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Thursday, April 30, 2009

1945: 44th INFANTRY BOYS RETURN TO CENTRAL JERSEY


I would bet that the hundreds of visitors to this site will see at least one name with which they are familiar. I note that Captain Ralph Abel, one of our Physical Education teachers at Hamilton West was among the first in the extensive list of World War II heroes who came back home to Trenton, Hamilton and central Jersey, many to be "mustered out."

Wednesday, April 29, 2009

1938: HURLEY TOBIN DELIVERY FLEET


Broad Street Park Historian Jim Colello stopped into my office this morning, and as usual, we had an incredibly interesting visit. Jim brought me 3 exquisite photos of the Hurley Tobin automobile fleet. I am posting one of the 3, and will be posting the others as time permits. Jim also donated the tickets to midnight Mass at Immaculate Conception Church which were posted earlier today. Thanks, Jim.

2009: DON'T MISS THE KUSER CENTENNIAL DINNER!


I will be keeping this form near the top of my website posts for the next few weeks. If you haven't already done so, right click on the reservation form, choose "Save Image As," save it to your hard drive, print it out and mail it.

1960: KUSER SCHOOL CLASS OF '60

With this being the centennial year of the founding of Hamilton Township's legendary Kuser School, I have been working feverishly to digitize as much of the sizeable files I have been collecting over the years. If you were a kuser alumnus and haven't yet sent in your reservations for the June dinner dance, page down to the reservation form, download it, print it, and get your reservation made.

1945: Hamilton Square M.E. Young People Insititute

1940'S IMMACULATE CONCEPTION MASS TICKETS


Most of the "High Holy Days" surrounding Christmas and Easter are "SRO," Standing Room Only. Those tickets would probably present a problem to that segment of the population who attend Mass once or twice a year.

Tuesday, April 28, 2009

1945: MY BUDDY LOU DIMATTIA WAY BACK WHEN


For a few years back in the 1980's Lou was the unofficial gardener at Monsignor McCorriston's somewhat disorderly yard. Lou and I go back a goodly number of years as parishioners at St. Anthony parish in Hamilton. When I left St. Anthony in the 80's, I thought I had said farewell to an old friend. However, Lou is an accomplished dancer, and didn't he come to a number of my Kuser Farm Gazebo Sunday summer programs. It was a pleasure to renew old acquaintances. And Lou, if a relative is reading this, I ask them to let you know that my son Tom and I will once again be bringing the music of the golden years to Kuser Farm Park this summer. This time we will be alternating between 3 and 5, and 6 and 8 PM Sunday programs.

Monday, April 27, 2009

1993: DELICIOUS EATERIES: READ THE LOWER GRAPHIC FIRST


See the note from Mike Kuzma regarding the "55 gallon drum" I described in error. Thanks for the correction, Mike, I never was a grilling and barbecue expert.


Above are two articles I wrote a number of years ago; read the lower one first in order to maintain the proper continuation. The articles recall many, but not all of the places we took our dates, or in the case of Del Rio, where went after dropping off our dates and meeting at Del Rio for a burger and fries taking our at the Marble round table which Carl DeAngelo reserved for "The Knights of the Round Table." Here's a mini-glimpse at "Dirty Bill's," over near the bridge at Yardley. And Mack, you asked about Dirty Bill's being a breakfast place. I don't think I can verify that. All I remember was his "stand" was right along the road from Morrisville to Yardley in a room that was apparently a sun porch at some time. As I recall, he cooked on a grill which was fashioned out of a 55 gallon drum cut in half vertically, and laid horizontally with a grill on top. I don't know whether he served breakfast, but I don't think he did....at least when we were regulars there. His hot dogs were incredibly tasty....talk about "betcha can't eat just one!"

A CORRECTION FROM MIKE KUZMA:
It was not a 55 gallon drum cut in half on which "Filthy William" did his thing. It was a large cast iron cauldron on which he grilled. Since I had a few similar type cauldrons, I remember it vividly.Many a day I stood by as he grilled, and put the "Works" on the dog. This included his wife's homemade relish, and that thin sliver of pickle.

Mike Kuzma
Newport News VA.

2009: MORE WEB BLOGS OF LOCAL INTEREST



From: thomglo@verizon.net
To: zippyz53@hotmail.com
Subject: Thanks, Joey!
Date: Mon, 27 Apr 2009 15:20:22 -0400

Hey Joey:

Thanks for the email. I have added your site to my www.glover320.blogspot.com . You have interesting stories to tell. Remember, when we're all on the other side of the dirt, there will be descendents of ours who will be very interested in the "Five W's: Who? What? When" Where" and Why?" In my generation it was Del Rio, Dirty Bill's, Greenwood Dairies, Millside Farms, Betty and Bill's, etc. You and Mike McNicoll, Gary Lippincott from Groveville and others from a younger generation have very interesting stories to tell, and it's nice to see that you guys are among those who share your experiences of growing up in the greatest area in the U.S.A.

Tom Glover

===============================================

Thank you Tom. I love the stories, and memories we all share with each other. I look back and those were the good old days and it's great to write about those experiences to share with other.
Always,

Joe


1945: TRENTON CATHOLIC BASEBALL CHAMPIONS

The young fellow in the bottom row, second from right is former Trentonian Editor, Emil Slaboda. Other familiar sports guys from that era included Warwick and Giedlin.

Saturday, April 25, 2009

2009 : HAMILTON HIGH WEST'S "CLASS OF '89 NIGHT" AT RED ROBIN MAY 13

Attention HHS '89: Kirk Corless has sent me the following email announcing a

2009 : HHS '89 NIGHT AT RED ROBIN MAY 13

1989: HHS CLASS OF '89 NIGHT MAY 13, 2009

Mr Glover,

I want to let you know that the Class of '89 Reunion Committee is holding a HHW Class of '89 Night at Red Robin on May 13th from 5-8 pm at Hamilton Marketplace. For information, go to the hhwclassof89.com website, click on Fundraisers, then click on the Red Robin logo, a page will open for the flyer to print out and then go to the restaurant to be given to the server and the Class of '89 will get 15% of the proceeds from that night.



Thanks again for your support!

Kirk

1952: LOUISE BAIRD'S HAMILTON HIGH CHOIR

Some of these singers were in my years as a member of the HHS choir. Through the years, Hamilton High's vocal music accomplishments are legendary. During WWII, the choir sang at numerous events for the soldiers at Fort Dix. Louise Baird had a scrapbook filled with warm letters of appreciation from those who were exposed to our music. Today, Ms. Sue Proulx keeps the tradition of musical excellence as the vocal music director at "West."

1952: LOUISE BAIRD'S HAMILTON HIGH CHOIR

Some of these singers were in my years as a member of the HHS choir. Through the years, Hamilton High's vocal music accomplishments are legendary. During WWII, the choir sang at numerous events for the soldiers at Fort Dix. Louise Baird had a scrapbook filled with warm letters of appreciation from those who were exposed to our music. Today, Ms. Sue Proulx keeps the tradition of musical excellence as the vocal music director at "West."

1987: Steinert Straight "A" Students

I tried so hard! All through my Kuser School years from "Reception" grade in Miss Kelley's class to "7-1," I made the honor roll almost every marking period, but never straight "A's." To me, that is an incredible accomplishment. Eighth grade was my downfall. It was there that I was paying more attention to the opposite sex than to my studies, and it was down hill from there. But not those straight "A" kids; Elaine Globus, Charlotte Wilson, Madeline Bencivengo, Marty Bisbee, Eleanor and Barbara Cohen, and too many others to list here, went right through high school and grammar school with those honors. And don't you know, Thomas Lee Glover, 11th grade student in John ("Jake") Owens' history class, received lowly "C's" in History in two marking periods. I'm a "late bloomer."

1987: Seniors Paraan and Spriggs Receive Impressive Awards

Years from now, assuming this website or any vestiges thereof exist, parents, grandparents, and future Nottingham class of '87 alumni will find this somewhat obscure graphic of value. That's what this website is all about! Belated congratulations, Shayne and Johannes!

1987: FROM MY "HAMILTON SCRAPBOOK"

All us red blooded and virile males were in love with Daisy Mae! She was that gorgeous blond seen in the above cartoon from America's magnificent comic strip past. As a boy, I remember sitting on the dining room floor, under our big "Motorola" floor model radio, and following along with "Uncle Don" on WOR radio, 710 on the A.M. dial, as he read the Sunday comics to us each Sunday.
Simple pleasures, but what a thrill it was!

1987: THOSE GREAT OLD COMIC STRIPS

I have identified the villains in the graphic above that
Dick Tracy encountered during his career as a comic strip detective.

Capp Stubbs, Smokey Stover, Prince Valiant, Smilin' Jack, and of course, Dick Tracy! The above was pasted in one of my "Nostalgia" scrapbooks, and also appeared in a "The Way We Were" column which I wrote many years ago for the late, great, Mercer Messenger. A year of so ago, on this website, I started a list of noted eateries, restaurants, hot dog stands and other long forgotten vestiges of our past. I was one of 2 other guys who was interviewed on WBCB (1490 A.M.) and we had a lively discussion remembering those great old eating places.
The list still has additional entries being added.

Let's add to my list of comics from the past. I have given you a few long-lost comics in the intro above. How many do you remember that I aren't listed? Go to the "Comments" section below and add those that you remember. (To get you started: "Henry," "Steve Canyon," c'mon, rake over that gray matter and add to the list! I'm so old I remember Milton Caniff, Russ Westover, and Ham Fisher!

Thursday, April 23, 2009

1987: EARL WILLIAMS' "DOGTOWN

When I was a boy those many years ago, the "Clay Pits" on the north west corner of Kuser Road and White Horse-Hamilton Square Road was off limits. One of my Kuser School upper classmates died there when his head struck an underground Cedar stump. The area was always fraught with mystery back then. It was a deep wooded area and filled with water that had a reddish tinge. As seen in Earl Williams' excellent story of growing up in "Dogtown," the Clay Pits were an integral part of the area. Dogtown supposedly got its name from the proliferation of wild dogs that roamed the wooded area.

Wednesday, April 22, 2009

2009:JEFF HARDIFER'S WALLY CAMPBELL WEBSITE

The recent contact I made with Ms. Janice DiNatale Reesman brought back many pleasant memories for me personally, as she furnished some great old racing memorabilia from her father Rocky DiNatale and her mother, "Luck Lucy's" years in the the sport. Some time ago, I received a heads up from Jeff Hardifer who sent me info on his very comprehensive Wally Campbell website. Jeff's site is an incredibly interesting site for those of us who remember the Trenton and Langhorne Speedways, and other local stock car race tracks. Don't miss the great racing programs Jeff has posted!
I have added "Jeff Hardifer's Wally Campbell Website" to my list of links of great interest. Well done, Jeff!

2009: DON'T MISS THE KUSER CENTENNIAL DINNER!


I will be keeping this form near the top of my website posts for the next few weeks. If you haven't already done so, right click on the reservation form, choose "Save Image As," save it to your hard drive, print it out and mail it.

2009: DON'T MISS THE KUSER CENTENNIAL DINNER!


I will be keeping this form near the top of my website posts for the next few weeks. If you haven't already done so, right click on the reservation form, choose "Save Image As," save it to your hard drive, print it out and mail it.

2009: DON'T MISS THE KUSER CENTENNIAL DINNER!


I will be keeping this form near the top of my website posts for the next few weeks. If you haven't already done so, right click on the reservation form, choose "Save Image As," save it to your hard drive, print it out and mail it.

2009: DON'T MISS THE KUSER CENTENNIAL DINNER!


I will be keeping this form near the top of my website posts for the next few weeks. If you haven't already done so, right click on the reservation form, choose "Save Image As," save it to your hard drive, print it out and mail it.

2009: DON'T MISS THE KUSER CENTENNIAL DINNER!


I will be keeping this form near the top of my website posts for the next few weeks. If you haven't already done so, right click on the reservation form, choose "Save Image As," save it to your hard drive, print it out and mail it.

2009: DON'T MISS THE KUSER CENTENNIAL DINNER!


I will be keeping this form near the top of my website posts for the next few weeks. If you haven't already done so, right click on the reservation form, choose "Save Image As," save it to your hard drive, print it out and mail it.

2009: DON'T MISS THE KUSER CENTENNIAL DINNER!


I will be keeping this form near the top of my website posts for the next few weeks. If you haven't already done so, right click on the reservation form, choose "Save Image As," save it to your hard drive, print it out and mail it.

2009: DON'T MISS THE KUSER CENTENNIAL DINNER!


I will be keeping this form near the top of my website posts for the next few weeks. If you haven't already done so, right click on the reservation form, choose "Save Image As," save it to your hard drive, print it out and mail it.

1987: HAMILTON'S "MORTON TRACT"

When the land was acquired, the idea was to establish a new "Municipal Complex" next to the existing Hamilton Township Public Library. A new Municipal Building would be constructed, and any extra space leased to commercial interests to defray the cost of the new buildings. As you see in the article, the Democrats and Republicans got into a cat fight as to how to manage the newly acquired real estate.

1987: NOTTINGHAM NORTHSTARS GIFTED STUDENTS

Tuesday, April 21, 2009

1927 PUBLIC SERVICE TRENTON SWITCHING STATION

You have probably driven by hundreds of times over the years,and wondered what that big red brick building and all those steel girders were used for. That site is quite familiar to me. I pass it on a regular basis, and always wondered the five "W's" of journalism: 'WHO, WHAT, WHEN, WHERE, AND WHY? Now we know!

1937: NORTH TRENTON - ALMS HOUSE - MCKINLEY HOSPITAL AND PADDY TOWN

Harry Podmore and John Cleary were the originators of "Trenton in Bygone Days;" an historic column which gave incredible historic insights on local history. In many cases, old time Trenton area residents provided excellent historical information. I have an ongoing digitizing project at the Hamilton Library to preserve these "Bygone Days" columns, which will result in pristine,
reproductions. Most of the hard copy of columns have been stored in scrapbooks, and over the years, the pages turned into a wrinkled mess. The Hamilton Library's digital copies will be as good and sometimes better than the originals. The above graphic is an extract from a 1937 issue of "Bygone Days." I have enhanced it by adding a mini-map of the area, and highlighted the areas discussed with the shaded areas on the map.

Monday, April 20, 2009

1964: LOU'S HOME MOVIES

Back in the mid 1940's my buddy Don Slabicki and I made frequent visits to Lou Kozak's shop to see if we could get any 16 millimeter film from Lou's cutting room floor. That visit required us to walk from Sylvan Avenue, over to Cedar Lane, up, then down Cedar Lane hill to Chambers Street, two or three blocks on Chambers Street to Lou's little corner shop at 1350 Chambers. We couldn't afford the steep price for a reel of Castle Film's "News Parade of 1944," and other very expensive 16 millimeter movies. Lou had a very extensive stock of movies, but they were meant for the guys with the professional "Kodak," Bell and Howell, and other motion picture projectors. Lou had a large table in the show room where he sold defective and outdated movies. Many of our purchases were incomplete, but we didn't really care. Don and I each had one of those basic projectors for kids. Mine was an "Excel," and Don's was a "Keystone." What memories! I can still recall running those movies in Don's basement of his 914 Sylvan Avenue home. We watched Ken Maynard, Felix the Cat, Betty Boop, and other 16 MM films long forgotten!

1963: INDEPENDENCE MALL - IN THE BEGINNING

One of my favorite local malls, where I can find a fabulous "Dollar Store" where all things are actually one dollar, a Radio Shack, where I can always find various goodies for my mp3 player, computer accessories, a police scanner, electronic cables, and all kinds of great electronic products. Now for a sobering revelation: 1963 to 2009 = 46 years.
Can you believe that this relatively "new" mall will soon
celebrate a silver jubilee?

It seems like only yesterday that Don Slabicki, Jess Anderson and I stopped in at Gravatt's frozen custard stand for a large vanilla cone!

1975: IT SEEMS LIKE ONLY YESTERDAY!

The graphic shows a few of the many "night spots"and restaurants that were around in 1974. Can you believe it has been 35 years? Don't miss the bargain prices.

2009: GARY LIPPINCOTT'S CROSSWICKS

From the "CROSSWICKS" folder in the Hamilton Library's Local History Collection, a sampling of the very interesting historical material from historic Crosswicks, the neighboring town of Groveville and Yardville.The graphic above is a cut and paste from Gary's website. Be sure to check it out at:
http://www.grovevillememories.blogspot.com

Friday, April 17, 2009

1872: BEFORE THE CALHOUN ST. BRIDGE

You talk about rustic covered bridges! This was the bridge that spanned the Delaware back in the 1800's; it also burned down in 1884, thanks to the above article submitted by Groveville Historian and colleague, Gary Lippincott who maintains an excellent site dedicated to Groveville and Crosswicks area history, memorabilia, and ephemera.

(www.grovevillememories.blogspot.com)

Many thanks for that article Gary, you're the best!

1947: Rocky DiNatale's "Motorette"

These little blue 3 wheeled scooters were a common site on our neighborhood streets back in post war Hamilton. "Chick" DiNatale gave me my first and only ride in one of those little gems one afternoon as I stood in front of my Hartley Avenue home. He recognized me as one of the kids who hung around Rocky's, fascinated by the stock cars being modified, repaired, and created.

1947: ROCKY DINATALE: STOCK CAR RACING LEGEND


Thanks to Ms. Jan DiNatale Reesman, we have a few photos and graphics of a very well-known personality from the Trenton area in the mid to late 40's and early 50's. Thanks also to Photoshop for allowing me to "tweak" these graphics and remove scotch tape residue, and "foxing" (tanning) of the 60 year old images.

1935: NAZI PERSECUTION; WAR CLOUDS GATHER

It is difficult to imagine a society in which power is given to those whose hatred of non "Aryan" races are victims of extermination. These pre-WWII articles on Antisemitism in Germany prior to "Krystalnacht" and the Holocaust, gives a good idea of the sentiments of those whose mission is was to exterminate a race.

1947 Rocky DiNatale's Auto Garage

Wow, what memories! If you could magically sneak around to the right in this photo, you would be entering the bays at Rocky DiNatale's garage. Chances are there would be two '38 Ford business coupes being converted to racing stock cars. Chances are also good that you might see teenagers Tommy Glover, Ernie Plaag, and Don Slabicki admiring the wizards of automobile modification at work. You definitely would see one or more of Rocky's "Motorettes," which was a great little vehicle that held its own on the road. I will be posting a photo of the little gem which Jan Reesman was kind enough to share with us. Rocky DiNatale was a local legend on the local racing scene back in the mid to late 40's and into the early 50's. This photo was sent to me by Rocky's daughter, Janice, who is an accomplished motion picture writer-director. In fact, there are more graphics from Jan, and I am in the process of removing the remnants of scotch tape and other ravages of age.

1935: HAMILTON'S SUMMER SCHOOL PLAYGROUNDS

In checking the Kuser School participants in the playground program, I see my late sister in law, Kathleen Britton, and my cousin, the late June Williamson. Save those Neighborhood schools!

Thursday, April 16, 2009

1935: TRENTON COUNTRY CLUB NEW SWIMMING POOL


Most of Trenton's high society members were at the beautiful Trenton Country Club when the club's new $15,000 swimming pool was opened for club members. There are few more beautiful venues in the Mercer County area that that found at the Trenton Country Club.

1935: NAZI PERSECUTION; WAR CLOUDS GATHER

Jews, Catholics, and dissident Protestants are warned by the Fascist Nazi party to face dire consequences if Hitler's National Socialist programs are criticized from the pulpit. Already, the Jews were facing degradation at the hands of Nazi rownshirts and other assorted thugs. The worse was yet to come.

2009: SAVE THE DATE. APPRECIATE THE MARSH!!


FRIENDS for the MARSH

Hamilton - Trenton - Bordentown

Preservation * Advocacy * Education * Protection

In Partnership with D & R Greenway Land Trust

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

CONTACT: Daniel Aubrey – aubrey26@rcn.com

609-213-2918

“ONE OF THE NATION’S MOST IMPORTANT ARCHAEOLOGICAL SITES”

NATIONAL HISTORIC LANDMARK

ABBOTT FARM

IN HAMILTON, NEW JERSEY

TOPIC OF ARCHAEOLOGY PRESENTATION

TRENTON (NJ) –Three respected archaeology and anthropology experts will lead a public discussion on one of the most important archaeological sites in the United States, the Abbott Farm Landmark district located in Hamilton Township.

The program takes pace at 2 PM, May 17 at Mercer County Park’s recently designated nature center located at 157 Westcott Avenue at the entrance of Roebling Park, in Hamilton, NJ. .

The subject of over 100 books and publication and the site of ongoing archaeological exploration, Abbott Farm is a focal point of research that traces several thousand years of human occupation from the Paleo-Indian period through the colonial to the present.

The site is named after Charles Conrad Abbott, a nineteenth-century Trenton archaeologist, author of numerous books, medical doctor, and a field assistant with the Peabody Museum. His research at his home along the Crosswicks Creek area marsh near Trenton was the catalyst for early American archaeology explorations and a series of important excavations on the site.

A National Historic Landmark, the highest designation bestowed by the Federal Government, Abbott Farm is recognized by the New Jersey State Museum as “one of the most significant prehistoric sites in the Northeast,” and named “one of the nation’s most important archaeological sites” by the National Park Service.

The May 17 program will be lead by three leaders of state archaeology: Richard Hunter of Hunter Research, Karen Flinn of the New Jersey State Museum, and Michael Stewart of Temple University.

Archaeologist Richard W. Hunter is the president of the Trenton based Hunter Research, Inc., which, in addition to providing a recent study on Abbott Farm, has led important New Jersey research work for the State of New Jersey.

Karen Flynn is an assistant curator of Archaeology and Ethnology at the New Jersey State Museum, which boasts a long connection with research at Abbott Farm through its association with famed archaeologist and Abbott Farm research Dorothy Cross.

Michael Steward, a professor of anthropology at Temple University, the author of studies on the native populations of the Delaware Valley and involved with ongoing research regarding Abbott Farm.

The event, presented by the Friends of the Hamilton Trenton Bordentown Marsh as part of a marsh awareness weekend, is free and open to the public.

The Friends of the Hamilton Trenton Bordentown Marsh is a project of the Delaware and Raritan Greenway. For more visit marsh-friends.org or drgreenway.org or call 609-924-4646.