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Tuesday, March 31, 2009

1897: HAVE I FOUND ASAY SPRINGS?

I have had two or three visitors to my website asking about the location of Asay Springs. I think I may have found the answer. The obit in the shaded area above right reports the passing of Mr. Pearson A. Cubberley, and as you can see, it mentions his farm which is located on the site of Asay Springs. I have super-imposed a black arrow, pointing to the farm of "P. Cubberley, including two buildings, and if you look closeley, you will see that he held 80 acres. That area along Crosswick's Creek, along with Broad Street Park's Spring Lake, was the location of numerous underground springs. The draw bridge shown in the map is long gone, replaced by the bridge that crosses Crosswicks Creek on Route 206 South.
(A note from Tom: There was a Revolutionary War skirmish
at that draw bridge.)

2009: CLARK PERRY-GOODBYE FOR NOW

I really get a morose and melancholy reaction when I read of the passing of still another classmate. Especially those who went through twelve years of school with me, from Miss Mary Kelley's Reception grade at Kuser School, through Hamilton High Class of 1951. Clark was one of the stalwarts as a tenor in our years with Louise Baird's vocal music class. I have been blessed with an incredible ability to remember persons, places, and things from my very earliest years. Countless memories of Clark and his twin brother Art will always be with me. Louise Baird used to mix a bit of philosophical wisdom in with our music repertoire. One of those philosophical gems applies to my old friend, Clark:
"Make the world a bit more beautiful because you have lived in it." Clark did. Rest in Peace my friend, we WILL meet again.

Monday, March 30, 2009

1897 HIREM WELLER'S BOAT WORKS





The MAP, photo, and article above tells the fascinating history and evolution of the old Hirem Weller Boat Works, once located on Brunswick Avenue and adjoining the canal. During its heyday, the company was reknowned for quality and seaworthy vessels. The shaded area of the map shows where the yard was located, a basin along the Delaware and Raritan Canal on Brunswick Avenue between Southard Street and Evans Avenue on today's map.

1897: GRACE BAPTIST CHURCH CADWALADER PLACE

The Grace Baptist Church, in the 700 block of West State Street was a "mission church" of Trenton's venerable First Baptist Church on Centre Street.

1897: CADWALADER PLACE - ELDORADO

The beautiful area we know of as Cadwalader Place was described in the above real estate ad as "Eldorado." It was and is a "gold mine" community which has managed to maintain its ambiance over the years. The above graphic has been cut and pasted into a single graphic. (The "Trenton's Eldorado" was on a different page from the actual ad.) It was cut and pasted next to the real estate ad.

1897: POTTERY INDUSTRY IN TRENTON

My father and his brother and sisters came from the little town of Stoke in Great Britain, to the pottery city of Trenton in 1914 or 1915. Along with Steubenville, Ohio, Trenton was a thriving pottery center, turning out pottery of nearly every type, from the finest porcelain to sanitary ware. The article above gives an idea of the depth of the industry in the Trenton area. Huge kilns lined the canal along today's route one-Trenton Freeway. They're all gone now, victims of social and economics conditions with which we are all familiar. Today, when one looks for the Hallmark on a lovely piece of Lenox, one reads "Made in China" rather than the hallmark that was proudly imprinted in the glory years of the Trenton pottery industry, "Made in U.S.A."

Sunday, March 29, 2009

FYI: THE TRENTON TIMES WEBSITE

They tell me that multitudes are reading newspapers on line. Personally, I don't think anything will ever replace my first-thing-in-the-morning cup of coffee and my favorite morning newspapers. But for the growing internet newspaper readership, the folks at the Times of Trenton have made it easier to surf their website. It will be much easier for out of towners to access my latest
"Sentimental Journey" column. Go to:


http://www.nj.com/times

Arrow down to "COLUMNISTS" and click on my name.
Thanks to all my loyal readers!

FYI: THE TRENTON TIMES WEBSITE

They tell me that multitudes are reading newspapers on line. Personally, I don't think anything will ever replace my first-thing-in-the-morning cup of coffee and my favorite morning newspapers. But for the growing internet newspaper readership, the folks at the Times of Trenton have made it easier to surf their website. It will be much easier for out of towners to access my latest
"Sentimental Journey" column. Go to:


http://www.nj.com/times

Arrow down to "COLUMNISTS" and click on my name.
Thanks to all my loyal readers!

FYI: THE TRENTON TIMES WEBSITE

They tell me that multitudes are reading newspapers on line. Personally, I don't think anything will ever replace my first-thing-in-the-morning cup of coffee and my favorite morning newspapers. But for the growing internet newspaper readership, the folks at the Times of Trenton have made it easier to surf their website. It will be much easier for out of towners to access my latest
"Sentimental Journey" column. Go to:


http://www.nj.com/times

Arrow down to "COLUMNISTS" and click on my name.
Thanks to all my loyal readers!

FYI: THE TRENTON TIMES WEBSITE

They tell me that multitudes are reading newspapers on line. Personally, I don't think anything will ever replace my first-thing-in-the-morning cup of coffee and my favorite morning newspapers. But for the growing internet newspaper readership, the folks at the Times of Trenton have made it easier to surf their website. It will be much easier for out of towners to access my latest
"Sentimental Journey" column. Go to:


http://www.nj.com/times

Arrow down to "COLUMNISTS" and click on my name.
Thanks to all my loyal readers!

FYI: THE TRENTON TIMES WEBSITE

They tell me that multitudes are reading newspapers on line. Personally, I don't think anything will ever replace my first-thing-in-the-morning cup of coffee and my favorite morning newspapers. But for the growing internet newspaper readership, the folks at the Times of Trenton have made it easier to surf their website. It will be much easier for out of towners to access my latest
"Sentimental Journey" column. Go to:


http://www.nj.com/times

Arrow down to "COLUMNISTS" and click on my name.
Thanks to all my loyal readers!

FYI: THE TRENTON TIMES WEBSITE

They tell me that multitudes are reading newspapers on line. Personally, I don't think anything will ever replace my first-thing-in-the-morning cup of coffee and my favorite morning newspapers. But for the growing internet newspaper readership, the folks at the Times of Trenton have made it easier to surf their website. It will be much easier for out of towners to access my latest
"Sentimental Journey" column. Go to:


http://www.nj.com/times

Arrow down to "COLUMNISTS" and click on my name.
Thanks to all my loyal readers!

FYI: THE TRENTON TIMES WEBSITE

They tell me that multitudes are reading newspapers on line. Personally, I don't think anything will ever replace my first-thing-in-the-morning cup of coffee and my favorite morning newspapers. But for the growing internet newspaper readership, the folks at the Times of Trenton have made it easier to surf their website. It will be much easier for out of towners to access my latest
"Sentimental Journey" column. Go to:


http://www.nj.com/times

Arrow down to "COLUMNISTS" and click on my name.
Thanks to all my loyal readers!

FYI: THE TRENTON TIMES WEBSITE

They tell me that multitudes are reading newspapers on line. Personally, I don't think anything will ever replace my first-thing-in-the-morning cup of coffee and my favorite morning newspapers. But for the growing internet newspaper readership, the folks at the Times of Trenton have made it easier to surf their website. It will be much easier for out of towners to access my latest
"Sentimental Journey" column. Go to:


http://www.nj.com/times

Arrow down to "COLUMNISTS" and click on my name.
Thanks to all my loyal readers!

1885: A LOOK AT OLD TRENTON INNS AND TAVERNS

Trenton was short changed when it comes to the early town fathers' efforts to preserve the treasures that once graced the town. The article above lists a few of the historic inns and taverns which once dotted the landscape. My old newspapers tell of the wanton destruction of many historic buildings that were every bit as historic as the "old town" section of Philadelphia.

Saturday, March 28, 2009

1897: TRENTON NEARLY BECAME FEDERAL CITY

Anyone who follows local history knows that Trenton was once considered as the site of the nation's capital. Indeed, Federal City Road in Ewing seems to be the only historic reminder of the plan to make Trenton the center of the young nation's government. The above story tells how a few southerners stood in the way of the honor.

1897: TRENTON'S PROGRESS

From the "TRENTON, DEVELOPMENT OF" folder, this interesting look back at the city of Trenton as it was 112 years ago. I find these articles to be completely fascinating. Comparing the vital and growing city as it moved into the 20th century.

1944: Captain Ralph Able and Ginny

Ginny Abel was a classmate in Hamilton's class of '51 (the class with class). Her winning smile and pleasant personality endeared her to her classmates. Ralph Abel was in the "Phys Ed" department with Joe Bartlett, Kip Breece, and Don Devine, Carl Abbott, Herb Griffith, Lea Terry, and Bernie Hughes.

s.

1944: Captain Ralph Able and Ginny

Ginny Abel was a classmate in Hamilton's class of '51 (the class with class). Her winning smile and pleasant personality endeared her to her classmates. Ralph Abel was in the "Phys Ed" department with Joe Bartlett, Kip Breece, and Don Devine, Carl Abbott, Herb Griffith, Lea Terry, and Bernie Hughes.

s.

1944: Captain Ralph Able and Ginny

Ginny Abel was a classmate in Hamilton's class of '51 (the class with class). Her winning smile and pleasant personality endeared her to her classmates. Ralph Abel was in the "Phys Ed" department with Joe Bartlett, Kip Breece, and Don Devine, Carl Abbott, Herb Griffith, Lea Terry, and Bernie Hughes.

s.

1944: Captain Ralph Able and Ginny

Ginny Abel was a classmate in Hamilton's class of '51 (the class with class). Her winning smile and pleasant personality endeared her to her classmates. Ralph Abel was in the "Phys Ed" department with Joe Bartlett, Kip Breece, and Don Devine, Carl Abbott, Herb Griffith, Lea Terry, and Bernie Hughes.

s.

1944: Captain Ralph Able and Ginny

Ginny Abel was a classmate in Hamilton's class of '51 (the class with class). Her winning smile and pleasant personality endeared her to her classmates. Ralph Abel was in the "Phys Ed" department with Joe Bartlett, Kip Breece, and Don Devine, Carl Abbott, Herb Griffith, Lea Terry, and Bernie Hughes.

s.

1944: Captain Ralph Able and Ginny

Ginny Abel was a classmate in Hamilton's class of '51 (the class with class). Her winning smile and pleasant personality endeared her to her classmates. Ralph Abel was in the "Phys Ed" department with Joe Bartlett, Kip Breece, and Don Devine, Carl Abbott, Herb Griffith, Lea Terry, and Bernie Hughes.

s.

1944: Captain Ralph Able and Ginny

Ginny Abel was a classmate in Hamilton's class of '51 (the class with class). Her winning smile and pleasant personality endeared her to her classmates. Ralph Abel was in the "Phys Ed" department with Joe Bartlett, Kip Breece, and Don Devine, Carl Abbott, Herb Griffith, Lea Terry, and Bernie Hughes.

s.

1953: AMERICAN STANDARD EMPLOYEES

Coinciding with Alan Wildblood's recent request to identify American Standard employees, I found this photo in my "BUSINESSES-FACTORIES, HAMILTON." None of the men in the photo are identified. The only entry on the other side of the photo is "1953."

1944: EWING POLICE CHIEF FORST

There is another similar post on this website, detailing Ewing police activity from the year 1944. (This one is for 1943, the preceding year.)

1944: P59 JET FLIES OVER TRENTON

During the WWII era, the letter "P" prefixing an aircraft was the designation they gave to a pursuit aircraft. As time passed and aircraft technology witnessed the advent of jet propulsion, the letter "P" was replaced with "F" as in fighter. I can't say that I remember this local history making flight, but it obviously thrilled those who saw one of those newfangled jet aircraft streaking across Trenton skies.

Friday, March 27, 2009

1940'S: CAN YOU HELP IDENTIFY THESE FOLKS?

With the many visitors to my website, I thought that perhaps someone might recognize some of these American Radiator and Standard & Sanitary Company employees from the 1940's. Alan Wildblood's Dad is the only one we can identify (lower left). If you can identify any of them, please use the numbers which are with each photo.

Alan wrote:

Dear Tom,

Could you please help me identify some people by posting several uncaptioned photos from an album of my father, Harold Wildblood. Your readership is vastly superior to any circle of Trentonians I could reach through any other channel available to me. These pictures were taken at American-Standard in Hamilton, formerly Maddock Pottery, which was under construction in 1924, prior to his departure from the firm on October 31, 1947. Harold worked in the shipping department so most of the people depicted will have been from that department. They are posing with crates, probably containing toilets, labeled “Standard Fixtures, Trenton Works."

Two of the pictures are marked “Lou 1”, possibly meaning Lou was to get a print of himself and his girl or a girl he admired.

Harold’s 1947 farewell card was signed by the following people, some of whom may be the unknown Tillie and Timmy the Toilers:

ASSOCIATED NAMES:

Ruth Capewell, Helen M. Orban née Roche, Angie Persiani neé Cerino, Charles O'Brien, Burton J. Evans (shipping), Robert Burns, Joseph Cleary, Harvey Trimmer, Harold E. Sexton, Irvin Frisbie, Miss Mona J. Kritser, Edward J. Goldenbaum, Vincent Gavigan, Florence M. Hendrickson, Mrs. Helen M. Furman, Miss Helen Citkowski, Miss June De Valle, Karl A. Mundt, Al Steinmetz, Mrs. Ethel Steber, Jane Wolverton (telephone operator), Miss Mary Samsal, Miss Marjorie McCoy, Stan Puhalski, Miss Dot Eib, Mary Priest, Frank Yopp, Lee Mathews Jr., Harry J. Case, Carroll Mayers, William E. Hannisch (shipping orders), Berrell Bowne, Richard Jamilewicz, Al M. White (accountant), Rudy C. Metzler, Bob M. Everett, Jack Bayer, Miss Doris (Dickie) MacBean, Miss Audrey Howarth, Miss Vivian Eagle.

Thursday, March 26, 2009

1944: BINDER'S DOWNTOWN TRENTON

This building would have been the building that was destroyed by a devastating fire in the late 1940's; I seem to recall it as being in 1947. Along with the Binder's fire, there was also a huge fire during the same time period at New Jersey Floor Covering (??) on South Broad Street in downtown Trenton.

1944: TRENTON CATHOLIC FRESHMEN PRODUCTION

"Life Begins at 16;" indeed it does! At 16, I had 3...count 'em, 3 (or was it 4?) female classmates with whom I was carrying a romantic torch. As one who received my complete education in a co-ed environment, it is difficult to imagine what it would have been like in grammar and high school without all those lovely female crushes I embraced during my 12 years of schooling. Apparently you guys from Trenton Catholic did all right, but it must have been a challenge to have your best girl friend across town at Cathedral and only see her on weekends.

1944: 95TH ANNIVERSARY OF THE TRINITY LUTHERAN CHURCH

>

Yesterday I published duplicate posts on the above graphic. In the post. Naturally, I nuked the one that had descriptive text requesting any visitors to enlighten me on whether the "Trenton Evangelical Lutheran church was the same entity as the German Lutheran Church. Thanks to fellow genealogist/historian Alan Wildblood, I have received the following note:


Alan wrote 2 REPLIES TO THIS REQUEST FOR FURTHER INFO:


REPLY 1:

I am not an expert but have an opinion. Here in Germany the Protestant state church goes by Evangelisch. At first I wanted to translate that as Lutheran. The German Protestants, or at least some of them, nowadays like to translate that simply as "Protestant." One reason is that "Evangelical" sounds like a bunch of right-wing, redneck Bible Belt fanatics. This religious and political wing of Christianity has a bad press, certainly here in Germany. Lately I have been tending toward "Evangelical Lutheran." I think it is like the Protestant Episcopals dropping the Protestant and the Methodist Episcopals dropping the Episcopal. In old newspapers you also see "German Lutheran" and "English Lutheran." I am sure that just means the language used in the services. In other words, I would be willing to bet you a brew that Trinity Evangelical Lutheran at some point dropped the "Evangelical." If nobody gives you a more authoritative view, it wouldn't be that hard to figure it out by comparing addresses in old articles.


REPLY 2:

Here is a little more on Trinity Lutheran. An 1964 article says it was founded in 1849. The 1964 address was 189 South Broad Street.

In 1863 Trinity Evangelical Lutheran was on Broad Street with a service in German at 10:30 a.m. and in English at 3:30 p.m.

…1885 we again find Trinity Evangelical Lutheran.

…1897 through 1912 Trinity German Lutheran on South Broad near Livingston, and that included a 1906 sauerkraut supper enjoyed by 100 people.

…1922 Trinity Lutheran was cited at Broad near Livingston.

... 1924 pulpit notices only have St. Paul’s Lutheran using “Evangelical,” with Church of the Saviour at Front and Montgomery no longer using “Evangelical” as it had in 1908.

... 1963 Trinity Evangelical Lutheran Church sold lots at 30 Livingston Street to J. B. Van Sciver.

From the 1929 History of Trenton published under the auspices of the Trenton Historical Association, I quote:

The first Lutheran congregation to come into existence in Trenton was that of 1849, which is to be identified with the present German Evangelical Lutheran Trinity Church on South Broad Street. … In 1849 the Rev. Charles Augustus Brandt came to Trenton and organized a German-speaking congregation, to which was given the title "St. John's Congregation of the Augsburg Confession of Trenton and South Trenton." The first services, 1849, were held in a room of the City Hall and afterwards in Scott's Hall opposite.

Polish Lutherans still cite the Augsburg Confession in official references to their denomination.


1944: HADASSAH HELPS THE HELPLESS

From the growing "JEWISH" folder, this sad story of displaced Jewish children, victims of Nazi atrocities during WWII. It is speculation on my part, but at this time in the war, Nazi holocaust atrocities were being rumored and reported. It would be a few short months before the allied forces witnessed the results of the beastly Nazi prison camp atrocities.

1940: JUNIOR FOUR ORCHESTRA

NOTE: MY OLD FRIEND GUS PERILLI HAS INFORMED ME THAT THE JUNIOR 4-GRACE DUNN SCHOOL ALUMNI SOCIETY WILL BE MEETING AT THE HAMILTON LIBRARY. I HAVE ASSURED GUS THAT HE HAS UNLIMITED ACCESS TO ANY AND ALL NEWS ITEMS I FOUND AND WILL FIND IN THE FUTURE.

Some very familiar names are in the above photo. There's my old friend from St. Anthony Parish, Nick Tomasulo, (Spelled "la femina as Tomasula) Harry Dilts, and Wes Hopkins, who went on to a WTTM radio career. I note other names familiar to Trenton area residents of the day, but whom I never had the pleasure to meet.

1944: Fascinating Township Budget Meeting

Can you imagine local municipalities sending cigarettes to our men and women fighting over in the middle east?
How very politically incorrect; and you think combat is hazardous to your health!
Back in the late 40's I passed by Bartolini's used car lot on the northwest corner of Cedar Lane and Chambers Street. Additionally, one of my buddies back then was young Joe Ranier, who along with Ernie Plaag, and Don Slabicki found Rocky DiNatale's stock car racing enterprise completely fascinating.

1944: WINNER ENGINEERING CO.

This was probably the "Help Wanted" ad my father answered when he took a night job at the Winner Engineering Corp. in 1944. The company made life rafts for the U.S. Navy.

Wednesday, March 25, 2009

2009: "A PAUSE IN THE DAY'S OCCUPATION.."

NO, THAT "PAUSE IN THE DAY'S OCCUPATION" ABOVE ISN'T AN INTRO TO HENRY WADSWORTH LONGFELLOW'S "CHILDRENS' HOUR."
YOU WILL NOTE THE LACK OF NEW POSTS OVER THE PAST 24 HOURS. THE REASON:
I HAVE BEEN WORKING DILIGENTLY ON A MULTI-MEDIA PRESENTATION ENTITLED,
"KUSER SCHOOL: A LOCAL LEGEND."
THIS NON-POWERPOINT ENDEAVOR IS A VERY COMPLICATED AND TIME CONSUMING PROJECT. TOMORROW'S ANOTHER DAY, THINGS WILL BE BACK TO NORMAL TOMORROW.
THANKS FOR YOUR INDULGENCE.

1897: TRENTON NEWSPAPERS OF YESTERYEAR

The above article is an interesting listing of local newspapers which served the area through the years.

One of the joys of life is that first cup of coffee in the morning, and leisurely paging through the morning newspapers. I can't even begin to imagine the computer taking the place of "hard copy" as found on our tables each morning. Recent rumblings from various sources predict that the internet will eventually supplant newspapers. I can't conceive of that happening, though I must admit the industry has been on a decline in recent years.

Tuesday, March 24, 2009

1979: Al DeMartin, Superintendent

Al was a high profile Hamiltonian who was accessible; a very rare trait in today's society. Were it not for him, many of the historical entries you are finding on Hamilton High, Kuser, and other Hamilton Township schools would never have seen the light of day. How refreshing it was to pick up the phone, dial it, and have a real live secretary answer, and more refreshing, to ask for Mr. DeMartin and have a real live conversation with the real live Superintendent of Hamilton's schools. None of the "If you know your party's extension, enter it now...." "....I'm sorry, I can't come to the phone right now. If you leave your message, someone will get back to you..." "..he (or she) is in a meeting; I'll have him return your call..." You know the drill; you're still waiting for the return call. Voice mail is the worse thing that ever happened to mankind's efforts to correspond with fellow citizens who are insulated in their respective offices.

1890: SANDTOWN AND SAND HILLS

Read the above article and learn why Mercerville was once known as "Sandtown," and Yardville "Sand Hills." Indeed, a very large part of southern Mercer County was the recipient of sandy sediment which I assume went back to the age of gaciers.

1890: TRENTON'S SUMPTUOUS MANSIONS

Don't you wish we could go back and start all over again? Greenwood Avenue area near the rail station, Monmouth Street, West State Street, and the immediate environs had some of the most incredibly beautiful homes with the accompanying gardens and verandas back in the Victorian era. As you pass down Greenwood Avenue today, you will still see some of these beautiful mansions, once owned by some of Trenton's most affluent and influential people, falling into ruin. Some are even boarded up.

1890:TRENTON IS A BASEBALL TOWN

Play Ball! With the start of the 2009 baseball season getting underway with another week or so, it's appropriate that I start to enter a few interesting items regarding America's favorite pastime from my "BASEBALL" folder. I really look forward to another season of Yankee baseball. (Yup, a Yankee fan since 1948 from radio 1010 WINS in New York with Mel Allen, Red Barber, Mickey Mantle, White Ford, Yogi Berra and countless other baseball heroes I have heard and watched over the years.) I find the above article to be of great interest. There are many articles relating to the Cuban baseball players. Apparently they were much like the Negro league which had many stars that I am sure were superior to a number of major league players.

Monday, March 23, 2009

THANKS, TOM REED



Tom Reed has been a glover320.blogspot.com visitor since the very beginning. Tom is also the nephew of legendary fire fighter "Cap" Dempster. Thanks for this interesting photo, Tom. Thanks also for your support. If there are any former Trenton "Goose Town" residents who visit this site, Tom would like to hear from you.
TOM: ABOVE IS A PHOTO OF A GENTLEMAN STANDING ON A BRIDGE AT REED'S MILL ON QUAKER BRIDGE ROAD. MAYBE THIS IS PHOTO IS NAMED FOR YOUR FAMILY. I AM ALSO INCLUDING A PHOTO OF THE DAM BREAK AT REED'S MILL. I THOUGHT THAT THESE REEDS MAY BE RELATIVES.

Tom writes:


Tom,

I'm sending a picture of a family reunion at Grand pop James Reed's farm in Hamilton, taken in the early 1930's. That's me on Mom's lap in the left front. The tall man in the white shirt in the back row is Uncle "Cap" Dempster whom the Mercer County Fire School/Museum is named for. Beyond the fence is a cemetery. In my trips to Trenton, I've stopped many times at the Hamilton Tax office to try to look up the location of the property, but everyone was always very busy. G'pop sold it in the later 1930's and it may be part of one of the cemeteries now.