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Friday, April 30, 2010

Aww, come on, visitors.... Help me out here!

SINCE I PUT THE ANNOUNCEMENT BELOW ON THIS BLOG ON APRIL 27, THERE HAVE BEEN 840 "HITS." UNFORTUNATELY, ONLY 3 VISITORS HAVE TAKEN THE FEW SECONDS TO SEND ME AN ACKNOWEDGMENT EMAIL SO I CAN REBUILD MY CONTACTS LIST. PLEASE.....JUST SEND AN EMAIL TO MY NEW OPTIMUM EMAIL ADDRESS BELOW. I HAVE LOST MY VERIZON CONTACT WITH THE POWER FAILURE AND THE RESULTING CORRUPTION OF MY WINDOWS XP SOFTWARE.

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A VERY IMPORTANT ANNOUNCEMENT!

EFFECTIVE IMMEDIATELY, I HAVE SIGNED ON TO OPTIMUM "TRIPLE PLAY." I HAVE CANCELED MY VERIZON ACCOUNT. IF YOU HAVE SENT AN EMAIL TO THOMGLO1@VERIZON.NET WITHIN THE LAST DAY OR TWO, I CANNOT RESPOND AND ASK THAT YOU RE-SEND IT TO MY NEW EMAIL ADDRESS:

TGLOVER320@optimum.net

Thursday, April 29, 2010

REMEMBER: MY NEW EMAIL ADDRESS:

tglover320@optimum.net

PLEASE TAKE THE TIME TO SEND ME A CONFIRMING
EMAIL SO I CAN ADD YOUR ADDRESS TO MY EMAIL ADDRESS DIRECTORY.

==========================

I WILL BE REPEATING THIS NOTE FOR THE

NEXT FEW WEEKS, AND ALSO INCORPORATE IT
IN MY MAY 8th TRENTON TIMES COLUMN.
If you have been reading my columns over the past 25 years, you will remember the very important part my best all time friend Don Slabicki played in my years. Don and I grew up together. attended Kuser Grammar School, and graduated together as members of the class of 1951 at Hamilton High. I am proud to say that after all these years, he is still my my best friend, even though we are no longer neighbors, Don and his lovely wife Mae moved to Columbus. As to the photo: Note that Don had his very own "Deuce and a half" with his name on the door!

A VERY IMPORTANT ANNOUNCEMENT!

EFFECTIVE IMMEDIATELY, I HAVE SIGNED ON TO OPTIMUM "TRIPLE PLAY." I HAVE CANCELED MY VERIZON ACCOUNT. IF YOU HAVE SENT AN EMAIL TO THOMGLO1@VERIZON.NET WITHIN THE LAST DAY OR TWO, I CANNOT RESPOND AND ASK THAT YOU RE-SEND IT TO MY NEW EMAIL ADDRESS:

TGLOVER320@optimum.net

I have been contemplating this move for many months. Verizon service has been incredibly POOR. The waiting time is completely unacceptable....sometimes up to 35 minutes listening to elevator music with no one to assure that the connection is still viable. Additionally, I have been receiving "We are having technical difficulties. Please try again later" (!!!) Completely unacceptable.


THANK YOU FOR YOUR PATIENCE AND INDULGENCE.


TOM

1930: MERCER AIRPORT WAS ONLY A FEW YEARS OLD


I remember when Mercer Airport was a small field which basically catered to the Piper Cubs, Aeroncas, and other privat aircraft. Franklin Machine Company and the Smith Bearing Company once had factories along the road where the airport is located.

1930: PIERCE ARROW CELEBRATES 29 YEARS

BlockquoteI will be presenting a program for the Central Jersey Antique club in a few weeks. One of the items in the presentation will include the above graphic. There is no more interesting subject than the evolution of the horseless carriage. My "AUTOMOBILIA" digital database is growing rapidly.

Tuesday, April 27, 2010

1930: HERMITAGE AND EDGEWOOD AVENUES

SStill another of those great old pics of Trenton of yore! This one's for you, Sally Gilman, one of my earliest visitors. Don't miss the "STRAND" theater on the immediate left.
NOTE: I LEFT THIS IN A FULL SIZE SCAN SO YOU CAN ENLARGE IT AND TAKE A WALK IN THAT GREAT OLD NEIGHBORHOOD!
THE STREET

1930: SO. BROAD AND BEATTY: DANGEROUS!

How I do love these old photos of various areas of Trenton and the surrounding area which show the way things looked way back in my Mom and Dad's years. This now digitized photo has been reposing in my "TRENTON-VIEWS OF" folder for nigh on to 24 years. It now sees the bright lights of the year 2010, 80 years later!

Monday, April 26, 2010

1938: IMMACULATE CONCEPTION BASKETBALL

These boys went on to become Trenton Catholic Boy's High School. They were among the tough teams that our Hamilton High Varsity teams played. There were many very exciting basketball, football and baseball games in those years.

1936: BATHING IN THE DELAWARE

I made this trip on a number of occasions as a boy. As I recall, the beach had quite a few surface stones; not at all like the beach one would find at Gropp's Lake. I also recall going to the "Gravel Pits" over in the Penn Valley area of Morrisville, where there was also a stony beach. As to the graphic above, the Delaware even then was a bit polluted, but not like it is today,.

Saturday, April 24, 2010

1938: TRENTON POLICE OFFICER CHORAZY'S SOUTH TRENTON "BEAT"

Strictly by coincidence, my"Sentimental Journey" column in today's edition of "THE TIMES" deals with the arrival of radio communications at the Trenton and Hamilton police forces. I am currently searching
and digitizing interesting historic police activity in my collection of local newspapers from the past 100-plus years. The graphic is just a single even from the little pad which recorded the incidents which Trenton Patrolman Chorazy kept while on his Mill Hill - South Trenton beat. These records were kept by each patrolman on the beat in years gone by. When this little bit of history has been digitized and placed in the "POLICE-TRENTON," "POLICE-HAMILTON," AND "SOUTH TRENTON" folders in the Hamilton Library's digital collection, it will be sent over to Mr Mo Crosby at the Trenton Police Museum to be added to their fine collection of Trenton's much respected and historic police department.

BY THE WAY. IF YOU CLICK ON THE "AUDIO" BUTTON AT THE TOP OF THE HOME PAGE, YOU SHOULD LINK TO ONE OF MY "CALLING ALL CARS" 30 MINUTE RADIO PROGRAMS. IT WORKS WHEN I ACCESS IT, HOW ABOUT YOU?
PLEASE LET ME KNOW (thomglo1!verizon.net).

1938: THE STAFF OF THE "ARGUS" YEARBOOK

My friend Gus Perilli is an active member of the Junior 4 Alumni Association which meets here at the Hamilton Library on a monthly basis. I have been printing these photos out for Gus, at the same time encouraging him to get into computing and enjoy endless trips back to not only Junior 4, but the Chambersburg of his youth. He and his brother Maury are dear friends, and have a wealth of memories growing up in the Chambersburg area of their youth. As to the photo above, those in the photo are probably in the 17 year old age bracket, and in their late 80's today. God bless them.

1920's: Circa early 20th Century Hill Refrigeration

The above bronze "Hill's Refrigerator" identification relic probably came from one of those old oak refrigerators from the early years of the company. It was buried about 6 inches under an area filled with junk metals. Setting the detector to discriminate between iron and steel, resulted in a very pronounced signal. One of the more interesting aspects of metal detecting lies in the possibility of finding rarities such as the one illustrated.

Wednesday, April 21, 2010

IF NJ ASSEMBLY BILL A2555 PASSES, SAY GOODYBYE TO THIS BLOG!

All film historians recall that famous closing scene in the 1931 Warner Brothers movie, "Little Caeser," where "Rico," played by Edward G. Robinson, utters those now famous words, "Mother of Mercy, is this the end of Rico?"
That quote will apply to this 4,200-plus page blog which will soon reach a quarter of a million visits if that draconian Assembly bill A2555 is passed. The graphic above gives a bit more detail. Lack of space prevents me from including the MANY other Hamilton Library services which will be curtailed, along with the resulting hardships which will be placed on students, the unemployed, the children's room, and other citizens who have sought the services of the library during these troublesome financial times.
If this blog is important to you, I urge you to call or email Assemblywoman Linda Greenstein and Assemblyman Wayne DeAngelo and ask them to oppose this bill. Also, ask everyone in your personal circle who appreciate the very necessary services provided by your local library to contact the N.J. Assembly. The email addresses and phone numbers are in the bottom of the graphic.

2010: FAREWELL GEORGE, YOU WERE THE BEST

Hamilton Township has lost a legendary member of "The Greatest Generation" in the passing of former Hamilton Police Chief George Zimmer. As can be seen in the obit from this morning's TIMES, Zimmer was also a hero of WWII. You will be missed, sir; you and your family are in our prayers.

Tuesday, April 20, 2010

1942: CAROLE LOMBARD DIES IN A PLANE CRASH

I would estimate that 1 or 2 percent of the visitors to this blog are in the over 70 generation. That generation, of which I am proud to lay claim, remembers the world-wide and tragic news of the death of Ms. Lombard who died while on a Defense Bond Drive for the war effort. I remember the sentiment and love the average American had for Ms. Lombard and her husband Clark Gable. With the aforementioned observation that there are very few WWII veterans who visit this site, I would ask that all you "youngsters" who are on the web, print this out and hand it to grandma or grandpa.

1942: EARLY WWII SECURITY THREATS

My over-70 generation vividly recall those air raid sirens, blackouts, and the dreaded
"Fifth Column." The above article tells of the numerous threats to America during those few months following the attack on Pearl Harbor. Although Russia was an ally fighting with us against the Axis powers, America still recognized the threat that the rampant Communist infiltration was bringing. As to the "Fifth Column," every industrial city and town worried that one of their major industries would be attacked.

Monday, April 19, 2010

1942: MY THANKS TO A HAPPY VISITOR

I had a visit from Charlie Smith, HHS '42 Reunion member this morning confirming my appearance at the class of 1942 reunion at Tessara's Restaurant in October 2010. This will be my 3rd year bringing "The Music We Grew Up With" to those fellow Hamilton Hornets from "The Greatest Generation." It is a distinct privilege to stir the hearts and souls of those wonderful Hamiltonians who gave us the America we live in these 65-plus years later.

One of the wonderful aspects of hosting this blog is receiving emails such as this from a fellow Hamilton Hornet who has discovered the wealth of history and nostalgia to be gleaned from the 4,200-plus pages. Following is the email I received and really appreciate.
(Note: Without permission, this fellow Hornet's identity is withheld)
I found your site a while back and have spent many hours going through it. My dad was a l942 graduate and I am a 1964 graduate so this has been a real joy for me. Not only do I get to look at HHS-W history, I get to see some of the people I have heard my dad talk about for years. I am sure there is no way to thank you for what you do and I can certainly appreciate your effort as just trying to do a family history is an enormous challenge and you have created a history for thousands of people. Please be assured it is greatly appreciated and I have sent the site to everyone I can think of so that they to can enjoy and share with you. "ever will loyal be" thanks.

1940: JUNIOR FOUR SPRING CONCERT

Music and other cultural activities were alive and well in the Junior 4 of yesteryear. Here we have a write up telling of the school's presentation of "Musical Moments."

1945: STARS AND STRIPES COMIC STRIPS

Any member of "the Greatest Generation" who accesses this blog will surely relate to the above comic strip page from the "Stars and Stripes" which was the daily paper issued for the armed forces all over the world. This page is from a Stars and Stripes from the ETO (European Theater of Operations.) Ten years later, I would be seated at a table in our local PX in Bavaria and ultimately Northern Italy, reading the same comic strips, and doing the very popular crossword puzzle. However, I think we had Milton Caniff's "Steve Canyon" instead of "Terry and the Pirates." Thanks to my dear friend, Maury Perilli for a copy ot the June 13, 1945 issue of the Stars and Stripes.

1997: HAMILTON OBSERVER STAFF WRITERS

Even though it seems like only yesterday, (as most things occur to those of us in the senior citizen community,) the above clip from a 13 year old "HAMILTON OBSERVER" Thanksgiving greeting has entered the hallowed halls of the Local History Collection's "NOSTALGIA" folder.

1980: FIRE AT BROMLEY PROVISIONS PLANT

1942: JAPANESE, GERMANS AND ITALIANS FACE RESTRICTIONS

Early in WWII, I remember the mental panic many Americans went through as increasing incidents of fifth column sabotage were happening all over America. During that early period of the war, Japanese submarines were sighted off the coast of California and there was an incident or two where they actually lobbed shells onto the mainland. German U-Boats were seen off the Atlantic coast. Germany, Italy and Japan were all a part of what were termed "Axis" countries with whom America was at war. Unfortunately, many pro-America citizens whose lineage was traced to the Axis countries were also victims of the restrictions. Naturally, there were many at the time who were against the restrictions, However, fifth column fever was running high and the majority of Americans approved of the restricted areas.

Saturday, April 17, 2010

1942: 1942-1943 HAMILTON TOWNSHIP SCHOOL BUDGET

As they said in that old Virginia Slims commercial, "You've come a long way, Baby!" Wow; just look at those budget numbers from a more rural Hamilton Township! Back when I was growing up, a teacher's salary was meagre; indeed the average teacher was under-paid. There was a Superintendent and no top heavy burearucracy with Assistants, Assistant to the Assistant, and on and on. I remember Miss Ruth Margerum, my 3rd grade teacher telling my mother at a PTA meeting something to the effect that as a teacher she didn't expect to be wealthy, but the rewards of teaching far out-weighed the financial shortcomings. Yep, they were the good old days. If a student fell behind the rest of the class in his or her studies, he or she repeated the grade. If a student was un-ruly and out of step with the rest of the class he or she got an audience with Miss Reynolds, the Principal, the teacher, and the parent. If that conference didn't change the student's behavior, he or she faced expulsion. I have a reputation of having great respect for those in the field of education. Indeed, in the early 80's when I began writing, I observed that teachers had every right to receive a salary commensurate with that of any other professional. However, over the years, the pendulum has started to swing in the opposite direction. A recent New York Post story told of New York City teachers who had been spending the school day in what was known as "the rubber room;" a room set aside where a teacher who committed illegal acts in various ways was removed from the classroom, isolated from the regular class rooms and still drawing his or her salary. The teachers' union protect its own; firing is not an option.

Thursday, April 15, 2010

1938: St. Anthony Class of '38 Graduates

Here's the class of '38 at St. Anthony Trenton listing the graduates and also various awards. Many familiar names in the list of families who are still communicants.

1938: TYPING AWARD RECIPIENTS TO COMMERCIAL STUDENTS

My friend Gus Perilli is active in the Junior 4 Alumni Association which meets monthly here in the Hamilton Township Public Library lower meeting room. I have been saving these post and printing them out for Gus. (Few of the older Jr. 4 alumni are on the computer, and this is the only way I can get them to visit their various years at Jr. 4 and Grace Dunn.

Wednesday, April 14, 2010

2010: HEADS UP: ROEBLING: A VERY INTERESTING TOUR


Thanks to Patricia Millen, Curator at the Roebling Museum for this press release which will be of interest to those interested in Trenton history:

For Immediate Release

April 12, 2010

Contact: Patricia Millen

Roebling Museum

609-499-7200

E-mail: patricia.millen@ roeblingmuseum.org

Roebling Museum to Host Roebling Heritage in Trenton Tours

Fundraising bus tour to view Roebling sites in Trenton and Roebling

Roebling, Florence Township, NJ

Join historians and docents on Saturday, May 8 at sites in Trenton and Roebling relating to the legacy of John A. Roebling and the Roebling Sons’ Company. Visitors will view the Roebling collections at the Trenton City Museum, the statue of John A. Roebling in Cadwalader Park and admire the Roebling stained glass windows and iconography at the Trinity Cathedral. Bus riders will tour by the sites of the former Roebling family homes in Trenton and the sites of the historic mills; with a final stop at Riverview cemetery to view the Roebling graves.

Tours leave from the Roebling Museum in Roebling promptly at 10:30 am and 1:30 pm. Tours last approximately two and one half hours. Tickets include entrance to the Roebling Museum and a walking tour brochure of the National historic landmark Village of Roebling. Snacks and water for the bus riders is provided. Price is $30 per seat; $25 for members of the Roebling or Trenton City Museum. (Not recommended for children under 12) Advanced reservations strongly suggested by calling to reserve your seat; remaining tickets will be sold the day of the trip based upon availability.

The Roebling Museum is dedicated to telling the story of John A. Roebling’s Sons Company located in Roebling and Trenton, the village of Roebling and the innovations and technological achievements of the family that changed the industrialized world.

The museum is located on 100 Second Avenue in Roebling. Parking is available at the back of the museum at 1495 Hornberger Avenue beyond the Light Rail Station. Visitors may take the Light Rail; the museum is a short walk from the Roebling stop. For more information call the museum offices at 609-499-7200—and visit the WEB site @ www.roeblingmuseum.org.

1938: Ca. 1938 GIRLS' DANCE RECITAL

Aren't they lovely? Back when the feminine mystique was in fashion. Unfortunately, the date and actual source on this photo is missing. However, I am sure it is from the Trenton Times, and it was on a scrapbook page with other clippings dated 1938.

1938: MARIJUANA IN 1930'S SOCIETY

Maybe you saw that campy move, "Reefer Magic," wherein a clean cut young man goes absolutely bananas while under the influence of the weed. Strangely, there is little mention of drug use in the newspapers of the past. Perhaps an occasional article on Opium, and another here and there, but certainly nowhere near the plague that drugs have become in the latter part of the 20'th century into the present.

1937: JUNIOR 3 "FATHERS' NIGHT

Hey, I see my cousin, Charlie Gaudette in the second row. Even then he had those dark eyebrows. Charlie looked a lot like the late Peter Lawford, MGM film star and the object of many a lady's affection.

Tuesday, April 13, 2010

1801: MARCH AND APRIL BARNT DEKLYN SELLING FARM

These old timers speak for themselves. Note the availability of a Negro slave who recovered from Small Pox. Note also the old British letter "s" which looks like an "f."

1937: Donald Benedetti

In keeping with my goal of providing "Local History With A Personal Touch," I present herewith a photo of young Don Benedetti. I suspect that Don is related to one of my regular friends and visitors, Carlo Benedetti, a vintage "Burg" resident and current proprietor of the fabled Olden Pharmacy on South Olden Avenue in Hamilton. Carlo, I hope this is a relative, and if so, it will make a worthy addition to the family photo album.

1937: HOPEWELL'S ELMER EWING

Mr. Ewing is a man after my own heart! Who says one is "washed up" after reaching 70 years of age? Age is a state of mind. Mr. Ewing's observation that we gain wisdom as we age is so very true. Had I had that wisdom back in the early 1960's when I was warned about working for a "mom and pop" organization, I would not have signed on to a career that at the time was filled with "rosy" empty promises of a great future; promises which though not done maliciously, ended up with the principals of the company retiring and passing the business on to their less experienced and immature sons. Bottom line: The business went chapter 11 within months and I retired without even getting a Timex watch. However, the Good Lord closes one door and another opens. At the ripe old age of 75, I find myself gainfully employed, happily married, and ready for the next 25 years!

1877: LUTHERAN CHURCH OF THE REDEEMER - TRENTON

This church has an incredible historical heritage dating back to the mid 1800's. Many years ago, I was invited by "B.B.Wetzel to be a guest speaker at the mens' club of the church. What a fascinating building! It was known in early 20th century years as the Trinity German Evangelical Lutheran Church, shortened later to "Trinity Lutheran."

Monday, April 12, 2010

1905: Mr. Quintin of the Quinton Avenue area

Did you know that Quinton Avenue in Trenton was named for the Quintin family who were operating a horse racing track where Villa Park is located today? One wonders why the city of Trenton replaced the "i" in Quintin's name with an "o."

1949: KUSER ANNEX PRESENTS "A CASE OF SPRINGTIME"

Those who attended their Freshman year at Kuser Annex back in the far distant 30's and 40's will remember our annual "Spring Entertainment." During my years at the Annex, Miss Jean Larzalere was the teacher who acted as the Director of the productions. That lovely young lady in the photo was one of the burning flames in my 16 year old heart back then. Yes, that's the "Madeline" I wrote about in numerous columns over the years. She was a sweet young charmer who was the object of affection for many of my buddies back then, including Lenny Sager, also in the photo.
My apologies for the photos. They were not published in "gray scale;" instead they are in a mode known as "black and white" with no in-between tones.

1937: JUNIOR 3 "PUPIL PLAYWRIGHTS"

1937: Harold "Bus" Saidt

I met Bus back in the early years when I was President of St. Anthony's Holy Name Society. I had called him and asked if he would be a guest speaker at a forthcoming meeting. Bus agreed. I was delighted. Sadly, when meeting night came, I think I recall that about 7 or 8 people attended. I was mortified. Sheepishly, I told Bus I was so disappointed at the turnout. It was announced in a prominent place in our weekly church bulletin. Bus was completely gracious. Undaunted, he went on with his presentation and those few members who attended enjoyed stories of his remarkable career. He was my personal hero during the years when he and Bill Hildenbrand announced for the Trenton Giants.

1937 ST. JOHN'S GRAMMAR SCHOOL CLASS OF 1937

The late General George Betor was a member of this class, as was Ted "Thumper" Meskill, a very long ago friend of mine back in the 1950's. There are a number of other very familiar family names: Bresnan, Drenguba, McLaughlin, etc.

2009: Obit Rita Kleindinst Semler, HHS '56

Unfortunately we must report the loss of another HHS56 Classmate. Those who wish to send condolences to Sandy Cavilli and Rita's family may do so at: 38 Baltusrol Rd., Hamilton, NJ 08690.
Jack

Rita A. (Kleindinst) Semler

Rita A. Semler HAMILTON - Rita A. Semler, 72, of Hamilton passed away on Thursday at home. Born in Trenton, Rita was a lifelong Hamilton area resident and graduate of Hamilton High School West, Class of 1956. She was employed with Trenton Trust as a bank teller, and retired in 2000. Rita served on her Class Reunion Committee, was a member of the Hamilton Senior Center, enjoyed playing cards, and vacationing in Florida during the winter. Predeceased by her parents, Frederick and Ethel (Thomas) Kleindinst, she is survived by her daughter, Diane Wysienski; her son, James Semler; her grandchildren, James, Emma and Sarah, and her longtime companion, Alessandro "Sandy" Cavilli. Family and friends may call from 5 to 8 p.m. on Wednesday at the Saul Colonial Home, 3795 Nottingham Way, Hamilton Square, NJ, with a funeral service, during this time, at 7:30 p.m. Interment services will be private. www.saulfuneralhomes.com

Sunday, April 11, 2010

1928: The Chambersburg Red Sox

Ralph Lucarella, I said it before and I'm saying it again. You are a well spring of memories. Folks have also complimented me on my memory, but you are every bit as lucid with yours. You mentioned the Chambersburg Red Sox and I immediately became fascinated that there was such a team. A bit of research in the 20's and lo and behold, another Lucarella who was their catcher. Thanks for that little bit of local sports and Chambersburg history, Ralph; as I said many times, you are the best!

Saturday, April 10, 2010

1937 LAWRENCEVILLE AND SLACKWOOD GRAMMAR SCHOOL GRADUATES


From the "CLASS PHOTOS" folder in the Hamilton Library's Digital Local History Collection, these class photos of the classes of 1937 at the Slackwood School and the Lawrenceville Public School.

1937 MAPLE SHADE SCHOOL HONOR ROLL

Many familiar old line White Horse names in the above list of students.

1937: RALPH LUCARELLA, BATTING CHAMP

Ralph Lucarella has been a regular visitor to this blog since its inception in 2005. His input is a very welcome addition to the historical material which is posted. Ralph's experiences and the many contemporaries with whom he grew up provide a very interesting look into the Hamilton-Trenton area. Did you know Ralph was also a very active and successful athlete back in his younger years? The post above shows that he was also quite able to hold his own at bat with a .500 batting average in 7 games played in the City Twilight Baseball League. I am currently looking through the 1930's newspapers, Ralph, and I will be sure to post any other material I find; all in keeping with my pledge to bring our visitors "local history with a personal touch."

Friday, April 09, 2010

1912: JAMES RUSLING TELLS OF HIS MOVE TO TRENTON

From the "TRENTON-DEVELOPMENT OF" FOLDER, this fascinating and informative article details the move from the Rusling home in Cherryville in Hunterdon County to Trenton with the stops along the way. His description of the area at the time is noteworthy history.

1870: FIRE AT THE RUSLING FARM

Before it was today's Broad Street Park, it was Ruslingville. The article tells how the Trenton Fire Department had to respond to the fire long before there was a Rusling Hose Fire Company.
For more in depth history of Broad Street Park,
click on Broad Street Park Historian Jim Colello's link.

THE CHAMBERSBURG PAGE

Chambersburg is one of my favorite subjects as I peruse the pages of the Trenton Times, Daily State Gazette, and Daily True American in my extensive 100 year collection of Trenton newspapers. The masthead above was used at various times back in the teens as the Trenton Evening Times provided in-depth coverage of nearly every community in its circulation area.

1917: THE CHAMBERSBURG PAGE IN THE TIMES

Early Chambersburg is one of my very favorite subjects in my personal collection. From the years when the area was open fields with orchards and cornfields, the German immigration to that area and the founding of Fr. Ludwig's Immaculate Conception Parish to Father Pozzi's St. Joachim Church and the historic years of the Italian influence, Chambersburg, and Mill Hill in South Trenton have been of particular interest to me. Years from now, future scholars and those interested in our local history will find these pages of significant interest.