Search This Blog

Saturday, July 24, 2010

1939: WHEN GREENWOOD AVENUE WAS A THROUGH STREET

Back in the 1940's when the Trenton Freeway was being constructed, Greenwood Avenue was dead ended at South Clinton on the east, and the Clay Street area in the west.
Attention all you folks who are Mill Hill residents, historians, or visitors to that beautiful historic area: Check out my current Mill Hill column in today's "Sentimental Journey" column. Click on the link below. It will only be available for a limited 2 weeks or so.

http://www.nj.com/columns/times/index.ssf?/base/columns-0/127995039684070.xml&coll=5
Blogger SJBill said...

The long red brick building on the left is still present. We had a firebox like that on our corner by Bodnar's Service Station. Everyting on the right is long gone. Folks in these properties must have been kept up all night during the Summer. They were up close to the Pennsy Main Line, and they blew whistles and horns all the time when passing through town.

It's amazing how many places were "on hard times" back then, but we didn't know any better. My family was not yet infected with prosperity, even in the early '50s.

I remember when S. Clinton was dug up like that. Mostly they were getting rid of the old cobblestones or trolley track remnants, and laying new pipe for water and sewers.

4 comments:

SJBill said...

The long red brick building on the left is still present. We had a firebox like that on our corner by Bodnar's Service Station. Everyting on the right is long gone. Folks in these properties must have been kept up all night during the Summer. They were up close to the Pennsy Main Line, and they blew whistles and horns all the time when passing through town.

It's amazing how many places were "on hard times" back then, but we didn't know any better. My family was not yet infected with prosperity, even in the early '50s.

I remember when S. Clinton was dug up like that. Mostly they were getting rid of the old cobblestones or trolley track remnants, and laying new pipe for water and sewers.

Anonymous said...

Anything close to the Pennsy main line you lived and breathed by which way the wind blew. My early memories are of Mom in constant motion scrubbing soot or occasionally you would hear "Dagnabbit, I just hung the wash and the wind changed" everything would be blackened if you let your guard down.

Skip

Noel said...

Seeing the Greenwood Ave construction brought back memories of the area. I lived on Clay Street and walked the area before the freeway was built. I remember crossing the old wooden deck train bridge and being hit with the smoke and steam of the engines passing below. One time was enough!
Walked Greenwood Ave and the bridge to THS many times.
Noel Goeke

Mike Kuzma said...

As a kid growing up in South Trenton, and going to Sacred Heart Church across Broad street from this photo, I remember the area well. As a matter of fact we Kuzma's gathered at Sacred Heart last month to bury our brother in law; John Zuccarelli. I took time walking into the church to look up at the "Building on the right" in the photo. This is the old "Light Furniture Store", where famous holywood actress Judith Light grew up in the family business" Judy starred with Tony Danza in "Whose the boss", and is currently in "Law and Order SUV as the Judge.
The writer was incorrect, there was a gas station on the opposite corner, and behind it along Greenwood Ave., was a row of frame houses, and where Jackson Street crossed over Greenwood was Bill Benz's garage.
This was the way it was in the early 1960's, when as a City of Trenton planner, I came up with the idea of Rehabilitation, rather than demolition. Hence I was charged with putting the original Mercer-Jackson (Now Mill Hill) project together, and was the first Project Manager.

Best Wishes

Mike Kuzma