large collection of persons, places, and things relating to the local area of Mercer County grew and grew, and I felt compelled to make them available to the public. My first interest is unearthing material on Hamilton Township, then Trenton, then the surrounding Mercer County area. I love to uncover obscure or little known news items from as far back as I can go.

The response to this website is about to reach 150,000 visitors; far above my wildest estimates. The very sad part of the situation is that there are pitifully few senior citizens in my age category who are interested in learning the basics of computer technology, and are thus denied an experience they would truly treasure. They would be the one segment of the population that would benefit most from the 3,000 plus posts that are on the site as of today.

Q: What do you find inspires you most (in your writing, in life)?

A: Many people ask how I can remember so many details of my early years. I have inherited my mother’s fantastic memory. I can recall the most remote details of seemingly insignificant events from as far back as my early grammar school years. When my readers write and tell me they how they enjoy or relate to my columns, or my websites, or my music presentations, it makes all hard work worthwhile.

Q: Where is your favorite place to visit in Hamilton?

A: Kuser Farm. I worked for Fred and Edna Kuser from the age of 13 right up to my marriage in 1954. My brother Bud preceded me, starting with the Kusers in 1940, and my younger brother Donnie worked there for a short while after I left. The Kuser Farm holds very special memories for me. It was in that very rural environment that I learned to love rural living. I find it a wonderful place to walk, meditate, and commune with God and nature.

Q: What is the earliest memory you have of becoming interested in automotive, radio communications, and aircraft history?

A: Every boy has a special place in his heart for the automobile. My buddy Don Slabicki and I began driving on Kuser Farm when we were 13 years old. I was the owner of a 1961 “Rambler” and also a 1940 Buick “Special” during my antique auto years.

It became a rich man’s hobby and I had to give it up. My interest in airplanes goes back to my WWII years. My oldest brother Len flew 30-plus missions over Nazi Germany as a waist gunner on a B-24 “Liberator.” That and the fact that my brother Bud taught me the fascinating hobby of building airplane models kept me interested in airplanes. I could still identify the sound of an old Douglas DC3 (or the military version C47) if it were to pass overhead today. The same goes for a P51 Mustang, and the whistle of a P39 Bell Airacobra.

Q: Based on your experience, how do you think Hamilton has evolved as a town over time? Where do you think it will go from here?

A: At the risk of sounding jaded, I miss the small town, rural character that was once Hamilton Township. I’m sure that sentiment is due to my advancing age, and equally sure that there are numerous others of my generation who share that sentiment.

My generation grew up in an era that was less complicated. We spent much more time in the great outdoors, before all the modern digital appliances, video and video games, and other leisure distractions became a part of everyday living. I miss that big open front porch on my Hartley Avenue home, where we played cards and games, talked about our girlfriends, and had the chance to commune with our neighbors on their front porches.

As to the question of where Hamilton will go from here, I envision a growing and burgeoning community with ever increasing traffic problems. I remember Route 33 when it was bounded by farms, Kuser Road when it was a two lane road with foliage that slapped your windshield if you made way for an oncoming vehicle, Route 25 (today’s Route 130) when it was also a country highway. We have changed from a very charming rural farming community to a highly populated and growing metropolis in the short span of 50 years, but I love Hamilton and will spend the rest of my days here.

Saturday, May 22, 2010

1983: THE LATE, GREAT FARMINDALE SCHOOL

I HAVE BEEN WRITING FOR THE LOCAL PRESS FOR MORE THAN 30 YEARS. IN ALL THOSE YEARS, I ONLY MISSED ONE DEADLINE, AND THAT WAS FOR AN EMERGENCY VISIT TO THE HOSPITAL FOR GALL BLADDER SURGERY. 52 WEEKS IN A YEAR: 520 COLUMNS WHILE I WAS WRITING FOR THE MERCER MESSENGER, NOT COUNTING A SHORT TERM COLUMN IN THE TRENTON TIMES FOR ANOTHER YEAR OR SO PLUS MY CURRENT BI-WEEKLY "SENTIMENTAL JOURNEY" COLUMN IN THE TIMES MAKES FOR A HUGE COLLECTION OF COLUMNS. WHEN I STARTED, THE COMPUTER WAS JUST IN ITS BEGINNING STAGES AS A "PERSONAL COMPUTER." THE WORD PROCESSOR I USED WAS A RELIC CALLED "WORD STAR." I AM DIGITIZING MY COLUMNS AND HAVE COME TO REALIZE THAT IT WILL BE A MONUMENTAL TASK. THERE ARE TONS OF PAST COLUMNS. MY FAVORITES HAVE ALWAYS BEEN THOSE DEALING WITH MY SCHOOL DAYS, AND GROWING UP IN MY HARTLEY AVENUE NEIGHBORHOOD. THE ABOVE ARTICLE WAS ONE OF MY EARLIER ONES DEALING WITH FARMINGDALE SCHOOL.

This rare ledger sheet from Farmingdale School represents a document from one of Hamilton's oldest grammar schools. It dates back to the earliest years of the public school system. Farmingdale was one of the oldest schools in the township. The ledger has numerous names of township citizens who attended the school, and I suspect it would be an interesting reference to those who are interested in local genealogy.

1988: JAMES RUSLING'S BROAD STREET PARK

I use a number of "angles" when I am writing a story. Such is the case above where I wrote using a fictional interview with the late James Rusling. The fictional interview is fictional only to the extent that it was conducted by a Messenger reporter. All the statements made Mr.
Rusling are factual. The engraving of Mr. Rusling has been added to the article as written back in May, 1988.

1987: WILLIAM V. MCGALLIARD: DICK JOHNSON REMEMBERS

If General George Washington hadn't rode through the hamlet of White Horse way back in the 1700's, giving the village the name White Horse, chances are we would be calling that Hamilton area McGalliardville. Here's an article I wrote many years ago retelling the events surrounding the 75th birthday of Will McGalliard. I have inserted a clearer photo of the McGalliard log cabin at the bottom of the article. You are looking at the property across White Horse-Mercerville Road* with McGalliard Avenue on the left. It is reminiscences such as that from Mr. Dick Johnson that add so much to the historic background of Hamilton. Unfortunately, too few people take the time to share their experiences.

*Thanks to an anonymous visitor for correcting the above address. I erroneously placed the location as White Horse-Hamilton Square Road.
(Another of my senior moments.)

December 4. 2014: Thanks to Ms. Eleanor Guear for noting that the above graphic was missing and is not back where it was posted originally.

Thursday, May 20, 2010

1945: BOCCI: AN ITALIAN CLASSIC

There is a group of avid Bocci players who gather at the Bocci court at Kuser Farm. Bocci is a sport that requires substantial skill and is a real treat for those of us who are not adept at the sport. Above is the schedule for the Trenton Bocci League, 1945.

1945: Frank Iorio: "Lest We Forget

This one's for you, Chuck Rotondo:
Those who have followed my newspaper columns and posts I have made on this site can testify to the fact that I have the greatest respect for those brave men and women who have served in the military throughout the years; especially those who made the ultimate sacrifice. The above graphic came as the result of an email I received from an altar boy who remembers me from my years as a Lector, Eucharistic Minister, and singer during my years at St. Anthony parish in Hamilton. True to my blog slogan, "Local History With a Personal Touch," I proudly post this notice of a St. Joachim memorial service for WWII patriot, Frank Iorio.

Wednesday, May 19, 2010

1956: ANOTHER MEMBER OF THE HHS CLASS OF '56 PASSES

Note: I deleted a hyperlink attached to this obit that is incorrect and inaccessible.
==============================
This from Jack Lacy, HHS '56:

Sorry to be the bearer of bad news, classmates, but somebody has to do it. You can send condolences to the funeral home or to Russ and family at: 47 Farragut Dr., Brick, NJ 08723. Unfortunately the calendar and Father Time keeps making our class roster shorter.

Jack

Joan P. (Smith) Knott

BRICK - Joan P. (Smith) Knott, 73, passed away Monday at Ocean County Hospital in Brick. Mrs. Knott was born in Trenton. She formerly resided in Columbus, NJ, and currently in Brick, NJ, and Largo, FLA. She is survived by her husband of 53 years, Russell H. Knott; two sons and daughters- in-law, Martin R. and Laurie Knott of New Egypt, NJ, and Kenneth V. and Suzan Knott of Perkiomenville, PA; five grandchildren, Cathy, Patricia, Daniel, Morgen and Hayden Knott. Funeral services will be at 10 a.m. Friday at Knott's Colonial Funeral Home, 2946 S. Broad St., Hamilton. Rev. Linda Thurston, pastor of St. Mark Lutheran Church, will officiate. Relatives and friends may call 4-6 p.m. and 7-9 p.m. Thursday at the funeral home. Memorial donations may be made to Lance Armstrong Foundation Events, (memo 289965750) at Lance Armstrong Foundation, Post Office Box 6002, Albert Lea, MN 56007-6002.

1989: TOM GLOVER'S MAPLES SHADE SCHOOL AND WHITE HORSE

I wrote this White Horse related article which appeared with the Mercer Messenger's feature on historic persons, places, and things from Hamilton Township's historic past. The two photos have been added.

Tuesday, May 18, 2010

1938: TERNSTEDT DIVISION OF GENERAL MOTORS COMES TO EWING

Jobs, jobs, and more jobs! When the huge GM plant in Ewing opened in 1938, there were hundreds of local citizens who found employment in an economy that was tenuous; indeed, an economy still in the throes of the "Great Depression." I dare say nearly every local citizen knew someone who worked at one of the strongest and reliable employers in the state of New Jersey. Mercer County lost a giant of industry when this giant factory closed.

1938: A HOOK AND LADDER TRUCK FOR TRENTON FIRE DEPARTMENT?

Here's a fascinating photo of a proposed "hook and ladder" fire truck which was proposed for the Trenton Fire Department back in 1938. It is unknown whether this particular model was the one which was finally chosen. I have great respect and admiration for the guy who mans the steering apparatus on the end of the vehicle. That takes skill, my friends!

Monday, May 17, 2010

1885: THE NEW MASONIC HALL - W. STATE AND N. WARREN STS.

This article tells of the cornerstone laying ceremony surrounding the construction of an exquisitely beautiful landmark that once graced the downtown Trenton area. Look closely at the photo and you will get an idea of the immensity and beauty of the building. Unfortunately, like many old Trenton landmarks, the beautiful architectural example became the victim of the wrecker's ball, to be replaced by a bank.

1884: THE CIVIL WAR 20 YEARS LATER`

The highlighted segment of this graphic focuses on the newly formed Confederate Veterans society founded by Confederate Civil War veterans. Patterned after the Union "GAR," (Grand Army of the Republic). In the spirit of unity, the new organization decorated both Union and Confederate veterans who died in the conflict. Newspapers from this post-Civil War era were filled with many stories of atrocities still being committed by pro-Confederate and anti-Union southern citizens.

1884: STILL EXPERIMENTING WITH NEWS PAGES

1889: VILLA PARK-IN THE VERY BEGINNING

Here is a real estate ad from the new Villa Park. Note that the branch office was located in "The Homestead." I would ask any Villa Park historian if he or she has information on the location of the homestead, is it still there, and better still, a photo would be great!

Saturday, May 15, 2010

1889: BARNUM AND BAILEY CIRCUS COMES TO TRENTON

How very appropriate! Just as the Barnum & Bailey Circus comes to Trenton in May 2010, so too did the circus arrive in Trenton on May 1st 122 years ago! This ad was originally one long column taking up a full page of the Daily State Gazette. In order to bring it to a computer monitor for the best legibility, I had to break it down from one column to 3. I also had to give it a bit of circus color with the yellow and red enhancementsm and the little graphic on the lower right which I downloaded from the web. Of particular interest is the location on "North Clinton Street near Hart Avenue."

1880: LOCAL HAPPENINGS - JULY 1880

The above graphic is an experiment I am performing with my tabloid scanner. Unfortunately, the pages of the Gazette from this era requires two separate scans and the "stitching" process. Adding to the problem, the file is huge. I have reduced the size by eliminating 3 of the 7 columns on one page.

1934: Gazette "All City Baseball Awards"

These are some of the giant of local sports from the 1930's and 40's. I can't recall specific names but I would bet that my best buddy Don Slabicki and I saw one or more of these players at Wetzel Field during our nightly visits to that grand old ball park as young teens. And to Ralph Lucarells, one of my favorite old time visitors to this site, I would venture a guess that you were on first name basis with most of the guys in the article above. Please continue to enhance these graphics with your first person retrospectives, Ralph. Your comments are very much appreciated, add to the local color, and take us back to times we all love to re-visit.

1834: THIS FROM AMERICA'S "PURITANICAL PAST"

Whoa; referring to the article above: Wouldn't the ACLU have a ball with that one!
Many of my fellow senior citizens from a more conservative era in America, still look on in complete amazement as we look upon the changes that have taken place in America's moral attitudes and the resulting tear in our social fabric. A "culture war" rages in 21st century America. Indeed we have transformed ourselves into a "permissive society." America's social fabric is stretching to the
limit. I would suggest that this "enlightened" age came about in the early 60's when nearly all social values were re-established by the more socially liberal members of society. Today's motion picture industry, the print media, and the media in general have capitalized on that moral shift, and as a result we are seeing graphic scenes that in my generation were left to the imagination. One wonders whatever happened to the Catholic "Legion of Decency" which flagged those motion pictures which were obscene, objectionable, or unacceptable viewing. "We've come a long way, baby!" as that Virginia Slims ad use to tell us. Our grandchildren, like Pavlov's dogs, are being spoon-fed ideas and notions that were completely taboo to those of us who grew up in an "un-enlightened" society. God help us.

1940's - 50's & 60's: HAMILTON HIGH SCHOOL: YOU HAD TO BE THERE


To those who are out of the circulation area of "THE TIMES," I am posting these graphics to remind you that my "SENTIMENTAL JOURNEY" column in today's (Saturday, May 15) "THE TIMES" can be accessed from this website by clicking on
http://www.nj.com/columns/times/index.ssf?tomglover. If you were a student at HHS during those years, and even if you were from another high school during that era, you will relate to those innocent years when drugs were sold at the drug store, and "Coke" was CocaCola.

Friday, May 14, 2010

1934: MOSES SCHOOL STUDENTS PRESENT A CIRCUS

By the 1930's, the newspaper industry had perfected the art of offset photography, as can be seen in the graphic above.

1934: TRENTON HIGH vs CATHEDRAL

There's that recurring name "Jiggs" Corrado again. I remember the "grownups" talk about him when I was a boy. There were "Jiggs" in my memory bank: Corrado and Arena....and don't miss George Case, a local Trenton boy who went on to be a hero with the Washington Senators. In later life, many older visitors will remember Case's Sporting Goods store.