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Sunday, February 28, 2010

1900; ILLEGAL ARMS ON A SUNDAY IN DEUTZVILLE

Constables Caeser, Shockley and Frawley were all named in many police related matters in Hamilton some 100 years ago. Here, Mr. Frawley doggedly trails a Deutzville resident who violated the Hamilton ordinance against firearms on the Sunday.

1871: Horace Greeley Visits Hamilton Square

"Go west, young man!" Well in this instance Mr. Horace Greeley came east and visited our own Hamilton Square to bolster the temperance movement which was trying to make Hamilton Square a dry town. Local history is filled with stories of the fight to keep liquor out of the rural town. The photo of Mr. Greeley was inserted along side of the article. There were no photos in the newspaper in 1871.

1861: SEVEN COMPANYS AT CAMP OLDEN

I have been searching for the earliest reference to Camp Olden in order to find information on the construction and preparation of the land. This is among the earliest I found as I scanned the newspapers from the Spring season of 1861.

1861: CAMP OLDEN ALREADY LAID OUT

"Lines are easier made with pens than with type-we are unable to publish it.." That extract relates to the engraving of the layout of Camp Olden; a search I have been involved with for over 20 years. Someone said there was a map in someone's possession, but that is only hearsay. I will continue the search, but I feel it may be futile. Newspaper graphic technology during that era was basically reserved for repeat advertising.

1849: THE VILLAGE OF HAMILTON SQUARE IS IMPROVING

As can be seen in the article above, the little farming village of Hamilton Square is growing, with many nice building lots available at $400 per acre. How I would love to see a view of the Square as it looked in the early part of the 19th century!

Saturday, February 27, 2010

2010: GRAND OPENING OF "HAMSTAT" TOMORROW; YOU'RE INVITED FOR A "SNEAK PEAK!"

Imagine how great it would be if you could call Hewlett Packard, Verizon, or any of the many huge corporations and speak with a real live person without getting that dreaded "All of our representatives are busy. Your call is very important to us. Please stay on the line for the next available representative,...!" The hi-tech revolution has changed the way we communicate, and with that change came the absence of "one on one" conversation with "voice mail," "e-mail," "texting," and usually lengthy waiting for a person to answer your call. Gone are the days of "Ma Bell," when one could make a call and have it answered IMMEDIATELY with a real live person. Take heart, Hamilton, those days have come back to "America's Favorite Hometown!" Check out the above press release from Mayor John Bencivengo and pay a visit to the Hamstat headquarters tomorrow. You can check out the system which has proved successful in New York City, Baltimore and other innovative cities that were not intimidated by new and more efficient communication concepts.. I hope I'll see you there.

1910: GLOBAL WARMING IN EARLY HAMILTON OR GLOBAL COOLING?

There has been much talk about of global warming of late. The above article tells of the guys at Hamilton Square back in 1910, sitting around a wood burning stove in the general store, and talking about the weather. Harsh winters indeed. However, even though harsh winters were often cited in the past, so too were those winters when it was unusually unseasonably warm and less severe. Have faith: Mother nature has a way of balancing her seasons; she's been doing it since we read in the book of Genesis, "In the beginning....".

1891: RUDOLPH KUSER OBIT

The graphic following this tells of the auction for the Benjamin Lord farm on Pond Run Road (Kuser Road) back in 1855, 6 years prior to the arrival of Rudolph Kuser to the area in 1861 perhaps Kuser purchased the farm as advertised in the article below while still a resident of Newark; a puzzle yet to be solved.

1855: THE BENJAMIN LORD FARM

I had been told by the late Fritz Kuser that Rosalie and Rudolph Kuser purchased their Kuser Road farm (Today's Homestead) back in March, 1888. This graphic indicates the sale of the property by the Lord family following Benjamin Lord's death in 1855. Perhaps there was a former landowner prior to the Kuser acquisition of the property. If so, It may explain the reason for the gap between the time the farm was up for auction in 1855, until the Rudolph and Rosalie Kuser purchased it in March, 1888. Rudolph Kuser came from Newark to Hamilton Township in 1861.

1903: BERNADINE AVENUE IN HOMEDELL

I often wondered where the name came from. Woolsey, Hutchinson and other Homedell streets are named for local folks who were a part of Hamilton's Homedell Section. So too was Father Bernadine Ludwig of Immaculate Conception Parish in Chambersburg when it was known as Our Lady of Lourdes. The cemetery of the same name is in Homedell.

1911: HOW DOGTOWN GOT ITS NAME

Old timers know of the area in the general area of the old Clay Pits, today's Hamilton Library and Hamilton Police buildings and back to what the area we know of today as "The Morton Tract" on Kuser Road and White Horse-Mercerville Road. It is important to remember that this area, along with most of Hamilton Township was a very rural area with the surrounding villages of Hamilton Square, Sandtown, Sand Hills, White Horse, Broad Street Park, Homedell, and Bromley encircling farms, forests, and open fields.

Friday, February 26, 2010

1919; MERCER RUBBER CO.: THE SAYEN CONNECTION

Most folks associate the name "Sayen" with Sayen Gardens, the beautiful Hamilton Township park in Hamilton Square. Here's an article which shows the connection the Sayen family had with C.V. Meade's Mercer Rubber Company. Mr. Meade was the pioneer in Trenton's extensive rubber industry, having entered the industrial scene in the mid 19th century. The old Hamilton Rubber Company on Meade Street in East Trenton was one of his enterprises. More on Charles V. Meade in future posts.

1903: LIBERTY, LALOR, STANTON AND ADELINE STREETS

From the "NEIGHBORHOOD DEVELOPMENT" folder, this very interesting article on the genesis of the breaking up of the Brearly real estate holdings in South Trenton. I am building a very interesting collection of Land Associations and other real estate ventures which were instrumental in the expansion of the suburbs. Stay tuned.

2010: HHS 1960 50TH REUNION

I received a guest book entry on my blog from Eleanor Goldy Guear requesting that I post information on the 50th reunion of Hamilton High's class of 1960. I am always happy to accommodate my fellow Hornets. The little vignettes I posted show mini pics of Eleanor Guear, lower left Ann Peters, lower center Cathy Csorgo, and to the far right, a photo of Mary Ann Belardino, sister of my HHS singing partner, Lee Belardino. Ann Peters grew up on the Hartley Avenue hill, and is the sister of my brother Bud's best friend, Bill "Beb" Peters, Cathy is a loyal visitor to my blogs and has added an incredible collection of amateur radio memorabilia from her dad Steve Csorgo's years as a local amateur radio operator. Small world!

FROM DON NUGENT MARCH 2; SORRY I COULDN'T SEND THIS TO ELEANOR AS YOU REQUESTED DON, I SEEM TO HAVE LOST ELEANOR'S EMAIL ADDRESS WHEN VERIZON NUKED MY COMPLETE EMAIL CONTACT DIRECTORY. TRUSTING THAT SHE OR A CLASSMATE WILL PICK UP THIS MESSAGE:

Tom,
I see where I am "missing". Please send my email address to Eleanor Guear: dnugent2@gmail.com.Thanks Tom. Still enjoying your blog.

Don Nugent


THIS FROM ELEANOR GUEAR:
Tom - Thanks so much for the Reunion announcement! I DID NOT know that you would include pictures! I'll keep you posted on our plans
Eleanor


ALSO FROM ELEANOR TODAY, FEBRUARY 27, A COMMENT ON A TYPOGRAPHICAL ERROR WHEREIN I LISTED THE 60TH REUNION INSTEAD OF THE 50TH. CORRECTION HAS BEEN MADE. ALSO ELEANOR SAYS THAT DONALD NUGENT IS AMONG THE MISSING. DON, SEND ME AN EMAIL OR ADD A COMMENT HERE SO CLASSMATES CAN CONTACT YOU.
===================
John Wilkes wrote:
Thanks for the great blog. My wife, Pat, and buddy, college roommate, and still friend, Bob Chianese have commented, so I could not pass up the opportunity. Lalor School grad, lived on Reed Ave., family home for 70+ years. The best of times for us all in Hamilton and Trenton! My blog: www.homesteadishome.org south of Miami at gateway to the Keys.

Thank you, John. I will visit www.homesteadishome.org. I hope you return to www.glover320 often.

===========================

This From Pat Wilkes:


Pat wrote:

As a former Trentonian, it was fun checking out this website and blogs. It really brought back many happy memories especially now since we're preparing for our 50th Hamilton High School West reunion. My high school days were the best of my life.
(Thanks, Pat; my school years were also a very important part of my life.)


===================

This from Bob Chianese:

Tom:


I just hooked up with your blog from a member of our 50th reunion committee-we're meeting in Hamilton this June.
I used to have call WA2AXE and remember the Trenton Sunday morning gang on 75 meters: my ham mentors were Gat, Zol, and Steve QJO. I had a Cal call sign many years (WA6LCC) until I forgot to renew my license at the 10 year renewal! I'm studying for a new General but it's hard.
I'm a retired university English prof. and look forward to our HHS reunion this summer. My wife is from Trenton High, also class of 1960.
73, Bob

(Many thanks for visiting Glover320, Bob. I hope you return often)






2010 FEBRUARY 25 BEFORE THE SNOW ARRIVED

These Goldfinches are taking advantage of Glover hospitality as they cluster around my Niger (Thistle) filled bird feeder just outside of my dining room window. In another 30 days or so, the males will turn into a brilliant yellow and black plumage, and they will continue to bring their delightful presence to our window throughout the upcoming spring, summer and fall season.

Thursday, February 25, 2010

2010: WELL DONE, MAYOR BENCIVENGO, COUNCIL, AND TOWN FATHERS!

"Hamilton Township appears to be on sound financial footing and our expectations are that it will remain so into the future."

The above is just a portion of the glowing report which is extracted from Standard and Poors regarding Hamilton Township's remarkable bounce back from a very ominous financial deficit. Politics aside, every Hamiltonian should be thankful for the efforts of Mayor Bencivengo and the Council, and all associated with this financial resuscitation for bringing us back to fiscal sanity.

1913: MORE ON THE ORIIGIN OF TRENTON STREET NAMES

I have been researching the origin of the streets in Hamilton with special emphasis on my Kuser Farm neighborhood. Atkins, Watson, Ellwood, Camp, have all been connected to Colonial Gardens which was the general area of the location of Camp Olden, Hamilton's Civil War camp location. Here's still another graphic regarding the origin of Trenton's streets which will accompany another which was recently posted. (Use the "SEARCH BLOG" feature and enter the key words STREET NAMES and you will find the other article.)

1883: CHAMBERSBURG AS FEW TODAY WOULD RECOGNIZE IT

In the latter part of the 19th century, the Trenton area began expanding to what we know of today as the suburbs. Can you imagine the tightly populated Chambersburg as being cornfields, orchards, and farms? It is difficult to imagine. However, articles such as the above graphic, give a lucid picture of the outlying areas of the city.A crab apple orchard at Hamilton and Chestnut avenues; how intriguing!
Blogger SJBill said...

I think I recognize two names on the list of developers:

The Hartmann residing at Landing and Center St is likely related to the Hartmann Funeral Home, which is just down the block a bit between Cass and Landing.

I'll bet the Charles Haggerty is the one that resided on Dye St., between S Clinton and Genesee. His name still associated with Haggerty Alley which was between both those streets.

When I was a little kid, I remember discussing the development of the Burg with some old timers that remembered the borough as an agrarian area a little further away from the Old Burg. The Roebling factory changed everything.

Wednesday, February 24, 2010

TO ACCESS THE "ARCHIVES" MORE CONVENIENTLY

I have moved the "ARCHIVES" up to the top of this blog and removed the "INDEX" feature which is nearly impossible to maintain at this time. The "SEARCH BLOG" feature at the top left of the home page is much easier to activate and locate specific subjects.
(Type in a key word and click on the magnifying glass)

With the former archives listing way down at the bottom of the home page, many newcomers to this site didn't realize that there are HUNDREDS of other earlier entries on this blog, dating back to November, 2005, all available by a simple click on a given month.


THANKS FOR VISITING; I HOPE YOU RETURN OFTEN.

1938: EWING'S LANNING SCHOOL

Reading through this list of students at Lanning magically took me back to 1952 when I began working at what would become a dead end job. I see two of my fellow workers at the old Trenton Bearing Company on No. Olden Avenue in the list: The late Bill Kuestner, and a fellow I still see to this day at Central Baptist Church in Ewing, George Disbrow. There are so many other familiar names: Hollis Wyks, Cal Steepy, and many other old line Ewing natives.

2010: PERPETUAL HONOR AND HOMAGE

This is one of 3 photos sent to me by my friend, Bud Foley, who received it from one of his Indiana Navy shipmates. I told Bud when I viewed those photos, I experienced those fabled goosebumps. I took the liberty of adding the post office slogan to the bottom of the photo; never was it more true.

1938: PLANNING A DANCE FOR IMMACULATE CONCEPTION BOYS' HIGH SCHOOL

Herewith a photo of the movers and shakers involved with a dance for the ICHS boys at the Greenacres Country Club back in the Spring of 1938. I see the late Lillian Pimlott Newbanks, former Trenton teacher who went on to become a parishioner at St. Anthony parish in the 80's and 90's. She was a friend of St. St. Anthony Associate Pastor, Father Francis McGrath.

Ralph Lucarella has left a new comment on your post "1938: PLANNING A DANCE FOR IMMACULATE CONCEPTION B...":

Hi Tom: That is a nice photo of my friend Art Holland. We were teamates on the Southards baseball team at that time. His brother Joe, also in the photo, was a County Freeholder and of course Art became one of the better mayors for the city of Trenton. They were living on Tyler Street at that time and joined other Chambersburg people in sharing political problems of the area. Best regarda

2010: ROBINS AND FORSYTHIA: HARBINGERS OF SPRING

I am entering my 77th spring season in this wonderful township of Hamilton. As each year piles on with increased rapidity, along comes spring and God's ethereal gift. Even though we are still facing still another snowy weekend, I take comfort in the Crocus, Daffodils, and Tulip bulbs that have already sent their leaves through the ground, ready to display God's annual handiwork to his flock.

Tuesday, February 23, 2010

1990'S: CABLEVISON CAME, LOCAL PROGRAMMING WENT!

I remember it well. Ronnie Stewart was play by play for ALL local high school sports and Tom Glover was fulfilling the local cable promise of local access programming. Both programs were very well received. Then, along came Ms. Amy Goldberg, then Program Director at Cablevision who invited me to lunch and at that lunch telling me that they really liked the local access programs which TKR was providing and that Cablevision would be carrying on the tradition. That was a luncheon that I recall vividly. Then, out of the blue, Cablevision took over with their "TV That's Close to Home," and we get to watch an interview with the Mayor of Wall Township, the councilman from Matawan, a visit to an Ocean County High School, and other "TV That's Close to Cablevision's Home." programs. Going from small to large in cable providers resulted corporate bureaucrats who wanted less expensive logistics than traveling all the way from Wall Township in Monmouth County to Hamilton, New Jersey for truly local programming. Instead of the annual St. Patrick's Day parade which the old TKR covered, let's slip in the St. Patrick's Day Parade from Belmar; much cheaper to drive 10 miles then all the way to Hamilton.

1911: THE SEARCH FOR ANDERSON FARM

The following post, along with this post tells of the fire the boys at the Hamilton Volunteer Fire company fought on the land owned by the Anderson family. Absent any maps of the area that date back past 1935, I must depend on news accounts such as this to establish historic facts; in this case, referring to the fire on Greenwood Avenue near Norway on the Charles Anderson Farm. To those not familiar with that area, it ultimately became a part of today's Bromley section.

1906: HAMILTON'S HISTORIC ANDERSON FAMILY FARM (BROMLEY)


I am researching the evolution of the neighborhoods in Hamilton Township and in that research I am coming up with very interesting material which points to the true rural character that was once the location of huge farms. Right now I am looking for a very elusive subject: The Anderson Farm, which goes back to Revolutionary War years. I have found that the Anderson Farm homestead was located in the area of today's Atlantic and Greenwood Avenueand that the Anderson Farm extended all the way to Greenwood Cemetery; mute testimony to the size of these local farms. 

vicki said...
I hope you can come up with more information please! This was my Great Grandparents Family. There must be old maps in the survey office maybe?
Monday, April 11, 2011

Delete

*      vicki said...decendants?

*      1860 United States Federal Census about James Anderson
Name: James Anderson ge in 1860: 62
Birth Year: about 1798
Birthplace: New Jersey
Home in 1860: Hamilton, Mercer, New Jersey
Gender: Male
Post Office: Trenton
Household Members:
James Anderson 62
Thirza Anderson 55
Hezekiah A Anderson 35
Matilda Anderson 33
Adaline A Anderson 31
Mary J Anderson 29
Caroline Anderson 26
Aaron Anderson 24
Ellen A Anderson 22
Charles C Anderson 20
George A Anderson 19
Thirza Anderson 17
Louisa R Anderson 13
Phebe C Allen sister of Thirza 52
There were more Anderson's in Hamilton also: Original Farm Sold in 1874 eventually to Greenwood Cemetery Assn.


Hi Vicki: Many thanks for the interesting addition to the Anderson family. My home lies within a city block of where the original Anderson homestead originally stood in the area of Woodlawn Avenue. My research indicates that the farm extended all the way from just over the Trenton border, (today's North and South Logan Avenue) all the way to Greenwood Cemetery; a huge plot of land. As to a map, if you find one, I would love to know about it. I have been searching for years.Thanks for visiting my blog. I hope you return often. If I find additional information on the Andersons, I will post it.

Tom Glover

1907: JOSEPH H. WEST, TOWNSHIP AND COUNTY HISTORIAN

The historic writings of Joseph H. West are a part of the digital collection here at the Hamilton Township Public Library's Local History Collection. Mr. West has written many columns which brought interesting history to the area during the early part of the 20th century. Indeed, he is the predecessor to John Cleary, Alma Lawson and Harry Podmore. I will be posting many of these news articles which I dare say have been buried deep within the files of various area library microfilm collections. Note that the graphics here are without those vertical streaks that are on most microfilm due to sliding under the lens as pages are fast forwarded and reversed. As usual, I ask your indulgence on the poor quality of the photo of Mr. West, but offset printing technology was in the very earliest stages.

Monday, February 22, 2010

1940: LARRY MANGINE CHALLENGES FRED COCHRANE

There have been a number of requests from the older generation for files relating to various local sports figures, ie Cobine, Williams, etc.) Each time I find a specific photo article which will reproduce in a clear graphic, I will be sure to include it. Here's "Chambersburg Leather Pusher" Larry Mangine, all set to go toe to toe with Freddie Cochrane.
IF EVER THERE WAS TRUTH IN THAT OLD SAYING, "BEEN THERE-DONE THAT," IT REALLY APPLIES TO MR. RALPH LUCARELLA, WHOSE VINTAGE EXPERIENCE AND HIS INCREDIBLE MEMORY IS ADDING SO MUCH TO THIS BLOG. HERE'S ANOTHER OF RALPH'S MEMORIES FROM THE PAST:
Blogger Ralph Lucarella said...

Well Tom, I got to know Larry Mangine in the late 30s. We worked along with others at the 112th Field Artillery in Lawrenceville. It was called the NYA project. We worked 8 days a month for $18 and it was some help in those depression years. A group of guys from the Burg, including Larry and I, did a lot of physical work that kept us in good shape. We spoke a lot about fighting and he mentioned how his mother feared everytime he got into the ring. I think that was a big factor in his efforts to make prize fighting a carear. I will say you would not want to know a nicer man than Larry Mangine. Best regards.

1940: JAMES MOSES SCHOOL, VILLA PARK

The Kindergarten class, or as we Hamiltonians called it, "Reception Grade" is illustrated in the photo above. I see little Paul Ashmore, Hamilton High Class of 1952 in there, and is that former Senator Gerald Stockman?

1 Comment

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Anonymous rayfromvillapark said...

Tom, When we moved to Villa Park in 1945, the old Moses school sat diagonally behind our house on the other side of the alley.
The school had been abandoned and was boarded up with some debris strewn about the property. I do remember, however, that we were able to play baseball on the property.
A few years later the school was knocked down and 3 or 4 houses were built on the property.
Does anyone know when the school opened and when it closed? Also, is there any documentation when the building was torn down? I think it was the early 1950s? Rayfromvillapark

RAY:
IF YOU GO TO THE "SEARCH BLOG" LINK IN THE UPPER LEFT OF THIS BLOG YOU WILL FIND THE GENESIS OF THE JAMES MOSES SCHOOL. Type in Moses School and you will find many entries, along with an 1890's architect's rendering of the school.

1992: THE HAMILTON TOWNSHIP HISTORICAL SOCIETY

The above feature article from the June 26, 1992 edition of the Hamilton Observer tells the story of the Hamilton Historical Society. It is a concise sketch of the aims of the society in their efforts to perpetuate the historic heritage of the John Abbott II House on Kuser Road adjacent to the entrance to Veterans' Park. My dear friend and colleague, Dr. James Federici is currently the President.

The society meets at the Hamilton Township Public Library Lower Level Meeting Room on the first Monday of the month at 7:00 P.M. with the following exceptions:
  • No meetings during the months of January and February.
  • The December meeting is a Wassail Party Open House from 2 to 4 P.M. at the John Abbott II House. A truly festive and very enjoyable Christmas event.
  • The June meeting is held on the lawn of the John Abbott II house on Kuser Road, weather permitting. If inclement weather, the meeting reverts to the Hamilton Township Public Library meeting room.
THE UPCOMING MARCH 1, 2010 MEETING WILL FEATURE HISTORICAL SOCIETY MEMBER MRS. GEORGIANNA SMITH WITH:
"THE STORY OF THE ORPHAN TRAIN RIDERS"

Support your local historical society!
Membership in the Society is as follows:
Single: $10.00 annually
Family: $15.00 annually
Checks made payable to:
Historical Society of Hamilton Township,
P.O. Box 1776,
Hamilton, NJ 08620


1992: THE LATE BOB SIMPKINS: THE ORIGINAL HAMILTON HISTORIAN

"Though you travel the world over in search of the beautiful,
You must carry it with you or you find it not."
Ralph Waldo Emerson

This article by my former journalistic colleague Echo Fling is among the very best of the many columns written on the agricultural heritage of Hamilton township. It has been re-formatted in order to fit on the computer monitor. Ms Fling chose the one man who in my estimation was the real "Hamilton Historian," the late, Robert Simpkins. Bob had a fierce love of Hamilton, and the many stories he told me of his early years as a farmer at the Simpkins Brothers Dairy Farm on Yardville-Hamilton Square Road have all been stored in my mental memory bank. Before he passed on to be with the Lord at age 102, it was my privilege to take Bob to and from our monthly Hamilton Township Historical Society meetings. I marveled at the stories he told, and feeling with which he told them. He was a splendid example of a very humble but knowledgeable man. The interview above is an incredibly concise thumbnail sketch of the rural Hamilton of old.

Saturday, February 20, 2010

1908: KLOCKNER SCHOOL: IN THE BEGINNING

It was completed in 1909 but the preliminary legal proceedings was accomplished in 1908. Above is a scan of the actual Ballot which was part of the process. Would you believe that these incredibly historic documents were in a storage area that was destined to be destroyed?

1935: LAWRENCEVILLE PUBLIC SCHOOLS CLASS OF '35

Blogger Ralph Lucarella said...

Hi Tom; I noticed the name of Walt Krichling in that group of graduates. I believe he went on to play football with the University of Penn. If I remember correctly, he was outstanding in high school and college. That was just about the time I was going to Trenton High. Best regards.

SJBill has left a new comment on your post "1935: LAWRENCEVILLE PUBLIC SCHOOLS CLASS OF '35":

Coach Walt Krichling was on the THS faculty in the 60s, and on the football staff with Coach Pat Clemons and Coach Bob Callahan

Friday, February 19, 2010

1935: WHEN THE TRENTON FIRE DEPARTMENT WAS ALL VOLUNTEER

I ask your indulgence for the poor quality of the photo in the graphic. In computing, there is a problem that sometimes arises in the process of "screening"an offset photo such as that above. In the case above, no amount of tweaking could remove that background "moire" which give the appearance of a fabric. It is due to the incompatibility of the number of dots per inch on a news photo as relates to the number of dots per inch scanned. I failed to find a happy medium. The hand drawn pumper in the photo was used by one of the Trenton volunteer fire companies prior to their 1892 changeover to a paid fire department.

1935: THE TRENTON FREEWAY AS IT MIGHT HAVE BEEN

I was only 2 years old when this event from the "STREETS-ROADS-HIGHWAYS" folder took place: The city of Trenton was in the early stages of planning the construction of a highway through the city of Trenton where the canal had flowed for years. We have come to know that highway as the "Trenton Freeway." Prior to the actual construction of the freeway, there was a suggestion that the freeway pass across East State Street and the Canal at a railroad crossing. As we all know, the road was tunneled under E. State Street and other cross streets. Notice the railroad crossing gates which were in place during the 1930's.

ONCE AGAIN, FROM ONE OF OUR MOST VALUABLE VISITORS, RALPH LUCARELLA, THIS INSIGHTFUL COMMENT ON THE GRAPHIC ABOVE.
Ralph is a senior who is a local treasure with memories that he has of the era of the 30's and upward.
Ralph: Your comments add valuable first person experiences and are very much appreciated.
Blogger Ralph Lucarella said...

Hi Tom: That's a good shot of the Post Office, where my brother and I worked until 1955 when we left to build the Hamilton Bowling Lanes. I can recall the time the freeway was built and also the canal that ran through there. They were great times for the city and the beginning of big changes in routes through out Trenton. I remember eating breakfast in the dinner across the street from the Post Office for 15 years,

Friday, February 19, 2010

1935: JACKIE HAMILTON, HHS '52 IS ONE YEAR OLD

How I remember this very pretty blonde teenager with the singing voice of an angel during my years at Hamilton High. Jackie was a sweet girl with a wonderful personality. I remember her well.

1935: DEDICATION OF THE EWING MUNICIPAL BUILDING

I remember Wes Armstrong from my years working at the Trenton Bearing Company on North Olden Avenue (Currently the Carriage Cleaner building.) Wes was in business as the Armstrong Industrial Supply Company. (Wow, am I getting old, or what?)

1973: COLONIAL FIRE CO.: GOODBYE LIBERTY STREET, HELLO KUSER ROAD

How appropriate that the new Colonial Fire house would be located on the very plot of land that "Big John" Lenhardt trod from the time of his birth up to his passing. He passed on his fire fighting to his family, all of whom are Colonial Fire Company legends. My buddy Jess Anderson was a volunteer back in the 1940's. He and I always referred to John Lenhardt as "Big John;" and big he was, physically and professionally. He was perhaps the most dedicated volunteer fireman in the history of Colonial. He was also a family friend whose sweet corn was a delight. Each week, John would bring his delicious, fresh-picked sweet corn to our neighbors in the Colonial neighborhood. The article tells of the new fire house. I note the presence of Bob Hoyer, who is a fellow parishioner of mine at Trenton's Sacred Heart Parish.

1847: TEACHER WANTED FOR EWING'S BIRMINGHAM SCHOOL HOUSE

I leave it to any historian from Ewing Township to enlighten us on the location of the "Birmingham Union School." I am currently searching for information on those legendary one room school houses which became part of the local (and national) scene in the 1840's.

Thursday, February 18, 2010

1935: PARKWAY SCHOOL, EWING NJ

Here's the students who attained perfect attendance at the Parkway School in Ewing. Any familiar names in there?

1931: THE COLLEGE OF NEW JERSERY AKA TRENTON STATE TEACHERS' COLLEGE


Two years before I was born, that local institution of learning that my generation knew of as "State Teachers' College" was being built over in Ewing Township. My only contact with that august institution was way back in 1952 when I decided that I would like to attend the school and get a teaching degree majoring in history. Sadly. the $900 annual tuition plus text books was too much for the very limited Glover family budget and I had to find work to help the family add to the budget. To this day I regret that those moneys weren't available. As it turned out, I ended up spending over 40 years in in a dead end "mom and pop" job selling bearings and industrial machine parts which ultimately ended up in a "Chapter 11" bankruptcy as the two principals retired and turned the business over to their sons
.
NOTE: A VERSION OF THIS ARTICLE AND PHOTO WAS PUBLISHED BACK IN JULY 2007 (?). I HAVE DELETED THAT GRAPHIC, RE-FORMATTED IT, AND AM RE-POSTING IT HERE. I HAVE ALSO COPIED AND PASTED TOM REED'S ADDED INFO ON THE OLD NORMAL SCHOOL WHICH WAS A COMMENT ON THE ORIGINAL JULY POST..

TOM WROTE:

For a few years on Clinton Ave when it was known as the Normal School and before the new Grant School was built, the school area was one of our play areas

Tom Reed Miami FL
mimareed@aol.com

 

1940: "Personally my dear, I don't give a damn."

Here is a set of ticket stubs which were in the little envelope below which was probably a set of complimentary tickets to the premier showing of one of the greatest motion picture classics of all time.